Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Primal with MOAR Peat: Food & Hormone Discussion (Ray Peat Followers)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by ToldUzo View Post
    I can see that I eat alsomst everything he recommends (except Coca cola - don't like it - never have). But I would miss starches if I should follow Peat. And what are lychees and sapotas?? Let me eat some "normal" Scandinavian fruits like locally growing apples instead.
    A lot of people who eat Peatly eat starches. He doesn't say NO starches, he recommends moderate to low starch consumption. Potatoes with fat (butter, coconut oil, etc.) being his favorite pick; nixtamalized corn (lime-treated), white rice, and oats being his other choices from best to worst. I still eat starches, usually potatoes and white rice. There is no exact protocol, just a compilation of recommendations.

    Also, there are more fruits than just these few in the images. Those just happen to be some of his popular picks.
    | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

    “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
      And the wheels keep on turning.... from the starch side of the tracks here is Jaminet on the subject:

      Is It Good to Eat Sugar? - Perfect Health Diet | Perfect Health Diet

      Higher Carb Dieting: Pros and Cons - Perfect Health Diet | Perfect Health Diet

      I think the comments section gets really interesting in these little blog posts as you can see both sides hashing things out. I'm sure someone can post the Peat side of the fence here for you to peruse as well. I'm agnostic in carb source myself so no horse to back here.
      Thanks for the links.

      I was LC myself until recently. We moved to a tropical island, everywhere we go are fresh mangoes, watermelon, bananas, soursop, etc.. seemed like a shame to not to eat locally (prior to this, I disliked fruit as I found imported fruits tasteless).

      I'm just wondering if I should make more effort to replace the starch in my diet with fruit. Fruit seems like a more natural food-- you can just pick them off trees and eat... and starch needs to be well-cooked. Having a rice cooker just makes it easy.

      Comment


      • #18
        I'm planning to dive into Peat starting next week. Looking to eat fruit,plantains, and orange juice multiple times each day, and have a starch probably at dinner time (either potato or rice...or pizza ). I'll cook only with grass fed butter and coconut oil, and look to keep PUFAs and added ingredients as low as possible. Ice cream will be my treat of choice, and probably part of my daily diet. My protein will come mostly from gelatin, cheese, organic (hopefully grassfed) milk, and a few times a week shrimp/shellfish/white fish/beef. I'll use sweeteners like raw honey and maple syrup, and I'll try to have chocolate a few times a week.
        Hoping to keep protein high, fat lowish and mostly saturated, and carbs and sugar high.

        I have been playing around with it the last few weeks and have been doing well with it so far. Excited to jump into it soon.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by girlhk View Post
          Thanks for the links.

          I was LC myself until recently. We moved to a tropical island, everywhere we go are fresh mangoes, watermelon, bananas, soursop, etc.. seemed like a shame to not to eat locally (prior to this, I disliked fruit as I found imported fruits tasteless).

          I'm just wondering if I should make more effort to replace the starch in my diet with fruit. Fruit seems like a more natural food-- you can just pick them off trees and eat... and starch needs to be well-cooked. Having a rice cooker just makes it easy.
          Wow, that's amazing girlhk! Hope you're enjoying the island

          STARCH

          Personally, I ditched starch about 6 weeks ago and have not looked back. It made me realise how different to fruit it is as an food and energy source. Starch never filled me up for very long, I could eat huge amounts of it, and often felt a little tired after eating it. And... although I adore it, rice makes me gain weight (unless it's in sushi, for some reason ) Since I ditched starch I have better energy, a satiable appetite, and weirdly, my body scent has changed... I never need deodorant anymore!

          Anyway, those are subjective views. Peat's are:

          - Eating starch, by increasing insulin and lowering the blood sugar, stimulates the appetite, causing a person to eat more
          - Sugar supports metabolism better than starch

          Glycemia, starch, and sugar in context

          Saying that, as J3nn said, starch has a place in a Peat diet if you want it. I still eat sushi
          "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

          In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

          - Ray Peat

          Comment


          • #20
            Sorry, I'll get to the question about fatty fish later, just wanted to share this first:

            FRUIT

            Here's a list of the most healthful (according to Peat).

            Apples, peeled and cooked

            Cherimoya

            Cherries

            Guavas

            Longans

            Lychees

            Olives- lye processed, no sulfites or iron

            Oranges

            Pawpaws

            Pears, peeled and cooked

            Sapotes

            Tangerines

            Watermelon

            Avocado, occasional use

            Lemons

            Limes


            These are just his preferred ones. He leans towards those with avoidable seeds (to avoid gut irritation), and that haven't been subjected to excessive manufacturing processes: Biochemical changes in some tropical fruits during ripening

            He also recommends grape juice and, of course, OJ.

            As with everything, he's very considerate of the hormonal impact of fruit. He considers orange and guava as anti-estrogenic fruits.
            "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

            In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

            - Ray Peat

            Comment


            • #21
              I'm on a roll...

              FATTY FISH

              - His views on fatty fish are basically linked to his views on PUFA. Mammals have a high rate of metabolism, and are composed of saturated fat. Organisms that live at low temperatures and metabolize slowly, such as fish, have PUFA.

              saturated fats solidify at low temperature; beef fat is very stiff at refrigerator temperature, and in a fat fish, such stiffness would be lethal.

              Even some hibernating rodents can stay alive with their body tissues close to the freezing point, and their stored fats have to be unsaturated. When their diet doesn't allow them to store enough polyunsaturated fat, they fail to go into hibernation. This is probably a clue to some of the general biological effects of the PUFA.

              A series of studies about 20 years ago showed that the functions of the thyroid hormone are all inhibited by unsaturated fats, with the inhibition increasing in proportion to the number of unsaturations (double bonds) in the fat molecule.

              When the tissues are saturated with those antithyroid fats, metabolism slows, especially when any stress, such as cold or hunger, increases the concentration of free fatty acids in the blood stream.
              More here: Unsaturated fatty acids: Nutritionally essential, or toxic?

              - Peat believes that isolated fish oil (i.e.. Cod liver oil) suppresses the immune system, thus reducing inflammation by default (which is the reason people feel better when they take them). He's been speaking out against fish oil for years, and lately there is a growing body of evidence to support him (google it)

              More here: The Great Fish Oil Experiment

              ---

              Personally, I was incredulous when I saw that Peat lumped salmon in with other sources of PUFA. Even though I eat Peat-style, I continue to eat salmon. However... lately, I've noticed that after eating it I sometimes feel tired. I'm not getting good quality stuff, so I am considering if it's better just to ditch it, and reserve eating fish for when I can get it super fresh.

              So, I'm not thinking of ditching it because of PUFA fear-mongering, but I'm finding that the longer I eat Peat, the less desirable fish is to me. It's strange... all my tastes seem to be gearing in a specific direction...
              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

              - Ray Peat

              Comment


              • #22
                How is the diagram in the OP broken down? Is it broken down by food volume, or by calories, or by weight?
                Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                Griff's cholesterol primer
                5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                bloodorchid is always right

                Comment


                • #23
                  [QUOTE="God said"]A series of studies about 20 years ago showed that the functions of the thyroid hormone are all inhibited by unsaturated fats, with the inhibition increasing in proportion to the number of unsaturations (double bonds) in the fat molecule.
                  [\QUOTE]
                  References?
                  Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                  Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
                    How is the diagram in the OP broken down? Is it broken down by food volume, or by calories, or by weight?
                    I imagine it's by calories, but I'm not sure. It was made by one of Peat's enthusiasts, not by Peat himself.

                    Originally posted by peril View Post
                    Originally posted by God said
                    A series of studies about 20 years ago showed that the functions of the thyroid hormone are all inhibited by unsaturated fats, with the inhibition increasing in proportion to the number of unsaturations (double bonds) in the fat molecule.
                    [\QUOTE]
                    References?
                    Find them yourself if you need them I don't blindly swallow anyone's research, references or not. I do what makes me feel best.
                    Last edited by YogaBare; 10-05-2013, 10:46 AM.
                    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                    - Ray Peat

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by peril View Post
                      References?
                      Did you check the bottom of the page where it says references?
                      | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

                      “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                        Saying that, as J3nn said, starch has a place in a Peat diet if you want it. I still eat sushi
                        Would it be hilarious if bickering broke out among Peatarians over fruit vs. starch? LOL
                        | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

                        “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by j3nn View Post
                          Would it be hilarious if bickering broke out among Peatarians over fruit vs. starch? LOL
                          One thing I'll say about the Peat forum is that people are really respectful to each other. On the occasion that someone comes in, guns blazing, people respectfully bow out. I always see them saying that "you've got to find what works for you", "no need to try all Peat's suggestions at once", "experiment".

                          This forum has become a blood bath.
                          "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                          In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                          - Ray Peat

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                            One thing I'll say about the Peat forum is that people are really respectful to each other. On the occasion that someone comes in, guns blazing, people respectfully bow out. I always see them saying that "you've got to find what works for you", "no need to try all Peat's suggestions at once", "experiment".

                            This forum has become a blood bath.
                            It happens when anything becomes a religion. I'm diet agnostic. I think all protocols with specific rules are too rigid yet might have some worthy points. It's just a matter of finding what works for you. Cannot believe how seriously some take things like orange juice and kale. It can't be healthy to get that worked up about macronutrients and quantities of food.
                            | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

                            “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              What i eat:
                              - a lot of fruits (usually fruits through out the day and cooked food for dinner; roughly 3-4 bananas, a bowl of cherries, half a medium sized water melon, mangos/jackfruit/papaya/guava based on season and dates)
                              - potatoes (i use it as "base" for cooked food, usually dinner; so baked potato + cheese or eggs or meat)
                              - vegetables (from a selection of broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, kale, tomato, eggplant, etc) and nuts
                              - 2 raw carrots a day
                              - about 2 single espressos with sugar
                              - 1 Lindt 70% chocolate bar a day
                              - a pint of Haagen Daz vanilla ice cream over a week
                              - Meat/Fish/Poultry: no more than 2 or 3 meals a weak

                              No grains.

                              Less meat works better on me. While i eat only 2-3 "meaty" meals a week, i make it count with high quality ingredients.
                              Few but ripe.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by j3nn View Post
                                It happens when anything becomes a religion. I'm diet agnostic. I think all protocols with specific rules are too rigid yet might have some worthy points. It's just a matter of finding what works for you. Cannot believe how seriously some take things like orange juice and kale. It can't be healthy to get that worked up about macronutrients and quantities of food.
                                I hear you. I enjoy reading Peat, but honestly, I don't live my life trying to "optimise my thyroid" or "raise my metabolism".

                                His ideas are outlandish, and the only reason I implement them is cos'... they work for me! Not cos' of "references" (which can always be debunked, depending on your perspective).

                                Btw, have you ever thought of writing to Peat asking for advice about your digestive issues?


                                Originally posted by 70in2012 View Post
                                What i eat:
                                - a lot of fruits (usually fruits through out the day and cooked food for dinner; roughly 3-4 bananas, a bowl of cherries, half a medium sized water melon, mangos/jackfruit/papaya/guava based on season and dates)
                                - potatoes (i use it as "base" for cooked food, usually dinner; so baked potato + cheese or eggs or meat)
                                - vegetables (from a selection of broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, kale, tomato, eggplant, etc) and nuts
                                - 2 raw carrots a day
                                - about 2 single espressos with sugar
                                - 1 Lindt 70% chocolate bar a day
                                - a pint of Haagen Daz vanilla ice cream over a week
                                - Meat/Fish/Poultry: no more than 2 or 3 meals a weak

                                No grains.

                                Less meat works better on me. While i eat only 2-3 "meaty" meals a week, i make it count with high quality ingredients.
                                That sounds very reasonable I need to start putting more care into my ingredients... I've gotten so lazy, and I know it makes a difference.

                                I'm going to try and sneak liver into my diet by mincing it and mixing with minced beef to form burgers
                                Last edited by YogaBare; 08-06-2013, 11:19 PM.
                                "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                                In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                                - Ray Peat

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X