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  • What about mushrooms?

    Hey all,

    I live in Estonia (a tiny country in Europe ner Russia). And we have a strong traditions of gathering mushrooms in the woods. Just yesterday I got a mighty pile of fresh mushrooms (+best Grok's excercise - walking in the woods for 3 hours). But since I am realtively new to Paleo lifestyle I couldn't find information about mushrooms on the website. Logically they are supposed to be OK - since a gathered them But just to make sure - does anyone here likes to eat some mushrooms and is it OK to do so?
    Thank you in advance,

    Natalja
    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread94235.html
    Starting weight (1.Sep 2013): 88.1 kg
    Current weight: 84.6 kg
    Goal weight: 66 kg
    Goal for 2013: lose 10 kg and keep loosing it

  • #2
    Hello, welcome
    Yes, mushrooms are primal big time!! And as a French, I can only recommend you eat as many varieties as you can

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    • #3
      Hey.

      I long as you know they are safe to eat (that is they are not poisonous mushrooms or toadstools), mushrooms are totally primal. A good source of protein and also they apparently create vitamin d if you leave them in the sun for a while before eating

      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0422132801.htm
      If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

      Originally posted by tfarny
      If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

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      • #4
        I sadly don't eat a huge variety, as I wouldn't feel safe picking here. There's too many poisonous that look similar to the edible ones, to the untrained eye.

        But I love mushrooms, they're very tasty
        Go for it!

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        • #5
          Absolutely. I often have mushrooms for breakfast with my eggs. But they are mere supermarket specimens and I envy you being able to gather wild mushrooms. Enjoy
          Annie Ups the Ante
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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          • #6
            Eat all the mushrooms or send them to me. I love mushrooms and I love collecting mushrooms. I have a few I can reliably identify myself, otherwise I have a mushroom expert friend I can consult with. We collected inky caps, agaricus and porcinis together recently. On my own, I collect puffballs and chanterelles.
            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by natashik85 View Post
              Hey all,

              I live in Estonia (a tiny country in Europe ner Russia). And we have a strong traditions of gathering mushrooms in the woods. Just yesterday I got a mighty pile of fresh mushrooms (+best Grok's excercise - walking in the woods for 3 hours). But since I am realtively new to Paleo lifestyle I couldn't find information about mushrooms on the website. Logically they are supposed to be OK - since a gathered them But just to make sure - does anyone here likes to eat some mushrooms and is it OK to do so?
              Thank you in advance,

              Natalja
              I would not eat mushrooms from Estonia due to contamination. The safest mushrooms are the ones actually grown in a greenhouse, unfortunately. But if you are unconcerned about that then. Yes.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by KathyH View Post
                I would not eat mushrooms from Estonia due to contamination. The safest mushrooms are the ones actually grown in a greenhouse, unfortunately. But if you are unconcerned about that then. Yes.
                What kind of contamination? I am (originally) from that area as well and have picked and eaten wild mushrooms all my life. I would understand not eating wild mushrooms that are picked in highly industrial/polluted areas, but many forests in Baltic states/Scandinavia etc. are far from pollution sources and I would bet those mushrooms have much less contamination than greenhouse ones...
                Enjoy your mushrooms, Natashik, while they last

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by inesenite View Post
                  What kind of contamination? I am (originally) from that area as well and have picked and eaten wild mushrooms all my life. I would understand not eating wild mushrooms that are picked in highly industrial/polluted areas, but many forests in Baltic states/Scandinavia etc. are far from pollution sources and I would bet those mushrooms have much less contamination than greenhouse ones...
                  Enjoy your mushrooms, Natashik, while they last
                  radiation

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                  • #10
                    Commercially grown mushrooms are grown not in greenhouses but in caves or abandoned coal mines, or someplace similarly cave-like.

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                    • #11
                      For me, you haven't lived until you've collected a few pounds of morels on a spring morning, taken them home and sauteed them in butter, then some fresh eggs....

                      so long as you are versed in ID of them in your area, it's a great way to get free food
                      "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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                      • #12
                        There was a mushroom farm where I grew up. The farm was in big warehouse-like buildings. The inside of the buildings looked a bit like this farm: Mushroom Farm - YouTube

                        This farm seems to have a cinderblock building- maybe because it's in a warmer area? Where I grew up it just looks like shed material.
                        In God we trust; all others must bring data. W. Edwards Deming
                        Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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                        • #13
                          I visited Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania extensively in the mid-90's as part of a team looking at the Baltic states after the collapse of the Soviet Union for inclusion in NATO. We did quite a few environmental assessments. all I can say, is politics aside, those are beautiful countries with pristine landscapes--I would eat any edible mushroom I found there unless from an obviously contaminated site. There are huge expanses of untouched forests--a real site to see. They dig up huge chunks of Amber right out of the ground where it has laid for millions of years undisturbed.

                          Mushrooms of considerable importance in this area are Boletes (Bolete - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) and Inonotis Obliquus (Inonotus obliquus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia) The former a great food source and the latter a promising cure for cancer and diabetes--made traditionally into a tea rather than eaten.

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                          • #14
                            I was curious because I thought the agricultural contamination issue was basically over... And it is in turned over crop lands, thought I think the EU still requires radiation screening. So worrying about the mushrooms I don't think would be totally crazy: you don't have the turn over that agricultural lands have had, and you probably aren't doing any screening...
                            In God we trust; all others must bring data. W. Edwards Deming
                            Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
                              For me, you haven't lived until you've collected a few pounds of morels on a spring morning, taken them home and sauteed them in butter, then some fresh eggs....

                              so long as you are versed in ID of them in your area, it's a great way to get free food
                              We gathered mushrooms with my grandmother and my father as children. They had the most wonderful delicate woodsy flavor and a fabulous texture. Even though we picked different varieties, they had those similar undertones, probably the soil. I wish I had paid more attention to which ones to pick. I may need to do some homework.

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