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  • #31
    Greek yogurt is my go-to for when I don't feel like eating meat.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

    "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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    • #32
      Originally posted by peril View Post
      Full fat cottage cheese (ie real cottage cheese) is 11% protein by weight. Low fat cottage cheese is little different
      I'm assuming reduced fat cottage cheese has higher protein.

      Tonight I bought some reduced fat cottage cheese ( thinking it was full fat - only noticed when I got home).

      Taste and texture admittedly not as good as full fat but if the protein is in fact much higher then why should not eat it? ( if I don't mind it's taste)
      Is it that it's not healthy ( or as healthy) to consume it ( why? Eg bad processing, junk stuffs added?).
      Is it just against the philosophy of primal, or just not traditional cottage cheese?

      I certainly get plenty of 'primal approved' good fats from many food sources and could do with increasing a bit of protein - what's wrong with reduced fat cottage cheese in this case?

      Genuine question.
      Last edited by EatMoveSleep; 08-19-2013, 04:53 AM.

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      • #33
        Reduced fat cottage cheese is about 12% protein. As I wrote, little different. Derpy is right though, very hard to find cottage cheese with more than 4% fat. Nothing wrong with reduced fat so long as there are no bad ingredients but dairy fat is rich in vitamins so it is a shame to eschew it
        Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

        Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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        • #34
          Originally posted by peril View Post
          Reduced fat cottage cheese is about 12% protein. As I wrote, little different. Derpy is right though, very hard to find cottage cheese with more than 4% fat. Nothing wrong with reduced fat so long as there are no bad ingredients but dairy fat is rich in vitamins so it is a shame to eschew it
          Well if it only one percent more protein then stuff that
          I thought might be double or triple the protein of full fat - I'll continue with full fat cottage.

          Have you seen the new Zero percent fat greek yogurt in the shops? ( yeah crazy I know )
          But the protein is three times that of full fat Greek yogurt and the sugars are lower ( no idea what it tastes like - probably not good).

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          • #35
            I didn't notice that the grass fed yogurt I bought at the farmers market was fat free 'til I got it home. It was delicious. I ate some plain and smeared a whole bunch on top of some baked eggplant that I stuffed with ground lamb and green tomatoes.

            I'm a cheese lover, and never considered them part of my 20. The runnier and stinkier the better. When I go to WFoods, I usually try to get at least one cheese from each: goat, cow, and sheep. And chevre, of course so I can make jewshi, which is lox and chevre wrapped in nori.

            That said, in the context of calories, I limit my intake. Since I suck at small portions, I give myself the occasional cheese day where just about all of my calories come from cheese. Not surprisingly, these days coincide with trips to WFoods.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #36
              Dairy's where I get a bulk of my "not fat and protein". I'm not as technical with my dieting as some of the more esteemed members here, but I haven't noticed anything horribad going on. I'm a particular fan of yogurt, especially strained "Greek" style. It has spoiled me for regular "runny" yogurt, unfortunately. Cheese is also very great. I did not think of parmesan as being a raw milk cheese. This is something I'll have to read into. What's the real benefit of it being raw? I figured making cheese would kind of alter the benefits of raw milk, but maybe I'm wrong.

              Now, take everything I say with the caveat that most of my dairy is conventional, non-hormone treated stuff. All the available organic milk is Ultra Pasturized, which this community has informed me is the pits. Grass-fed is even more difficult to acquire. Raw's illegal. Legalites here apparently do stings, so no herders will even entertain the idea of trading for milk, even if I want to make cheese with it.

              The local health food store will occasionally get grass fed, pasteurized non-homogenized milk. I snatch that up as fast as I can, but as a car-free guy the 12 mile trip is a bit difficult to make regularly.

              Milk is also very addictive. I can easily down a half gallon in a single sitting. Often that's all I'll have for the day, but sometimes not.

              M.

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              • #37
                Scary. I buy raw milk in a hippie store downtown.
                Crohn's, doing SCD

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                • #38
                  Jewshi? Try again.

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                  • #39
                    Is anybody concerned about the effects possible effects of IGF-1?

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                    • #40
                      I normally make my own quark from 1% organic milk (make kefir first, then make the curd separate on very low heat, strain/press away away the liquid).

                      If i do not have this, I buy dry curd 0.4% cottage cheese. It has absolutely nothing added and I prefer the drier texture (that's 22 g protein, 2 g carbs, no fat).

                      I also buy Liberte Greek Yogurt that is like 18 g protein and 6 g carbs, no fat, nothing added.
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by JoanieL View Post

                        I'm a cheese lover, and never considered them part of my 20. The runnier and stinkier the better.

                        That said, in the context of calories, I limit my intake. Since I suck at small portions, I give myself the occasional cheese day where just about all of my calories come from cheese. Not surprisingly, these days coincide with trips to WFoods.
                        I agree that stinkier is better

                        Yeah, it's easier for me to have a cheese day than limit portions. It's a lot easier to eat cheese than meat because meat takes time to cook.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
                          Well if it only one percent more protein then stuff that
                          I thought might be double or triple the protein of full fat - I'll continue with full fat cottage.

                          Have you seen the new Zero percent fat greek yogurt in the shops? ( yeah crazy I know )
                          But the protein is three times that of full fat Greek yogurt and the sugars are lower ( no idea what it tastes like - probably not good).
                          Fat-free greek yogurt is actually pretty good. I usually don't get fat-free anything but I make exception for greek yogurt.

                          But unfortunately, no more greek yogurt for me. On this island, imported Greek yogurt is crazy expensive.. I'd rather go without, spend it on something else (cheese!).

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                          • #43
                            How's milk prices? Making your own isn't really hard.

                            M.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                              How's milk prices? Making your own isn't really hard.

                              M.
                              Milk price is alright. I buy it to to make yogurt for mixing in curries.

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                              • #45
                                I eat cheese almost every day. I finish dinner with a plate of cheeses between 100-200g and a generous glass of red wine. It is my heart tonic (Vitamins A & K2 from the cheese and reveratrol from the wine). Don't bother to correct this misconception - I'm not listening

                                And hard cheeses like cheddar are up to 25% protein, but the vitamins are most important, which is why I don't go near low-fat dairy. I won't pay someone to make my food less nutritious
                                Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                                Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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