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  • Scrambled eggs bad??!!

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    Last edited by Stjimmy12; 10-14-2013, 12:13 PM.

  • #2
    Why is a scrambled egg unsafe?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
      Why is a scrambled egg unsafe?

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      Oxidized cholesterol?

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      • #4
        New one for me and I will continue to eat scrambled eggs.

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        • #5
          I don't know about it. Might be a slight problem if you cook them too dry.
          Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hedonist2 View Post
            I don't know about it. Might be a slight problem if you cook them too dry.
            Too dry? As in over cooked? Who would do that on purpose?

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            • #7
              Scrambled eggs bad??!!

              Originally posted by Hedonist2 View Post
              I don't know about it. Might be a slight problem if you cook them too dry.
              Can't remember where (possibly Donna Gates Body Ecology) I read a warning about overcooking eggs and the suggestion to intentionally undercook them in the pan, then slip them into a bowl and cover with a lid for a few minutes so the last bit of cooking is much lower temperature.

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              • #8
                How much heat do you apply? Scrambled eggs are generally cooked at low temp. I think they're best creamy rather than set anyhow. I can't see a problem unless you're using undue heat
                Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by peril View Post
                  How much heat do you apply? Scrambled eggs are generally cooked at low temp. I think they're best creamy rather than set anyhow. I can't see a problem unless you're using undue heat
                  Yes. Thank you.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Stjimmy12 View Post
                    I've been 3-6 scrambled eggs everyday for the past month or two and just found out its unsafe? Can someone please tell me if this is true or not??
                    What is the source of the info that says it's unsafe?

                    There plenty of info around stating eating eggs, meat and/or fat etc is "unsafe" - but most people here ignore it.

                    Is this 'new' info any different?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
                      What is the source of the info that says it's unsafe?

                      There plenty of info around stating eating eggs, meat and/or fat etc is "unsafe" - but most people here ignore it.

                      Is this 'new' info any different?
                      Fact or Myth: Are Scrambled Eggs Bad For You?
                      Danica Collins |
                      This is a fact.

                      Scrambled eggs are the worst way to eat eggs.

                      Despite what the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other public health organizations may tell you, a well-cooked, scrambled egg is not the healthiest option.

                      The yellow center of the egg, or the yolk, is full of living nutrients that sustain and fortify our cells and organs. But when you cook an egg, exposing it to air and heat at the same time, you are chemically altering its structure. These ingredients are depleted of their life-nourishing properties.

                      Nutrients such as lutein and zeaxanthin, whose many benefits include warding off age-related macular degeneration –a common cause of blindness –, perish in the cooking process.

                      Consider how much we rely on body heat to connect us to body awareness. When our temperature raises above 105 degrees, the alarm bells sound, signaling serious health conditions that need immediate attention. Likewise, when we heat an egg above 105 degrees we are chemically altering the content of the yolk and essentially crossing the line between healthy and harmful.

                      Scrambling your eggs also causes cholesterol oxidation. What in the world is that?

                      When you cut an apple open and leave it out, what happens to it? It turns brown. That’s oxidation, and the same process occurs inside our bodies! When the cholesterol in egg yolk oxidizes, our bodies suffer the consequences.

                      It is not cholesterol we need to avoid, but the oxidized cholesterol in scrambled eggs that is best dodged. Our blood vessels don’t have receptors for cholesterol – a beneficial arrangement that protects us from collecting too much cholesterol in the bloodstream.

                      Our blood vessels do have receptors for oxidized cholesterol, and therein lays the danger.

                      Cholesterol oxidation leads to sticky cholesterol that gradually forms plague around the artery walls, the major precursor to heart disease.

                      So what is the best way to eat eggs? Raw. This advice may seem contrary; we are forever warned against the dangers of salmonella, but we should only avoid eating raw eggs when they come from large commercial egg facilities, all of which engage in confined animal feeding operations, or CAFO’s. Keep in mind that the wide majority of commercially available eggs are produced by CAFO’s.

                      Even eggs labeled “free-range” are not truly free-range. An accurate definition of free-range chickens are chickens who are able to roam free in a pasture and forage for their natural diet of green plants, insects, seeds and worms.

                      The United States definition of “free-range” is merely a chicken that has access to the outside for a couple of minutes a day. This access is often bare concrete, and “access” simply means that the chickens can go outside if they want, but many are cooped up with tens to one hundred thousands of other chickens and never find their way out the door.

                      Free-range does not necessarily mean pasture fed. To make sure you are not eating eggs that come from CAFO’s, purchase organic, free-range eggs from your local health food store or farmer’s market. Remember, eggs from pasture-fed hens have 2/3 more vitamin A, 2 times more omega fats and 7 times more beta-carotene than eggs from non-foraging hens.

                      How to Eat Raw Eggs

                      One option is to blend a whole raw egg into a breakfast smoothie. It is healthiest to eat the egg white and yolk together. If consuming a raw egg is unpalatable, or you are pregnant, eating a soft-boiled egg is the next best option.





                      Read more: http://undergroundhealthreporter.com...#ixzz2cIEDj9Hy
                      Last edited by Stjimmy12; 08-17-2013, 10:04 PM.

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                      • #12
                        I am sorry but I will continue to scramble eggs.

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                        • #13
                          I've always done them sunny-side up on low heat for this reason. Just so the yolk is opaque on the bottom and slightly solid on top, maybe a little runny still.
                          Crohn's, doing SCD

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                          • #14
                            Yeah interesting but it seems like it's nothing to do with scrambling but the cooking the egg at the time and temperature required to make the yolk solid rather than runny.

                            Frying, baking, poaching, omelets can have the same effect ( yolk can be cooked).

                            I like the yolk generally cooked and I eat enough anti oxidant foods ( if is in fact true).

                            It's almost as if they are wanting to make eggs not taste nice to stop people eating eggs


                            PS

                            Their site is sort of biased toward veg ( maybe don't eat meat too????)


                            http://undergroundhealthreporter.com...g-a-vegetarian
                            Benefits of Being A Vegetarian And Lower Your Risk Of Heart Disease

                            To EatMeatorNot To EatMeat

                            Although more studies are needed to confirm beyond a doubt whether the benefits of being a vegetarian are indeed better for your overall health, one thing is certain – a diet that contains more fruits and vegetables will reduce your risk of many chronic diseases.

                            Experts suggest that cutting meat out of your diet even one day a week will have a positive impact on your health.

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                            • #15
                              This presumably would mean that any cooked meat contains oxidised cholesterol? I was under the impression that only burned food has this?
                              Healthy is the new wealthy.

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