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Grass-fed overrated? Grass-fed vs grain-fed

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  • #31
    1



    Good points, maba and Tara tootie!

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    • #32
      1



      http://www.simplytrinicooking.com/2008/07/homemade-coconut-oil-trini-style.html


      It looks like coconut oil can be home rendered in a very similar way as lard.

      It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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      • #33
        1



        Huh! That's cool, Grandma! I didn't know that! Unfortunately coconut products don't play nice with my digestion. :-(

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        • #34
          1



          What an difficult way to get a cup of oil!


          Like olive oil, coconut oil is made commercially with expeller pressing. It's just like one of those sausage grinders grandma's used to have. A tightening screw increases pressure and the oil is squeezed out. No heat.

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          • #35
            1



            life is hard dude. There is no magic way to separate the water and oil. You have two choices: dry the coconut before you press it or separate the water and oil after.


            There are 2 heat free ways. wet mill and centrifuge or wet mill and fermentation to let the oil separate on it's own. Dry milling requires heat to dry the coconut and produces heat in the pressing.


            All trivial arguments -- the point is that virgin coconut oil can be produced by primitive means. Unlike corn oil or even refined coconut oil (the flavorless hydrogenated stuff). Therefore enjoy at will.

            It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

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            • #36
              1



              Phosphates in super-market meats:


              http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/2...permarket.html

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              • #37
                There are also small local ranchers who are feeding their beef on grass AND corn. Not all grain-fed meat is factory farmed. I do know that beef from cattle that are fed grass has a much better taste, it gives the beef a much more savory beefy flavor. But feeding cattle on low quality pasture grasses, grass that does not have enough sugar and calories to meet their nutritional needs, can give the beef an off flavor. So feeding beef cattle on pasture grass along with corn results in really good tasting beef that never has an off flavor. Plus adding corn to a grassfed diet means that you can harvest the beef at a younger age, tenderer beef.

                The marketing of grassfed beef has been at a very high level. Advocates of grassfed beef have used everything they can think of to try to turn people away from Big Beef, which I don't mind. But in doing so, they have vilified corn, which I don't like so much. Corn is an inexpensive source of nutrition and energy. Adding corn to a grass diet is the only way that I can produce superior tasting beef at a reasonable price.

                So overhyped? Maybe. But if you want the best tasting beef that you can get, buy your beef from a small local guy who is breeding cattle for superior carcass traits and feeding their beef in a grass pasture. And don't be worried if they are feeding corn to their beef cattle.

                Omega 6 Low Carb Age

                Myth: Feeding Cattle Corn Is Unnatural | Meat MythCrushers

                Myth: Grass-Fed Beef Is Safer Than Beef From Cattle Finished On Corn And Grains | Meat MythCrushers

                Myth: Grass-Fed Beef Is More Nutritious Than Beef From Cattle Finished On Corn And Grains | Meat MythCrushers

                AgriLife News

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by AngusCattleman View Post
                  There are also small local ranchers who are feeding their beef on grass AND corn. Not all grain-fed meat is factory farmed. I do know that beef from cattle that are fed grass has a much better taste, it gives the beef a much more savory beefy flavor. But feeding cattle on low quality pasture grasses, grass that does not have enough sugar and calories to meet their nutritional needs, can give the beef an off flavor. So feeding beef cattle on pasture grass along with corn results in really good tasting beef that never has an off flavor. Plus adding corn to a grassfed diet means that you can harvest the beef at a younger age, tenderer beef.

                  The marketing of grassfed beef has been at a very high level. Advocates of grassfed beef have used everything they can think of to try to turn people away from Big Beef, which I don't mind. But in doing so, they have vilified corn, which I don't like so much. Corn is an inexpensive source of nutrition and energy. Adding corn to a grass diet is the only way that I can produce superior tasting beef at a reasonable price.

                  So overhyped? Maybe. But if you want the best tasting beef that you can get, buy your beef from a small local guy who is breeding cattle for superior carcass traits and feeding their beef in a grass pasture. And don't be worried if they are feeding corn to their beef cattle.

                  Omega 6 Low Carb Age

                  Myth: Feeding Cattle Corn Is Unnatural | Meat MythCrushers

                  Myth: Grass-Fed Beef Is Safer Than Beef From Cattle Finished On Corn And Grains | Meat MythCrushers

                  Myth: Grass-Fed Beef Is More Nutritious Than Beef From Cattle Finished On Corn And Grains | Meat MythCrushers

                  AgriLife News
                  Apparently you dont know much about this way of eating if you support corn

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                  • #39
                    It's not just about the fat content.

                    Cows do not digest corn well. It causes inflammation of their gut and increases risk of infection. That's one of the big reasons factory farm cattle are pumped full of antibiotics and growth hormones. Cattle suffer the pro-inflammatory effects of a grain diet as much, possibly even more, than humans do. Plus, grain-fed cattle are more likely to spend their lives confined to a feedlot in overcrowded conditions, which also increases their risk of illness.

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                    • #40
                      I think the other thing to remember is if we are not intaking grains, why should we eat animals that do? As s-piper mentioned, since cows do not digest corn well and causes inflammation, you can probably assume the same would happen with our bodies.

                      I've also noticed a different in taste and in the way my body digests the meat that's grass-fed compared to grain-fed and hormone injected.

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                      • #41
                        This issue is really not so complicated as many are making it out to be.

                        If you had a choice to eat a healthy animal or a sick one, which would you choose?
                        The Champagne of Beards

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ashamahleyyy View Post
                          I think the other thing to remember is if we are not intaking grains, why should we eat animals that do? As s-piper mentioned, since cows do not digest corn well and causes inflammation, you can probably assume the same would happen with our bodies.

                          I've also noticed a different in taste and in the way my body digests the meat that's grass-fed compared to grain-fed and hormone injected.
                          This, although we should qualify this and say why should we eat mammals that do because some birds are adapted to eat grains. I can't really think of any mammals that are...maybe mice, but that's a big maybe and even then their diet would not be exclusively grain.

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                          • #43
                            Have any of you raised a cow? No, seriously.

                            It is quite possible to feed a cow *some* grain---corn or sweet feed---without plonking it in a feedlot and making it sick. You put the cows out to grass and call them in in the evening for a couple scoops of grain. It teaches them to come when you call 'em. That way you get a look at them nightly and know what is going on. It isn't like feeding them white bread---which I know some people do. The cows digest the grain just fine.

                            Dairy cattle---my Jerseys would go down with milk fever or quit producing outright if I didn't support their production with the extra calories found in grains. Why do you think lactating women eat oatmeal cookies?


                            Legally, animals aren't allowed to be fed antibiotics close to slaughter. They test the meat for residue.

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                            • #44
                              You're applying a few random things about cows to pigs, which is just not that applicable. One is a ruminant and the other isn't. What they can handle is quite different. Pasture raised pigs, which have access to rooting and sunshine, have higher levels of K2 and the Omega-6 levels are substantially lower.

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                              • #45
                                4 year old thread dug up by a guy names Anguscattleman from Texas...I sense ulterior motive. Just a little.
                                F 28/5'4/100 lbs

                                "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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