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Need help regarding Rice

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  • #16
    A rice cooker makes it easier, and I've had good luck with very inexpensive ones. My old Black & Decker (yard sale item for a dollar) basically steamed the rice, so it never could burn, but had more pieces, so was more of a hassle to clean. My Rival cooker (I think about $15) isn't fool proof, especially since I usually only cook 1/4 cup dry measure at a time. But it's easier to clean. Rice is pretty simple - water + salt + dry rice + heat = cooked rice.

    I agree with loafingcactus that old rice tastes icky.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #17
      Okay thanks.

      What type of rice as there seems to be loads of white rice?
      Short / medium / long GRAIN
      basmati / Thai / sushi & any others ...

      Being from the UK what quality brands do we have or just go for anything organic etc ..


      From London England UK

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Ryancarter1986 View Post
        What type of rice as there seems to be loads of white rice?
        Short / medium / long GRAIN
        basmati / Thai / sushi & any others ...
        I'm a Londoner too, when it's cooked I have a hard time telling the difference between basmati and regular white long grain, the only ones to avoid if it's accompanying a meal are the risotto rices, and pudding rice, they swell up more to absorb stuff, although that said I'm going by the end products and I've never used them.

        I just buy regular white long-grain rice, make sure you don't overcook it because it goes gluey and the individual grains turn into mush, I tend to buy any supermarket's organic white long-grain (organic mainly to reduce the impact of pesticides where it's grown) and it's fine.

        I use it maybe once or twice a month, 20g - 30g at a time, but I'm only active with a bit of walking and Pilates and I'd probably use more if I felt I had higher energy needs.

        It's mainly in my life because potatoes shivel up in the veg drawer long before I ever get round to using them, I can't be bothered with most sweet potatoes except the orange-fleshed round ones, and at least rice keeps.

        HTH!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Ryancarter1986 View Post
          Okay thanks.

          What type of rice as there seems to be loads of white rice?
          Short / medium / long GRAIN
          basmati / Thai / sushi & any others ...

          Being from the UK what quality brands do we have or just go for anything organic etc ..


          From London England UK
          This article explains all the varieties

          http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/reci...od-guides/rice

          From London England UK
          Last edited by Ryancarter1986; 08-03-2013, 10:12 AM.

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          • #20
            I tried some basmati a while ago and it looked like ordinary long-grain white to me... I'm nobody's idea of a gourmet though!

            I think it's less starchy in terms of how it cooks, less chance of the grains being slightly stuck together? That's about it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Lady D View Post
              I tried some basmati a while ago and it looked like ordinary long-grain white to me... I'm nobody's idea of a gourmet though!

              I think it's less starchy in terms of how it cooks, less chance of the grains being slightly stuck together? That's about it.
              You can rinse the rice until the water is clear to get rid of the extra starch. I'm Asian so this is how my family has always prepared it. I don't own a rice cooker either. Certain rice requires more water than others. Typically long grain white rice is 1 to 1 ratio. A lot of people find it tricky to cook rice especially if it's not something they grew up eating. Cover the pot and let it boil then just simmer it until the water is gone. Do not stir it.

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              • #22
                When I do have white rice, I like to rinse it and then let it soak for a little while. Makes it nice and sticky.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by WeldingHank View Post
                  Wild rice for me! Native americans thrived on it, along with corn. Good enough for me.
                  I adore wild rice and actually have access to truly wild, hand harvested rice that is free and amazing! But my guts just hate it! It's so annoying!!
                  Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                  http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jammies View Post
                    I adore wild rice and actually have access to truly wild, hand harvested rice that is free and amazing! But my guts just hate it! It's so annoying!!
                    One of my favorite meals has become 1lb of grilled salmon with a mountain of wild rice after a 2 hour Krav session. Embracing my Native roots! LOL.

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                    • #25
                      Rice is so versatile. I cook it in bone broth and salt because my daughter loves rice. Leftover rice is great for fried rice.. which you can add whatever you feel like to make a meal. Usually we add eggs or curd or seaweed or leftover meats/veggies + spices like turmeric, coriander, etc.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by cayla29s View Post
                        You can rinse the rice until the water is clear to get rid of the extra starch. I'm Asian so this is how my family has always prepared it. I don't own a rice cooker either. Certain rice requires more water than others. Typically long grain white rice is 1 to 1 ratio. A lot of people find it tricky to cook rice especially if it's not something they grew up eating. Cover the pot and let it boil then just simmer it until the water is gone. Do not stir it.

                        I have found that long grain rice (basmati) requires almost 2:1 water to to rice ratio and short-grain rice (jasmine) is 1:1 or 1.25:1. I saw on the sack of rice that I bought that the quantity of water needed varies according to the month.

                        Thanks for the tip on rinsing the rice to get rid of starch!

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                        • #27
                          I think I'm making some sticky rice tomorrow now.
                          Out of context quote for the day:

                          Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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                          • #28
                            please read/skim this article for your health

                            https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/...food/index.htm

                            organic supposedly does NOT help to reduce arsenic levels

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                            • #29
                              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...p?t=89371AVOID Thai rice
                              SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
                              “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

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                              • #30
                                Rice is a good source of carbs it is comparable to bread and combines well with any viand.

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