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  • #16
    Do you have a realistic view of what you should weigh and look like? Many people don't. http://www.bmi-calculator.net/body-f...-fat-chart.php may give you a better idea of what your "ideal" weight (based on safe bodyfat levels) actually is.
    Primal eating in a nutshell: If you are hungry, eat Primal food until you are satisfied (not stuffed). Then stop. Wait until you're hungry again. Repeat.

    Looking for my Cholesterol Primer? Here it is: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...mer-(Attempt-2)


    Ditch the scale!: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread33283.html

    My Success Story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread30615.html

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    • #17
      super good info here. Thank you everyone

      I do not think of myself as fat. I don't worry about it that much. I only care when I can't fit into my clothes. Honestly, that makes me "feel" fatter faster than anything the mirror gives back to me. I think most of us can agree with that.

      I hold muscle easily. In all honesty I look a lot more like that sprinter picture than Paula Radcliffe even with all the endurance. There is a "bod pod" coming to our gym in 2 weeks and though there's a price tag to it, I'm thinking of doing it for the BF and metabolism measure.

      I have done the thyroid tests-everything comes out normal. the only thing semi abnormal with my blood tests was that for a fasting blood test of 12 hours I had a glucose level of 100 which they said was high.

      I realize I do way more cardio than PB suggests. it just seems backwards to me that I clean up the diet and I gain weight. I go back to CW eating my gluten and insulin producting foods and I lose it-I just feel like crap-thats a pretty big tradeoff!

      I am not overestimating my food. I measure and weigh and am careful about how I enter the portion sizes. I'm lucky to hit 1400 cals. I'm with Suki on that one-there is no way this is too much with what I do.

      MalPaz probably has it right but I'm full a lot. I have trouble getting more in. If I add more fat, I add more weight. Its ridiculous. Maybe I need to play with the ratios? There was an athlete on here once who was going to experiment with adding more starchy veg. to increase carbs because this was happening to her too. she had done well in the past with that and thought it might help. I wonder what happened with that.

      I don't have an accurate way to track BF so that stinks cuase that would help a lot. I am 5'5, 133-which is around 21 BMI. not discounting that its a good normal number. Just don't like to see things going in the wrong direction. I'm good with just keeping the status quo!! I started PB around 126

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      • #18
        You say that your thyroid tests came out 'normal'--that's what doctors told me for 5 years when I was hypo the entire time. Do you know your TSH, T4, and T3 numbers? If you don't, then you don't know whether or not you are 'normal.'

        That high glucose reading is also interesting, since hypothyroidism untreated will raise blood glucose. Many undiagnosed hypos wind up being diagnosed as type 2 diabetics down the road when the real problem is their thyroid.

        Finally, in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (the most common kind), it is common for a person to have symptoms well before the blood values are at abnormal levels.

        I'm not saying you're hypo; I just want to point out that, as many, many women have discovered, it's a complex issue.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by emmie View Post
          You say that your thyroid tests came out 'normal'--that's what doctors told me for 5 years when I was hypo the entire time. Do you know your TSH, T4, and T3 numbers? If you don't, then you don't know whether or not you are 'normal.'

          That high glucose reading is also interesting, since hypothyroidism untreated will raise blood glucose. Many undiagnosed hypos wind up being diagnosed as type 2 diabetics down the road when the real problem is their thyroid.

          Finally, in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (the most common kind), it is common for a person to have symptoms well before the blood values are at abnormal levels.

          I'm not saying you're hypo; I just want to point out that, as many, many women have discovered, it's a complex issue.
          The ultra senstitive TSH was 1.99 with a range of .40-4.2 as normal
          T4 .64 with a range of .61-1.45

          no other tests besides those were done for that. this was also over a year ago.

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          • #20
            Your T4 is barely in range. Since it's been over a year I would suggest being retested. This time request TSH, free T4 and free T3. I would also want glucose retested since "they" said your levels were high a year ago.

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            • #21
              Ditto on the Thyroid. I was a professional track runner I would eat 1200 calories at the most....was not underweight, was not loosing weight and would fight to keep weight off, and i had low thyroid. My thyroid was not even out of range by much at all, but it was enough. According to your numbers I would say that your numbers then were too low. Read up on http://stopthethyroidmadness.com before you go to the Dr. so you know exactly what to have tested. Good Luck!

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              • #22
                trikate,

                I've also had a similar experience. I'm 5'6, and I started at 129, and now I'm somewhere above 140 (I refuse to weigh myself until I feel better). The weight gain happened suddenly, in the month of January, one month in to the diet change. I've been very proactive about my health, so this was a surprise. Like, you, I'm still a healthy weight, but I don't fit into my clothes, and I'm pudgy where I never was before. I was lucky to see a doctor who sent me to have my thyroid antibodies tested. Sure enough, I'm positive, and I have FreeT3's that are low, out of the normal range. This points to Hashimoto's. I am seeking an endocrinologist who will help me now and hope to feel better soon.

                Do you have any other hypothyroid symptoms?

                Good luck, and be sure to include thyroid autoantibodies tested along with FT3s and FT4s.

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                • #23
                  Wow you all, it's like you're answering questions that I hadn't even asked! Thanks for being honest trikate, you're helping everyone

                  I was at 128 at my lightest last year (I'm only 5'2", and that was a great weight/leanness for me), and somehow over the last year I'm now at 149 today and I want to punch someone/something. I feel SO much better without the grains/gluten, but my diet was exceptionally CW "clean" before to the point of making my own bread and yogurt to get away from industrial ingredients. Dropping grains and most dairy leaned me out at first last July, but I have steadily gained since January even though I've been walking more/doing bodyweight and kettlebell stuff 2-3 times per week/pilates a couple of times per week, getting my sleep, etc....Now I'm off to learn more about Hashimoto's because I do not feel like battling a freaking thyroid issue!
                  You are what you eat,
                  and what you eat eats too - Michael Pollan

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                  • #24
                    Make sure the doctor tests your T3--that's the important hormone. A lot of doctors only test T4 because they learned in medical school that T4 converts in the body to T3--which it does in healthy people. When I was first diagnosed, I only needed Levoxyl (T4) because I was converting. I have Hashimoto's. My doctor checked both T4 and T3 every four months.

                    After about 4 years, I suddenly had a problem with T3--and gained 10 lbs in 2 weeks! That's how powerful T3 is in regulating your body. Fortunately, this happened just a week before my regular blood test, so when my endo added Cytomel (T3), the weight gain stopped.

                    My T3 was lower than the lab range at that point, but any number lower than half the lab range will probably cause weight gain or stalls.

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                    • #25
                      There is a great book: Why do I still have thyroid symptoms when my tests come back normal?
                      Or close to that-its on Amazon. It also hits on the grains/diet connection to thyroid.

                      I would say to the OP, you could stand to eat more. Have you read the Paleo Diet for Athletes? close concept to PB...soryy though I agree with most here I dont agress necessarily in the 'chronic cardio'...I love to run and compete in marathons and I won't give that up nor can I see how that is bad for me....I just have added some weights and resistance training to the running and feel great...I also found I was not eating enough and have results now adding more food, but not carby food, unless right after a long hard workout.
                      Sometimes I eat a whole avocado which is something Id never do before, add calories, doesnt make you feel bloated, tastes great and healthy.

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                      • #26
                        Here is my line. Have you tried IFing at all? Perhaps condensing the times that you eat and giving your body a chance to just burn fat reserves would help you. I don't mean reduce your caloric intake, but to change the times that you eat. I'm a big fan of it and it works for me.
                        http://www.facebook.com/daemonized

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                        • #27
                          Thank you, thank you everyone!

                          I am going to ask for a retest on the thyroid because I do have other hypo symptoms (once I looked it up). this is something i've battled a while now and I always feel very "abnormal" compared to all my other fitness freak friends. I simply cannot eat like they can (nor do I want to anymore now that i've found PB!)

                          I actually started with Paleo for Athletes and it was fine but I was still getting joint problems so when i cut out the "other stuff" that Paleo allows but PB doesn't....I felt a lot better.

                          I frequently eat whole avocados too

                          But yes, I've heard you all and now I feel like I at least have some ammo in my pocket to play with! Thanks so much! I will update if I ever find out anything.

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                          • #28
                            So I'm doing some digging and there was this interview with Dr. Raymond Peat. Here is one of his responses to a question...

                            Dr. Ray Peat: I'm not sure who introduced the term "aerobic" to describe the state of anaerobic metabolism that develops during stressful exercise, but it has had many harmful repercussions. In experiments, T3 production is stopped very quickly by even "sub-aerobic" exercise, probably becaue of the combination of a decrease of blood glucose and an increase in free fatty acids. In a healthy person, rest will tend to restore the normal level of T3, but there is evidence that even very good athletes remain in a hypothyroid state even at rest. A chronic increase of lactic acid and cortisol indicates that something is wrong. The "slender muscles" of endurance runners are signs of a catabolic state, that has been demonstrated even in the heart muscle. A slow heart beat very strongly suggests hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid people, who are likely to produce lactic acid even at rest, are especially susceptible to the harmful effects of "aerobic" exercise. The good effect some people feel from exercise is probably the result of raising the body temperature; a warm bath will do the same for people with low body temperature.


                            ....this is interesting to me and raises some questions that maybe somebody can answer:

                            Low heart rate. I've always prided myself on this and thought I had a "fit" heart. My resting HR is currently 43-45. My max heart rate is 171. I have never seen it go over that. I'm 32 years old, I should have a higher max heart rate. Is this indicative-or could it be of hypothyroidism?

                            High cholesterol and triglycerides. In this same interview he mentioned that (females especially) who are hypo also are commonly seen as having high cholesterol levels. I have been eating "health food" my entire life and devoted half my life to nutrition. I have high cholesterol. When my dr gave me that news she said "you need to stop eating junk" LOL. I did laugh outloud at her, don't worry.

                            Aerobic activity: I've spent my whole life in competitive events. I've also spent much of my exercised life overweight! Whats the deal? Did I "damage" myself?

                            When I was 13-15 I went through a bout of anorexia. It was pretty bad-had to be hospitalized for 2 weeks. Could this have triggered anything if I AM hypo?

                            One more thing I know could be a symptom. My regular temperature is often in the 96.0-.9 range. Calling it a fever for me registers another person's "normal" 98.6. But i'm not always cold. I actually overheat quite easily.

                            All this could be nothing too
                            Last edited by trikate; 05-05-2010, 09:52 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Low resting heart rate and high cholesterol can be symptoms of hypothyroidism, Starvation can lead to thyroid conversion problems and/or "euthyroid sick syndrome".

                              You really need thyroid tests to confirm thyroid problems. Again the tests I recommend are TSH, free T4 and free T3. If you suspect an autoimmune component then testing thyroid antibodies is in order.

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                              • #30
                                Yes! One of my symptoms was an extremely low heart rate (that doctors dismissed as 'healthy'). And higher cholesterol is also a sign of untreated hypothyroidism. And, yes, it's possible that starvation can compromise the thyroid, but there are all sorts of other reasons. The reason isn't as important as getting diagnosed and treated. Your body needs those hormones that your thyroid may not be producing.

                                One of the problems with this disease is that the symptoms develop so gradually that you sometimes don't realize how bad you feel--at least that was my experience.

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