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Question about how to eat sauerkraut....bit confused

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  • Question about how to eat sauerkraut....bit confused

    This question sounds ridiculous, but when the kraut is fully ready and I'm removing the kraut from the jar some of the juices will come out too-- so do I have to keep topping the jar off with water (and weighing it down) to keep the rest of the kraut submerged? How do I store it, since there's a lot of it?

    Seems kind of awkward to get the bloody stuff out!

    edit: talking about home-made kraut
    Last edited by Sabre; 10-12-2013, 02:29 PM.

  • #2
    A little confused by your question. Are you talking about home made sauerkraut? If you are fermenting in a mason jar, wait till the ferment is finished and then keep it in the fridge and at that point you don't have to worry about keeping it submerged. If you are still in the process of fermenting, yes, it always has to be submerged and you really shouldn't be fussing with it till it is done. And if you ever have to add more liquid to your sauerkraut for any reason, you would add brine- not pure water.
    My Recipes are at: www.southbeachprimal.com

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    • #3
      Hi, yeah I'm talking about home made kraut.

      I didn't realise you could keep it in the fridge without it being submerged-- won't it go off? It won't get mouldy?

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      • #4
        Keeps in fridge no problem. Never had mould problems one refrigerated
        Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

        Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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        • #5
          Sabre, I am making my first batch today so I've been reading like a fiend. Sandor Katz said if you want it to keep fermenting after you've taken some out of the jar, you can add a cup of water with a tsp of salt dissolved in it. I like the idea of trying it every couple of days until I figure out how fermented I like it.

          Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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          • #6
            I'm guessing that, "on a grass fed hot dog with mustard," is not what you were looking for?

            Here's a tip for keeping things submerged. You know those little plastic thingies that hold condiments or sauces when you have a to-go order? If you have a friend who works in hospitality/food ask her/him for a couple of those. Once you have your veggies/brine all set up, sit that on top and screw the top on the jar. It works great at keeping everything submerged.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #7
              Joanie, everything I have read says to ferment with just a cloth lid so oxygen gets to it. Or do you mean after it's fermented and on it's way to the frige?

              Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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              • #8
                Fermentation is an anaerobic process. You definitely do not want oxygen to get to it. The ferment should be started with as little air-food contact as possible, letting the CO2 & gasses that are created out with an airlock or something. submerging is great because you keep the food away from air, but you still don't want mold on top of the brine so start with the jar as full as possible. When you see green or white mold, that is aerobic and indicative of room air contamination. Since bacteria is cold-blooded (for use of simpler terms) you want to ferment at room temp or a little warmer. Then seal with an air-tight lid once the gasses stop forming. Once you open the container to consume, it should be put into the fridge (Sandor refers to this as the Fermentation-slowing device) .

                Fermentation in open crocks is open to air. You put your cukes or cabbage or whatever into the crock and make sure it is covered in brine, held down with a plate or something. Then cover the crock with cheese cloth to keep flies out. You must expect to skim mold off of the top and you always want to keep the brine topped off with no food exposed. once the ferment is complete, put in fridge. The mold will still grow if it is open, but slowly.

                ~Jimm

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                • #9
                  One other thing, after struggling with mould when I first started fermenting, I rarely see it now. I suspect it has to do with creating the right environment so that the bacteria are favoured over the mould. It sure makes fermenting a lot easier. I tend to rinse my gear between each ferment rather than was with soap
                  Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                  Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                  • #10
                    Well, we'll see how this goes. I am just using what I have. I'm using a 1.5 qt tall jar with a flip top attached lid with a rubber gasket. I removed the lid and have the jar covered with a cloth. It's in the same darkish, not freezing room as my kombucha so the room has good mojo. Everything is covered with liquid by several inches except for floating bits. I'll watch for mold. Hopefully, I won't have to buy a special crock.

                    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
                      Well, we'll see how this goes. I am just using what I have. I'm using a 1.5 qt tall jar with a flip top attached lid with a rubber gasket. I removed the lid and have the jar covered with a cloth. It's in the same darkish, not freezing room as my kombucha so the room has good mojo. Everything is covered with liquid by several inches except for floating bits. I'll watch for mold. Hopefully, I won't have to buy a special crock.

                      Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
                      As Jimm said, you only need to allow for the CO2 to escape. I use a Korean kimchi crock, which just has a lid that sits on top - no seal. Sits on my kitchen bench
                      Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                      Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                      • #12
                        Just took a leaf of cabbage and covered the liquid with it and weighted it down with a weighted glass. No more floating bits exposed. Then I covered the lot with a cloth to keep any fruit flies or dust out. I think this is gonna work. Fingers crossed.

                        Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                        • #13
                          It's counterintuitive to me that I can just store it in the fridge, not submerged.

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                          • #14
                            Saber, you really can. Sealing the jar and putting it in a cold environment stops fermentation and inhibits bacterial growth. Same with Kombucha, cheeses, doughs etc.

                            Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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                            • #15
                              I'm trying to get a fermentation group going but haven't had time to nurture it. There you can see the airlock mason jar lids I made for about $2.50 each (identical ones sell on line for almost $20).

                              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/group173.html

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