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Kerrygold Butter No Longer 100% Grass Fed

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  • #16
    Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
    Yes. Not natural/fresh green grass though.

    If a cow only ate hay all year round in a confined lot then saying it grass fed is technically correct too. For me grass fed is pastured on green grass - some hay supplementation may be required at times.




    Yes hay is often used over the winter but some places in less colder climates can have grass.
    What?? There is grass hay and hay made from wheat and oat stalks. Of course livestock is fed grass hay when pasturing isn't possible.

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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    • #17
      Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
      Yes hay is often used over the winter but some places in less colder climates can have grass.
      Not just colder places. Texas is having drought and my uncle was saying they've had to feed their cows a lot of hay lately.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by lea View Post
        Not just colder places. Texas is having drought and my uncle was saying they've had to feed their cows a lot of hay lately.
        Ok maybe places of more moderate climate

        The farmer I buy from rarely has to supplement hay - he has green grass all year round (maybe he doesnt overstock the pastures too)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
          What?? There is grass hay and hay made from wheat and oat stalks. Of course livestock is fed grass hay when pasturing isn't possible.

          Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
          I kinda think as hay being dried grass and straw being dried grain stalks (eg wheat and oat stalks) - though a technicality I guess.

          Since the toxins are said to be in the grain/seed (I guess little is in the stalk itself).

          I think live stock would eat some straw too.

          I guess also wild animals eat naturally dried grass at the end of the season so it may not be a big deal if green grass is the bulk of the food.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
            I kinda think as hay being dried grass and straw being dried grain stalks (eg wheat and oat stalks) - though a technicality I guess.

            Since the toxins are said to be in the grain/seed (I guess little is in the stalk itself).

            I think live stock would eat some straw too.

            I guess also wild animals eat naturally dried grass at the end of the season so it may not be a big deal if green grass is the bulk of the food.
            Goodness. Toxins are a problem? Feed the beef what they want. End of story.

            Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

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            • #21
              We are super blessed to have access to 100% grass-fed (year 'round) butter, raw milk, and cheese from a local small farmer near us. They use alfalfa (as we have done) to have a cow stand while being milked. Alfalfa is a legume. We do know folks that will toss some molasses-coated grain feed (typically called "sweet feed") into a bucket for their milking cows, but not everyone does that. Ask though if you have grain sensitivities.

              Hay can be strictly grass or a mix of grasses (we put up mixed grass hay from our farm and from a neighbor's farm, preferably before seed heads are an issue); ask your local farmer what kind of hay they feed. Alfalfa is great in the winter as it is rich, but it can be expensive to get and feed if you are feeding a lot of it.

              Our practice is to feed a mixed grass hay versus a single ingredient hay--we feel the cows (horses, sheep, hogs) benefit best when the hay is a variety mix. Alfalfa for our critters is a treat in the dried form, but not a staple in their diets.

              Our cows (Highlands), sheep and horses eat vines, low hanging leaves, etc. not just "grasses." We have small meadows in the lower areas of our property that we didn't know could even exist because of our diligent and hungry Highland cattle!

              I didn't want to buy any Kerrygold because they have it at Sam's Club near us; we know what a lot of products have to go through to get onto Wal-Mart-type shelves and it isn't pretty.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
                Goodness. Toxins are a problem? Feed the beef what they want. End of story.

                Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
                Not sure who you are arguing with.

                If it's me then have stated that fresh green grass is best for cattle - not hay, not straw.

                As for the straw-man argument
                "Toxins are a problem?" - Yes they are IMO.

                I have suggested the toxins MAY only be concentrated in the grain and not the stalks (if that is wrong then then I can correct this guess to actual reality) - But even if the toxins are not in the stalks it still doesn't mean it's a better food than fresh green grass.

                I buy from a farmer that has green grass all year round.

                Though I try to be a realist and accept that some places don't have much green grass at some times of the year.
                If supplementing of hay did not occur at times of the year in these places, then there would be no dairy or beef meat produced in these places for much of the year (in fact they would not keep cattle at all as they couldn't feed them all year round).

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                • #23
                  Hay - cut, dried, and baled grass.
                  Alfalfa - cut, dried, and baled alfalfa
                  Straw - cut, dried, and baled wheat and corn stalks

                  Usually, straw is used as bedding. Animals may nibble on some, but most don't. Not only are they usually offered enough of the good stuff, but most animals are a lot cleaner than most people think they are and don't eat what they sleep and/or go to the restroom.

                  Something to be weary of. The grasses are rarely sprayed with pesticides while they grow, but the borders and ditches are, and the fields will sometimes be sprayed between plantings. Also, the seeds are coated with a powdered type of pesticide/poison. I don't know how it affects the plants themselves, but it is there.

                  There is also GM alfalfa now, too. And that is sprayed a lot more liberally (plus, it's GMO, so if your goal is to avoid that...yeah).

                  So, even if it's 100% grassfed, remember that it may still not be "clean" depending on its field and on its alfalfa and hay bales during the time of the year that it can't eat outside.

                  Source: three summers of baling hay and feeding animals.

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                  • #24
                    Even if the cows are fed supplemental grains, I'm sure it's still better than GMO soy used in the animal feed here in the US.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Primal Moose View Post
                      Hay - cut, dried, and baled grass.
                      Alfalfa - cut, dried, and baled alfalfa
                      Straw - cut, dried, and baled wheat and corn stalks

                      Usually, straw is used as bedding. Animals may nibble on some, but most don't. Not only are they usually offered enough of the good stuff, but most animals are a lot cleaner than most people think they are and don't eat what they sleep and/or go to the restroom.

                      Something to be weary of. The grasses are rarely sprayed with pesticides while they grow, but the borders and ditches are, and the fields will sometimes be sprayed between plantings. Also, the seeds are coated with a powdered type of pesticide/poison. I don't know how it affects the plants themselves, but it is there.

                      There is also GM alfalfa now, too. And that is sprayed a lot more liberally (plus, it's GMO, so if your goal is to avoid that...yeah).

                      So, even if it's 100% grassfed, remember that it may still not be "clean" depending on its field and on its alfalfa and hay bales during the time of the year that it can't eat outside.

                      Source: three summers of baling hay and feeding animals.
                      Yes I would think the straw is quite tough for them to eat compared to hay.
                      Cows dont seem to be too interested in straw but come quickly when they see hay being driven to the field
                      The spraying happens along with overspray from neighbouring farms, so itís not perfect.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by EatMoveSleep View Post
                        Ok maybe places of more moderate climate

                        The farmer I buy from rarely has to supplement hay - he has green grass all year round (maybe he doesnt overstock the pastures too)
                        Texas is the climate most resembling the 9th level of HELL right now! Or so we feel at the moment...

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by RenegadeRN View Post
                          Texas is the climate most resembling the 9th level of HELL right now! Or so we feel at the moment...
                          Ok sorry to hear that.

                          So I guess hay is on the menu - so to speak

                          I know a commercial farmer that is in a warmer climate and come to think of it he sometimes has to hay supplement in times of drought - not sure if that means every summer.

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                          • #28
                            Hay is just the grass version of beef jerky. No big deal for cows.

                            Sent via A-10 Warthog

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Mr. Anthony View Post
                              Hay is just the grass version of beef jerky. No big deal for cows.
                              Probably a good analogy.

                              For humans beef jerky is a occasional supplement/snack (normally??), not a proper meal like roast beef and veg.

                              Thanks for reminding me - I have to try get some jerky

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by oceangrl View Post
                                What?? There is grass hay and hay made from wheat and oat stalks. Of course livestock is fed grass hay when pasturing isn't possible.

                                Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2
                                Hay is cut grass. Cut at the best time. Grown tall but the stalls are not dried out. It is mown down and then turned a few times to dry it out. There is huge nutritional value in hay - that's why the cows run after the tractor when you " feed out" in winter. They definitely know their hay from their straw!

                                Straw is the stalks of barley or other grain that had gone past the prime growing stage. Where the stalks are dried up and the grain is at the end of the stalk ready for harvest. Cattle won't eat this rubbish and neither will horses. There us no nutritional value in it.

                                It's perfectly fine to eat butter or milk from hay or silage feed animals.

                                Proper grassfed butter is a nice deep yellow colour. As new zealanders we know the butter is always a deeper yellow colour in springtime when the spring Clover grows. Same with cheese. What on earth do American cheese makers put in the chedder to make it orange? Chedder is yellow too! That always gets me wound up when I see orange cheese. ..

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