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eating bugs?

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  • eating bugs?



    I know pre-agro man ate a lot of bugs. I don't find the idea of bugs gross, and I know I could use another source of protein since we are genuinely allergic to dairy (not primal, anyway) and most tree nuts and seeds, and we are avoiding eggs for the time being since my kids are rather atopic.


    Does anyone here eat bugs semi-regularly? Where do you get them? Any recipes or techniques? I think I would enjoy them roasted... We have a forest for a backyard and have an over abundance of crickets. Could I just go out and catch a bunch? Perhaps I'll try just that and report back.


  • #2
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    I've been meaning to pick up some meal worms at the pet store, but haven't gotten around to it.


    I guess the closest thing I've had is crawfish we caught out of the creek. Some of them were so small it was easier just to eat the whole thing, shell and all.

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    • #3
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      hell no... i'm sure eating beef, pork and chicken covers all the bases


      What nutrition would a spider have that the above wouldn't?

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      • #4
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        I've read fried grasshopper is a delicacy in Mexico. If you have Mexican friends, they might be able to give you some tips.

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        • #5
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          well, like i said in my original post, i'd like to have other sources of protein besides animal meat. free-range, organic meat ain't cheap and i've got two bottomless pits, er, small children, to feed. we can't do seeds, nuts or eggs, so... also, roasted crickets would be a very portable snack. coat 'em in oil and dust 'em with spices. yum! i'm seriously going to do this after i clean up the lunch mess.


          also, there are nutrients in the exoskeletons of the insects that are absent in just muscle and organ meats.


          In fact, the team found that crickets contained more than 1,550 milligrams of iron, 25 milligrams of zinc and 340 milligrams of calcium per 100 grams of dry tissue. <...> Many insects had a fairly high concentration of essential amino acids—types that humans need but can’t make. These include lysine and tryptophan...
          (per this article.

          a quick google search yielded these recipes, for the interested.

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          • #6
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            There&#39;s a book one of my mates has mentioned before called "Why Not Eat Insects?" He doesn&#39;t eat them himself, but he&#39;s an entomologist, so he&#39;s interested in everything to do with insects.


            I haven&#39;t got the book, and I&#39;ve never tried insects. Not so long ago, the idea would have been a bit repellent to me: now, I see where you&#39;re coming from. I guess vegetarians find meat repellent, and I&#39;d think they should not try to stay aloof from nature, so why am I? I definitely would if I were with people who ate them and knew where to look and what to eat when. If I were in North Africa with tribal people I&#39;d eat locusts with my wild honey (like John the Baptist); if I were in Australia with Aborigines I&#39;d eat wichitty grubs.


            I don&#39;t know how you&#39;d know they hadn&#39;t eaten anything toxic themselves - unless perhaps you harvested them in the wilds where you knew farmers hadn&#39;t been spraying, etc.


            I guess there&#39;s snails, too. They were in a 1960s English cookbook I had. It just goes to show how recently some people were carrying on traditional practices. The cookbook said the glassblowers in Newcastle-upon-Tyne used to eat them, believing they were good for their rather heated lungs. You gather them from the garden - helps if you know the best edible kinds, I guess - and keep them in an aquarium for a few days, feeding them controlled food, just to make sure any plants they&#39;ve eaten that might not agree with you are out their system.


            I tried a search at Amazon for that book. Looks to be out of print, but you might get it secondhand. When I did the search a book called "Eat-a-bug Cookbook: 33 ways to cook grasshoppers, ants, water bugs, spiders, centipedes, and their kin" popped up, too.


            http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw...x=why+not+eat+

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            • #7
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              Ohh... I have had snails. I forgot about that. So yes, I&#39;ve eaten bugs. LOL

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              • #8
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                I don&#39;t know how you&#39;d know they hadn&#39;t eaten anything toxic themselves - unless perhaps you harvested them in the wilds where you knew farmers hadn&#39;t been spraying, etc

                well, i was considering harvesting from my yard, forest and fields. no one sprays back there unless they are trespassing to do so. lol

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                • #9
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                  That&#39;s interesting! I never knew crickets were so nutritious! They keep coming into our bathroom...guess eating them is one way to get rid of them, LOL!


                  I think DH might think I&#39;d really lost it then though.

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                  • #10
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                    I guess snails aren&#39;t quite the same, since they&#39;re molluscs - not arthropods, like insects:


                    http://tolweb.org/Bilateria/2459


                    But then arthopods include crabs, which most of us have eaten.


                    I&#39;d think snails would be well worth harvesting for anyone that had nice unpolluted land and the right sort of snails. Lovely with some garlic butter.

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