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Grass-fed overrated? Grass-fed vs grain-fed

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  • #16
    1



    Yes, that's what I thought, Grandma. Makes sense. After all, they've got that ruminant stomach precisely so they can eat grass!

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    • #17
      1



      So to sum up the thread, we've established so far that:
      1. the omega benefits of grass-fed beef are insignificant, because there are hardly any omegas in them to begin with.
      2. CLA is good and the best source is grass-fed meat (and eggs/dairy).
      3. Vitamin K2 is good and is abundant in grass-fed ruminants
      4. Grass-fed is more primal (grains are unnatural, even for cows)



      So, the key question: how much are these benefits worth? Do you buy the cheaper organic grain-fed, or the pricier organic grass-fed? Or a combination to get some of the nutrients and some of the savings?

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      • #18
        1



        I also try to include the factory farming practices/antibiotics/hormones issues in the equation when making my decisions.


        I remember when I was a kid, one dairy advertised that their product came from "contented cows," and all of the California Cheese commercials imply the same thing--happy cows. I wonder if there is any cow--grass-fed or grain-fed that has a decent life before we get the meat we buy. . .


        And, so many of us really do need to think about where we can save a buck these days. . .who would have thought that buying a pound of ground beef could be such a big decision? One thing you can say about us PBers--we don't eat mindlessly!

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        • #19
          1



          More detailed info here:

          http://extension.usu.edu/files/publi...ef_2006-03.pdf

          “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
          "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
          "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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          • #20
            1



            Is it me or are both of toban's links the same?


            Nothing of interest to contribute.

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            • #21
              1



              I also take the environmental impact of my food into my decisions, which is why I strive to buy grass-fed meat and pastured eggs whenever possible. I do it for the health benefits of eating animals that live their lives on their own correct diets, and because I know the farmers that are selling it to me. Although I do feel fairly lucky that the majority of the grass fed meat and eggs that I buy are only $2-3 more per pound than the conventional meat. I do feel that buying as local as possible is nearly as important as buying organic and grass-fed.

              You are what you eat,
              and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

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              • #22
                1



                Oops, my links are the same... here's the correct link for grain-fed ground beef: http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/beef-products/6198/2

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                • #23
                  1



                  SerialSinner, that was an excellent article! It was amazing the difference in vitamin E!


                  I've been wondering how to get vitamin E without nuts (I have problems with nuts) and sure enough, pastured meat and eggs have great amounts of E!

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                  • #24
                    1



                    I just got this link from another forum. Looks like it has some good info about grass-fed and how/where to get it.


                    http://www.eatwild.com/products/index.html

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                    • #25
                      1



                      @marika: meat doesn't look like a very good source of vitamin E. SerialSinner's link shows that grass-fed has 5 mg per kg, which means 0.5 mg per 100g serving of meat. That's puny compared to the 15 mg RDA. My vitamin E supplement is 400IU or 268 mg!


                      One tbsp of olive oil has 1.94 mg. Do like Mark and chug the stuff!

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                      • #26
                        1



                        Well there's definitely a huge difference for pastured eggs:


                        http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2009/05/pastured-eggs.html


                        So I've just eaten a few more pastured eggs every day and have had no problem reaching my vitamin E for the day (along with vegetables). Glorious!


                        FYI, I've been avoiding olive oil and other oils as they are so processed, and have been using pure pastured pork lard instead.

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                        • #27
                          1



                          Marika, how do you come to the conclusion that olive and other oils are "so processed?" Most traditional plant based oils are based on crushing and pressing the oils out. This is true for sesame, olive, and coconut and probably others.


                          Not very processed.


                          Now, after the olive pulp is pressed yet again, modern processing DOES use solvents to get the last little bit. That's why you should always buy Virgin and Extra Virgin (first pressing.)


                          I imagine that that lard doesn't make the best salad dressings, superior as it may be for other uses.


                          Now, those nasty grain based oils are whole different stories. No traditional societies made them.

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                          • #28
                            1



                            Oils are processed much more so than lard. I can make lard myself, it's a simple process to render animal fats. But I couldn't make sesame oil or coconut oil myself.


                            Lard makes an excellent salad dressing, just melt it in a pan then pour it over. It's delicious with a squeeze of lime juice!

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                            • #29
                              1



                              Marika and OTB, there has been some doubt whether EVOO REALLY is EVOO. I think that is been found that a lot of the olive oils are adulterated and impure. There was a thread on it a couple months ago.

                              Life on Earth may be punishing, but it includes an annual free trip around the sun!

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                              • #30
                                1



                                TT, I've heard that EVOO available in the US is of really low quality. I was in Cyprus recently where olive trees grow abundantly, the oil was supremely flavorful (I don't condsider myself a gourmet to notice such nuances but the oil was just yummy). Apparently, the antioxidants in EVOO reduce after 6 months of storage. God knows how long these bottles have been sitting on the shelves.

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