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  • The myth of “a broken metabolism”…

    An article related to the bs of a so called “broken metabolism that I found interesting;

    The Fallacy of the Underfed Metabolism - Leanness Lifestyle University Blog

    Also a scientific article about the evolution of very low calorie diets (VLCD);

    The Evolution of Very-Low-Calorie Diets: An Update and Meta-analysis - Tsai - 2012 - Obesity - Wiley Online Library
    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

    - Schopenhauer

  • #2
    I think the objective, based on the first link, would then be to increase your BMR as much as possible and I don't think low-calorie diets encourage that; they only encourage further slowing due to our survival mechanism. Sometimes I think we sacrifice internal health for external results and lay the foundation for problems in the future.
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    • #3
      This is a great article. I've found the #1 killer of weight loss is "excuses."

      I also agree weight loss should be paired with heavy weight training and regular cardio. It is a lot easier to consume 1,600 kcal with a TDEE of 2,100 kcal a day than it is to consume 1,000 kcal with a TDEE of 1,500 kcal a day. Maximizing your total daily energy expenditure, especially through weight training, is a great way to make a calorie deficit more easily maintained and ensure the weight you DO lose is fat and not muscle.
      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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      • #4
        He doesn't say how she "checked" her RMR at a local university, but admits that her metabolism slowed 16% when she decreased her daily caloric intake. What do you claim this proves? Do you really think her RMR is a constant? Do you really think the number of calories her body is willing to expend during exercise is a constant and can be calculated from a formula, or the calorie ticker on the stairmaster? Seems like the evidence supports the opposite of his conclusion, if anything.
        The Champagne of Beards

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        • #5
          Her RMR was much lower than the average predicted. They did not measure her RMR after she started eating the whooping 1100 cals a day. The only thing that it shows is that the RMR calculators are very inaccurate for women.
          My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
          When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Leida View Post
            the RMR calculators are very inaccurate
            This is the conclusion I would have drawn from his little n=1 experiment. Not that she was a liar and secret donut eater.
            The Champagne of Beards

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
              He doesn't say how she "checked" her RMR at a local university, but admits that her metabolism slowed 16% when she decreased her daily caloric intake. What do you claim this proves? Do you really think her RMR is a constant? Do you really think the number of calories her body is willing to expend during exercise is a constant and can be calculated from a formula, or the calorie ticker on the stairmaster? Seems like the evidence supports the opposite of his conclusion, if anything.
              The real answer is: it doesn't matter.

              The best way to achieve and maintain weight loss is through routine. Develop a healthy lifestyle you can do day-in-day-out and you will probably be successful. I follow the same damn routine every damn day.

              Monday thru Friday I work. The work week is usually around 45 hours plus commute.
              Monday I go to the gym and deadlift with accessory movements for 1 hour.
              Tuesday I go to the gym and do some moderate cardio if it's raining and cold or do it outside if it's nice out.
              Wednesday I go to the gym and benchpress with accessory movements for 1 hour.
              Thursday is a repeat of Tuesday.
              Friday I go the gym and do squats with accessory movements for 1 hour.
              Saturday is accessory day at the gym - chin-ups, dips, curls, calf raises and forearm work - for 1 hour.
              Sunday I usually take off and watch football or go for a walk.

              Every day at work I eat the same lunch - a salad with some type of meat. I use the same vegetables with little differentiation. I use the same container so it's always the same size.

              Dinner is always meat and vegetables when I'm not lifting and lean meat with heavy starch and a generous dessert after lifting.

              I usually allow alcohol for myself once a week, though I find myself using that allowance less and less as I age.

              That's it. The same foods, the same work schedule, the same hours, the same routine. And this is what successful people do. The more random your life is, the harder it will be to control and build a lifestyle you can maintain. Chaos leads to lack of sleep, overeating comfort foods and lots of takeout. Experiment with your routine over and over until you find one that works and you ENJOY so you can maintain it HAPPILY.

              It also makes it a lot easier to make changes. Instead of obsessively calculating my calories, I'll just make a slightly smaller salad and buy leaner meats for awhile. Easy, because I know what I eat every day. Know your diet and your body. If you can't tell me how much you eat on average or how much you can lift on average, I bet you have considerable room for improvement.
              Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 09-25-2013, 12:14 PM.
              Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                The best way to achieve and maintain weight loss is through routine.
                Wrong. It's all about calories in vs. calories out. It doesn't matter if you eat 1200 kCal of potatoes one day, 1200 kCal of steak the next, 1200 of orange juice the next, 1200 of buttercoffee the next. Routine has absolutely nothing to do with it.
                The Champagne of Beards

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                  Wrong. It's all about calories in vs. calories out. It doesn't matter if you eat 1200 kCal of potatoes one day, 1200 kCal of steak the next, 1200 of orange juice the next, 1200 of buttercoffee the next. Routine has absolutely nothing to do with it.
                  +1. And I'll add that it doesn't matter if you eat 2400 calories one day and zero the next because you lose weight over time, not at a moment in time.

                  The only thing about the first article I didn't like was that it implied it was true for everyone. If I couldn't lose weight on 1100-1200 calories a day, I'd see a doctor before I assumed that I was inadvertently forgetting to count a donut. Also, I thought the exercise thing was also a variable. IOW some sedentary people can lose weight and others absolutely have to move. But I might have read the second thing wrong somewhere.
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                  • #10
                    Routine and CICO don't mean shit if you've got chronically elevated stress hormones that cause you to eat your own muscle and store all food as fat.

                    I was on a month long plateau which I broke by stopping all intense cardio and lowering my protein intake For some people, it's all down to hormones.

                    "Broken metabolism" sounds like a crock, but I could buy "hormonal imbalances".
                    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                    - Ray Peat

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                      Wrong. It's all about calories in vs. calories out. It doesn't matter if you eat 1200 kCal of potatoes one day, 1200 kCal of steak the next, 1200 of orange juice the next, 1200 of buttercoffee the next. Routine has absolutely nothing to do with it.
                      What if your routine is calories in calories out?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by statikcat View Post
                        What if your routine is calories in calories out?
                        Then you will be really bored living in your metabolic chamber, but whatever floats your boat.
                        The Champagne of Beards

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                        • #13
                          I agree many folks hastily self-diagnose this sort of thing. A true "slow metabolism" would also reduce appetite by the same margin so the real question is how appetite and expenditure become misaligned.
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                          • #14
                            I dunno, I just feel bad for us, womenfolk. Eating 800 cals a day, at age 50, and a height of 5'6", while on antibiotics for an infection and still working out 45 min a day. And still being overweight, while the 'coach' gloats over how eating more is not a good idea. Might as well sock him in the eye and go eat doughnuts.
                            My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                            When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichMahogany View Post
                              Wrong. It's all about calories in vs. calories out. It doesn't matter if you eat 1200 kCal of potatoes one day, 1200 kCal of steak the next, 1200 of orange juice the next, 1200 of buttercoffee the next. Routine has absolutely nothing to do with it.
                              Did you even read my post?

                              It becomes impossible to accurately calculate CICO when you live a completely random, chaotic lifestyle. Your entire initial point was that it's difficult to accurately measure the 'CO' part of the equation. The only way to do it is to take in a large deficit, which isn't optimal. The best way to assure a deficit is to keep a stable TDEE, and you do that through ROUTINE.
                              Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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