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Opinions on raw honey, pre/post workout?

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  • Opinions on raw honey, pre/post workout?

    I've been taking in extra carbs on workout days. Anyone use raw honey pre and/or post workout. to refuel?

  • #2
    Too much fructose.
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    • #3
      If you were going to consume raw honey, I would say around a workout would be best because of increased insulin sensitivity, but most people will say no because of the high sugar, specifically fructose, content of honey.
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      In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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      • #4
        What EGY said.

        If you're going to eat honey regardless, then around workouts is the best time.

        But if it's a carb boost you're after, there are better choices (sweet potatoes, winter squash, etc.)
        Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

        Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

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        • #5
          From the perspective of health and well being, is there any real need for pre and post workout drinks?

          Emptying your glycogen stores periodical seems like a good thing as it improves your insulin sensitivity. I generally eat something fatty with protein post workout, which is the opposite of what body-builders generally advise (carbs and protein + spike your insulin in the post workout window).

          I'm wondering if there really a huge difference / need to have a high carb source post workout if your focus is health?
          Last edited by andalus; 05-06-2010, 08:47 AM.

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          • #6
            it's being said that a 4:1 carbs to protein post workout might be beneficial. Based on studies funded by the companies that sell post work energy products... of course

            I've been trying with and without... Felt the same...
            What really helps me is a copious meal with alot of proteins and fat (read a whole chicken at the rotiseie let's say) with avocados and some spinach around it. And this, few hours AFTER the workout.

            The whole "scientific" approach on the energy and sports fueling, for me is more like 99% marketing...

            Think a bit... Grok wasn't fat... at all. He might had fasted for days. Now he and his gang is hunting this bison... a combination of a persistence hunt + tactics + spears. After another day, they are back at the grotto carrying 4000 lb of fat and meat. Then, they feast... So, it makes sense to me...

            If we needed second precision feeding and exact ratios of nutrients, pre, post, whatever, we would be extinct as a species. This is just marketing bullschlacht...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by andalus View Post
              From the perspective of health and well being, is there any real need for pre and post workout drinks?

              I'm wondering if there really a huge difference / need to have a high carb source post workout if your focus is health?
              I think the importance of pre/post workout nutrition (or, on the other end of the spectrum, pre/post workout fasting) is highly dependent on one's goals. If you're trying to build muscle, then eat. If you're trying to lose weight, fasting may be the way to go. Volume and intensity matter, too -- light-to-moderate exercisers don't need as much food, or as careful a pre/post wo regimin, as devoted athletes.
              Nightlife ~ Chronicles of Less Urban Living, Fresh from In the Night Farm ~ Idaho's Primal Farm! http://inthenightlife.wordpress.com/

              Latest post: Stop Being Stupid

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              • #8
                Why eat carbs when your body is perfectly capable of making its own out of protein and fat? Why monkey with your insulin and blood glucose unnecessarily? I fast before and after most workouts, don't usually eat until evening, and the only carbs I encounter are incidental from dark green veg or nuts. I have no problem gaining muscle, losing fat and maintaining energy, unless I fast for more than 24 hours at a time.

                After all, it's not like Grok was raiding a beehive or a fruit orchard every time he broke a sweat.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Timothy View Post
                  Why eat carbs when your body is perfectly capable of making its own out of protein and fat? Why monkey with your insulin and blood glucose unnecessarily? I fast before and after most workouts, don't usually eat until evening, and the only carbs I encounter are incidental from dark green veg or nuts. I have no problem gaining muscle, losing fat and maintaining energy, unless I fast for more than 24 hours at a time.

                  After all, it's not like Grok was raiding a beehive or a fruit orchard every time he broke a sweat.
                  Grok wasn't trying to build massive amounts of muscle and deadlift, say 600 pounds either.

                  And to answer your first question. If protein is going to be turned into glucose anyways, why not eat carbs in the first place?

                  My goodness I hate how obsessive people have become about this Grok crap. It's all about your priorities.
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                  • #10
                    I agree; Grok wasn't concerned with hitting an arbitrary deadlift target or building up muscle for show. He was concerned with surviving all the functional challenges of his environment.

                    The reason to avoid dietary carbs is to train your body to produce its own. When I ate carbs all the time, I had virtually no ability to keep up my blood glucose without them, making me a slave to constant meals, the insulin rollercoaster, and all the hormonal side effects. Having tried it both ways, there's no way I'd go back.

                    Referring to Grok's environment -- or the environment of evolutionary adaptation, if you don't like the "Grok" meme -- is a valid method for understanding why our bodies work the way they do. I'm sorry that you feel hatred about that, but the OP asked for our opinions.
                    Last edited by Timothy; 05-06-2010, 11:30 AM.

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                    • #11
                      The pre/post workout thing is interesting to me. As a type 1 diabetic, I have found that if I don't eat a bit of fruit or something (we're talking less than 15g carbs) prior to a particularly intense workout (CrossFit or weightlifting), my blood sugar actually RISES about 100 points afterward. (I think it's because my body is freaking out about the lack of sugar in my bloodstream and releasing emergency stores, combined with the stress of such a workout.)

                      Conversely, my blood sugar drops if I am doing something less-adrenaline raising, like yoga or pilates or light cardio, whether or not I've eaten before.

                      It's hard for me to know how my experiences relate to someone with a regular "normal" pancreas, but I wonder sometimes if it offers any insight to people who don't regularly check their blood sugar levels. This is something I've been looking into.
                      www.dontcallmesugar.wordpress.com

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                      • #12
                        I generally fast 16-24 hours before workouts, but lately I've been eating a few tablespoons of greek yogurt mixed with a tablespoon or two of raw honey fifteen minutes before working out, with the idea being to fill liver glycogen (since fructose hits the liver first).

                        I'm not sure if it's actually doing anything, but my performance has certainly increased.

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                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=erik.cisler;110582]I generally fast 16-24 hours before workouts, but lately I've been eating a few tablespoons of greek yogurt mixed with a tablespoon or two of raw honey fifteen minutes before working out, with the idea being to fill liver glycogen (since fructose hits the liver first).

                          I'm not sure if it's actually doing anything, but my performance has certainly increased.[/QUOTE]

                          Then it's probably doing something haha
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                          In Pursuit of Healthiness, Only to Achieve Happiness!: www.livingnotsurviving.com

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