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Primal on a budget - compromises...

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  • #16
    With 2,5 acres you have pace enough to make a lot of things yourself. maybe plant some fruit trees or bushes. carrots, potato, lettuce, green beens en herbs are easy to maintain and don't need a lot of space. chickens are always easy to keep but try to see if you have space for a few goats... goat milk is great and you can use the meat.... or pigs... pigs don't need too much space and are easy to feed. beside grass they eat almost everything...
    My story, My thought....

    It's all about trying to stay healthy!!!!

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    • #17
      Aother vote for soups (no way to make a single chicken stretch further! Can feed 8 people easily!) Also, check out roasts - invest in a slow cooker and go with the cheap cuts because they can become tender and delicious when cooked properly! Bulk ground beef (get lean!) can stretch with rice pasta to make delicious spaghetti, or with properly prepared beans for chili. You can find cheap rice noodles at Asian grocery stores. Ingredients are just white rice and water.

      We are on a budget too, but thankfully it is just the two of us (my hubby and I) but soups, roasts, and potatoes/rice are a life saver.
      5'6" Female, 29 Years Old, 260/195/120

      "Discipline is choosing between what you want NOW, and what you want MOST!"

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      • #18
        Originally posted by cantare View Post
        Lightweight!

        They keep fine in the freezer...I'll take your $17 any time you wanna come over.
        I've bought large quantities in the past and they do freeze well. However Trader Joe's pricing on nuts is comparable and I don't have to lay out the cash for 30lbs.

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        • #19
          I honestly don't trust anything that doesn't come fresh from inside the shell and/or taste completely fresh.

          But yeah, I'll buy $0.40 of pecans off you any day
          My chocolatey Primal journey

          Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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          • #20
            I see all of those as *no problem!*

            You might also consider things like sweet potato, squash, and pumpkins -- all of which are easy to grow, too, if you want to do that.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by pollo_la View Post
              Great idea about trying to get some food from the land we have. We actually have 2.5 acres and plan to start a small garden next spring. We got baby chicks this spring (started laying close to a month ago), and now we have been having fresh eggs for breakfast just about daily. :-)

              I definitely need to do more with bone broths and organ meats. Thanks for bringing that up.
              We have 5 acres, but haven't had time to develop it, or for fruit to actually grow on our bushes and trees. But, we eat a LOT of dandelions and nettle. They are free and very, very nutrient dense. They make great tea, and I love cooked nettle. The nettle probably doesn't grow in New Mexico, though, huh? But, the fact remains that there are often yummy, nutrient-dense foods growing without any work on your property. I found this webpage about wild edibles in Colorado, and some may grow in your area (Edible Plants of Colorado - Wild Edible Plants). I suggest getting into growing berries (strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries) if they will grow on your property. You get a lot of bang for your buck with relatively little maintenance (especially the blackberries and raspberries!). And they are yummy, as well as very nutrient dense!

              I also second supplementing with potatoes. I'd go for sweet potatoes over normal ones, since you don't have to worry about the fungicides, etc. that are on non-organic potatoes, as well as the inflammation that may occur if you are sensitive to nightshades (not everyone is, but for some people, night shades cause joint pain). Sweet potatoes are nutrient powerhouses, and have none of the potential downsides of regular potatoes.

              Rice is also good and cheap, and adds variety and bulk to the meal. It doesn't add much in the way nutrition, but if you have other cheap nutrient-dense (organ meats, bone broths, sweet potatoes, wild edible plants, etc), you don't really need to worry about it.

              I also agree with avoiding the non-grass-fed/non-organic beef, especially since you're feeding your family. They don't need those hormones messing them up!

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              • #22
                But if you're supplementing with carbs for budgetary reasons, sweet potatoes are not a cheap option, more's the pity.

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                • #23
                  Berries!! Yes, we should grow berries. :-) The land is not the best here. It's kind of like a living in a large sandbox with some weeds sprouting out. A good friend of mine planted a pretty decent sized garden this year and it did really well though. The monsoon season was great this year, so that definitely helped.

                  So, I'm trying to think of some "easy to grow" stuff. Berries, tomatoes, zucchini, etc. What other easy to grow stuff should I keep in mind?

                  Oh, and after living in the Midwest and seeing the land COVERED in dandelions my entire life, I have not seen one, not one, on or near my property here!

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                  • #24
                    Here is how I would do it:

                    More canned meat: oysters, salmon, and tuna especially
                    More eggs: at 2 dollars a dozen this is a no brainer. Thats like 1$/meal in our house.
                    Continue eating offal even if cafo: CAFO offal is better than no offal. And that type is particularly less expensive.
                    SOUP AND BROTHS: This is how our ancestors stretched a buck (pun intended). Make it and serve it with every meal. Buy a whole chicken (99c/lb usually). Cook it and use its bones for broth. EVERY MEAL this should be one of the courses or main course.
                    Save your fat: You should be choosing the fatty cuts. They have more energy for the cost and are congruent with primal anyhow. Save the fat! Never waste that. Use it for cooking your leaner stuff, eggs, or veggies in.
                    Forage or garden: When gardening choose stuff that you can plant easily from seed in your area. Those are the real money savers. As for foraging...just do it. If you are really hard up knock on doors and offer to remove some fruit from peoples yard/trees. I saw a few people picking apples and pears from my trees the other day and I just let em have it. I figured I can't get to all of it anyhow....so I let all the kids and neighbors have their fill. Most others who have fruit trees feel the same way, but its still nice to ask

                    Thats how I would do primal on a budget. In fact thats how I do primal now, except I buy all the highest quality stuff and even some silly stuff I really don't need.
                    Last edited by Neckhammer; 09-29-2013, 07:25 AM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by cantare View Post
                      Lightweight!

                      They keep fine in the freezer...I'll take your $17 any time you wanna come over.
                      ... I never thought of putting nuts in the freezer. I am totally going to do this now. I can't really taste the difference but I'm sure my nuts have gone rancid.
                      Out of context quote for the day:

                      Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by pollo_la View Post
                        Berries!! Yes, we should grow berries. :-) The land is not the best here. It's kind of like a living in a large sandbox with some weeds sprouting out. A good friend of mine planted a pretty decent sized garden this year and it did really well though. The monsoon season was great this year, so that definitely helped.

                        So, I'm trying to think of some "easy to grow" stuff. Berries, tomatoes, zucchini, etc. What other easy to grow stuff should I keep in mind?

                        Oh, and after living in the Midwest and seeing the land COVERED in dandelions my entire life, I have not seen one, not one, on or near my property here!
                        What a shame, I harvesed the local dandelions this year... until the city sprayed them, the bastards. x_x Hmm, easy to grow... rhubarb! That is SO easy and if you look online there are savory recipes for it, not just sweets. I made this rhubarb chicken and it was to die for.
                        Out of context quote for the day:

                        Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by pollo_la View Post
                          Berries!! Yes, we should grow berries. :-) The land is not the best here. It's kind of like a living in a large sandbox with some weeds sprouting out. A good friend of mine planted a pretty decent sized garden this year and it did really well though. The monsoon season was great this year, so that definitely helped.

                          So, I'm trying to think of some "easy to grow" stuff. Berries, tomatoes, zucchini, etc. What other easy to grow stuff should I keep in mind?

                          Oh, and after living in the Midwest and seeing the land COVERED in dandelions my entire life, I have not seen one, not one, on or near my property here!
                          I don't really know what grows well in New Mexico. Goodness, I'm still trying to figure out how to grow in the Pacific Northwest, and I've lived here my whole life, and we've got good soil!

                          I've been reading this woman's blog and website for ideas on how to live more frugally. Anyway, she lives in Utah and still manages to have an amazing garden, with grapes, fruit trees, onions, berries, veggies, etc. Maybe you could get some tips from her site? Here's pictures of her garden Edible Landscaping, and here's a list of what she grows and when she plants it: Garden Calendar. I found this list of foods to grow in New Mexico, too: Home Vegetable Gardening in New Mexico, and this person has a list of foods they easily grow: Local Food Albuquerque - Special vegetables for New Mexico. I guess nettle CAN grow there!

                          I would start with what grows really easily, and move from there!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Aldergirl View Post
                            I don't really know what grows well in New Mexico. Goodness, I'm still trying to figure out how to grow in the Pacific Northwest, and I've lived here my whole life, and we've got good soil!

                            I've been reading this woman's blog and website for ideas on how to live more frugally. Anyway, she lives in Utah and still manages to have an amazing garden, with grapes, fruit trees, onions, berries, veggies, etc. Maybe you could get some tips from her site? Here's pictures of her garden Edible Landscaping, and here's a list of what she grows and when she plants it: Garden Calendar. I found this list of foods to grow in New Mexico, too: Home Vegetable Gardening in New Mexico, and this person has a list of foods they easily grow: Local Food Albuquerque - Special vegetables for New Mexico. I guess nettle CAN grow there!

                            I would start with what grows really easily, and move from there!
                            Thanks! :-)

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                            • #29
                              Cantare

                              Originally posted by cantare View Post
                              I'm often amazed how much can be saved by researching online and buying in bulk, even with 'luxury' foods. Most recent example: the "mammoth" pecan halves I use on salads etc. clocked in at over $17/lb at Safeway. After going through the entire Georgia Pecan Growers' Board list and checking prices, I got 30lbs direct from Schermer Pecan Farm in Ga...$7/lb with free shipping. Not local, but for 60% off I'll take it.


                              Your stats are impressive! Congrats on your success!!

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