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  • Salt? Really?

    Personally I don't like salt too much, though as far as I've read from the blog it seems that eating two tablespoons of salt might actually be healthier than eating none. Do you agree with that? And if you do, what foods have actually better taste when salted? Meat, veggies, fruit? I've never seen salt as taste-improving.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Well I love (good) salt. So I would say practically anything. But the big oneis a green salad, which without the right amount of salt and the perefect dressing, is just all wrong, but with them is perfect.

    And if you don't season your steaks and roast meatS then you're missing all the crispy, salty umami goodness that is the edges of perfectly cooked meats. Yum.

    But I speak as someone who adds salts to (homemade) ice-cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      My mother was from Kentucky and would salt watermelon, which is something quite frequently done in the South. I never was a fan of it, myself. A small pinch of salt in sweets helps to bring out the flavor of the sweet. It sounds counterintuitive, I know. A little bit of salt truly does help to bring out the natural flavor of the food. It also helps dehydrate veggies. If you're making something like an egg plant or zucchini lasagna (using egg plant or zucchini as the "noodle") it helps to salt the veggies first and let them sit for 30 to 45 minutes, then rinse them and then put them in the casserole. I've heard of career sailors putting a pinch of salt in their coffee.

      Your body does need some salt. Sodium levels are one of the standard lab values that doctors look at when patients get blood work done. If you have low levels it can cause problems just as high levels can. Americans as a general rule probably eat too much because processed food is riddled with the stuff. Primal eaters probably have to work a little bit harder to get salt because we tend to not eat processed food.

      If you haven't already, do a taste test with something cooked without salt and something cooked with just a little bit of salt. Use a good sea salt and not the regular "table" salt that you can find. A good sea salt actually has less sodium and is less "salty" tasting, if that makes sense.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm not a big salt fan either. If something tastes salty, to me, it has too much salt.

        However, salt is good for some things. For example, when you cook veggies or meat, especially in a pan, a little salt helps to sweat the veggies and get some of the fluid out of the meat. This concentrates the flavor of the food.

        Unless you're only buying butter for coffee, go ahead and buy the lightly salted for cooking.

        If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
        "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

        B*tch-lite

        Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by JoanieL View Post


          If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
          i buy plain canned san marzano tomatoes, nothing added and eat cured meats only once in a blue moon. grass-fed hard cheese just once or twice per week


          eggs, tomatoes and potatoes are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better with good salt.


          there is a reason salt was once used as currency -- we would die without sufficient sodium intake.

          if you're flirting with ketosis, sodium intake is especially helpful in balancing electrolytes too.

          As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

          – Ernest Hemingway

          Comment


          • #6
            Romans paid soldiers in salt. (a man worth his salt!) 'Nuff said.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by WeldingHank View Post
              Romans paid soldiers in salt. (a man worth his salt!) 'Nuff said.
              yup. the latin word for salt is sal. that is the root for salary.
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              – Ernest Hemingway

              Comment


              • #8
                When I was in Spain, I found the food extraordinarily salty.

                I think that there is a range of safe, healthy salt intake. A person can adapt to a lower level, and your taste buds can get used to it and prefer it. Lots of people have forced themselves to eat no salt, thinking it was healthier, and survive, now lecturing others about the virtues of a no salt added diet. But there is still the possibility that under stress conditions like heat and temporary dietary changes someone might need more salt.

                Comment


                • #9
                  We need salt, or else suffer serious health problems.

                  Shaking up the Salt Myth: The Human Need for Salt
                  A Post-Primal PrimalPat

                  Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There is not a culture on earth, ancient or modern, that does not consume at least 10 times the amount of salt that is currently recommended by doctors. Clearly we do not understand the role of salt in the body very well if by nature we will consume as much of it as we can.
                    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think one problem with saying that salt does not increase blood pressure in other countries is that it just doesn't matter since it does in the USA. Even in people from other countries. One thought is that it has something to do with lifestyle stress, since a particularly confounding difference is found between Africans and similarly situation African Americans.

                      If you eat unprocessed foods and don't have even borderline hypertension, I wouldn't worry about adding as much salt as you like. I have hypotension and have to make an effort to add salt. But if you have hypertension, hypertension in the USA is particularly deadly for some reason...and I wouldn't let some rainforest study dissuade you from being concerned about that.

                      I realize the OP is from Spain, I have no idea how Spain compares to the USA in the relationship between salt, hypertension and death, but I would assume as a western country it is somewhat similar.
                      “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
                      Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Is Salt Healthy? | Marks Daily Apple

                        "Recent evidence suggests that for many people, all out salt reduction has an overall negative impact on several other aspects of health..."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There is also a connection between low salt intake and insulin resistance, that is really fascinating, to me at least.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by freerangepiglings View Post
                            Well I love (good) salt. So I would say practically anything. But the big oneis a green salad, which without the right amount of salt and the perefect dressing, is just all wrong, but with them is perfect.

                            And if you don't season your steaks and roast meatS then you're missing all the crispy, salty umami goodness that is the edges of perfectly cooked meats. Yum.

                            But I speak as someone who adds salts to (homemade) ice-cream.
                            Mmm... OK, I'll try to add a little salt to my meat salads

                            Originally posted by RobinNM View Post
                            My mother was from Kentucky and would salt watermelon, which is something quite frequently done in the South. I never was a fan of it, myself. A small pinch of salt in sweets helps to bring out the flavor of the sweet. It sounds counterintuitive, I know. A little bit of salt truly does help to bring out the natural flavor of the food. It also helps dehydrate veggies. If you're making something like an egg plant or zucchini lasagna (using egg plant or zucchini as the "noodle") it helps to salt the veggies first and let them sit for 30 to 45 minutes, then rinse them and then put them in the casserole. I've heard of career sailors putting a pinch of salt in their coffee.

                            Your body does need some salt. Sodium levels are one of the standard lab values that doctors look at when patients get blood work done. If you have low levels it can cause problems just as high levels can. Americans as a general rule probably eat too much because processed food is riddled with the stuff. Primal eaters probably have to work a little bit harder to get salt because we tend to not eat processed food.

                            If you haven't already, do a taste test with something cooked without salt and something cooked with just a little bit of salt. Use a good sea salt and not the regular "table" salt that you can find. A good sea salt actually has less sodium and is less "salty" tasting, if that makes sense.
                            OK, I'll try to add salt to everything, I hope I don't have to regret it!

                            But what's the difference between sea salt and table salt?

                            Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                            I'm not a big salt fan either. If something tastes salty, to me, it has too much salt.

                            However, salt is good for some things. For example, when you cook veggies or meat, especially in a pan, a little salt helps to sweat the veggies and get some of the fluid out of the meat. This concentrates the flavor of the food.

                            Unless you're only buying butter for coffee, go ahead and buy the lightly salted for cooking.

                            If you're eating any cured meats or aged cheeses, you're probably getting some sodium there. Olives also have a fairly good sodium content. As does jarred/canned tomato sauce or tomato paste. If you feel good and your weight, bp, etc., are good, I wouldn't worry about turning yourself into a salt freak. It's true that when we stop eating processed foods, we can stop being afraid of the salt shaker, but there's no need to force it.
                            So, salt for meat, OK. Note that I don't eat anything canned but sardines nor cured meats or dairy, but thanks

                            Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                            i buy plain canned san marzano tomatoes, nothing added and eat cured meats only once in a blue moon. grass-fed hard cheese just once or twice per week


                            eggs, tomatoes and potatoes are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay better with good salt.


                            there is a reason salt was once used as currency -- we would die without sufficient sodium intake.

                            if you're flirting with ketosis, sodium intake is especially helpful in balancing electrolytes too.

                            Got the idea, thanks

                            Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                            When I was in Spain, I found the food extraordinarily salty.

                            I think that there is a range of safe, healthy salt intake. A person can adapt to a lower level, and your taste buds can get used to it and prefer it. Lots of people have forced themselves to eat no salt, thinking it was healthier, and survive, now lecturing others about the virtues of a no salt added diet. But there is still the possibility that under stress conditions like heat and temporary dietary changes someone might need more salt.
                            Really? I though it was only me who didn't like salt at all!

                            Originally posted by patski View Post
                            We need salt, or else suffer serious health problems.

                            Shaking up the Salt Myth: The Human Need for Salt
                            I'll read the link, thanks

                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            There is not a culture on earth, ancient or modern, that does not consume at least 10 times the amount of salt that is currently recommended by doctors. Clearly we do not understand the role of salt in the body very well if by nature we will consume as much of it as we can.
                            Got it

                            Originally posted by loafingcactus View Post
                            I think one problem with saying that salt does not increase blood pressure in other countries is that it just doesn't matter since it does in the USA. Even in people from other countries. One thought is that it has something to do with lifestyle stress, since a particularly confounding difference is found between Africans and similarly situation African Americans.

                            If you eat unprocessed foods and don't have even borderline hypertension, I wouldn't worry about adding as much salt as you like. I have hypotension and have to make an effort to add salt. But if you have hypertension, hypertension in the USA is particularly deadly for some reason...and I wouldn't let some rainforest study dissuade you from being concerned about that.

                            I realize the OP is from Spain, I have no idea how Spain compares to the USA in the relationship between salt, hypertension and death, but I would assume as a western country it is somewhat similar.
                            Yes, somewhat, we're healthier here (as far as they say). The "spanish paradox" and all that. I'm reading "good calories, bad calories" and apparently salt is not correlated with hypertension as much as they say, that's why I'm asking this

                            Originally posted by Goldie View Post
                            Is Salt Healthy? | Marks Daily Apple

                            "Recent evidence suggests that for many people, all out salt reduction has an overall negative impact on several other aspects of health..."
                            (Same as in the book) Thanks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Salt added at the cooking stage makes just about everything better, even sweets.

                              Comment

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