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  • Dairy == inflammation?

    For the most part I stopped eating dairy when I started eating PB-style. One of the reasons I decided to try PB was to improve my digestion. I didn't know whether it was cutting out the grains, the dairy, or what, but my digestion improved substantially almost right away.

    Then I reintroduced dairy (a cup or two of raw whole milk a day, some organic yogurt, and occasional cheese), and noticed no ill effects on my digestion. Gradually over the last month or so I've begun to eat a lot more dairy. When I started strength-training in earnest, I began to drink substantially more milk (24-32oz day on average) and also eat a lot of cottage cheese. Buying raw milk is a lot less convenient than buying organic milk from the supermarket, so I started drinking that. Yes, I know...it's pasteurized and homogenized.

    I've noticed lately that my previous signs of inflammation are returning: sore finger joints in the morning, sore knee joints, and sore ribs (sometimes acutely sore, to the point that I think my ribs are "slipping") when I sleep on my side.

    I'm hesitant to blame dairy solely, because there very well could be other things causing these symptoms. For example, I've also been eating more dark chocolate than I had before (averaging 1 to 1.5 servings per day after meals), and I've been more consistent with my strength training. However, I do suspect that dairy may be playing a role here. Am I right to suspect this? Have you noticed a connection between increased dairy consumption and increased inflammation?

    Increasing my protein intake from milk and (especially) cottage cheese is just too darn convenient when strength training, so I hope I don't have to eliminate dairy completely.

  • #2
    I'm not a fan of most dairy and especially pasteurized milk. I have heard figures like 75% of people come to great auto-immune harm by drinking pasteurized milk, and it's not always so evident like with digestive problems of bodily inflammation, it can be subtle but deadly. Lots of people can't handle lactose or casein and there's some evidence to show that raw milk with the bacterial culture mitigates this kind of stuff, but why would you risk it? I think that anyone who wants to eat dairy of any kind should go get a real food sensitivity test from a competent naturopath and discover the truth. Auto-immune destruction of your GI tract ain't primal.

    This was an interesting article. I don't know how much weight it carries but just going by our evolutionary axiom, I'd say that milk protein is bad news. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15578035

    How about whey isolate at least. I know it's not dirt-cheap like pasteurized milk but there's a reason for pasteurized milk's dirt-cheapness.
    Last edited by Stabby; 04-30-2010, 10:17 AM.
    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

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    • #3
      Completely off topic, I couldn't help noticing the double = in the title. Are you a fan of the Java language?

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      • #4
        That much milk and cottage cheese would definitely reactivate a lactose or casein intolerance - probably best to go dairy free to repair the gut, and then only add back sparing amount of high fat dairy at first, such as butter, heavy cream, or hard cheese. I have a casein intolerance diagnosed with an IgG test (the science behind that is a little questionable, but as soon as I stopped milk, I lost 5 pounds immediately, and my lifelong cramps when I run have never come back, so something was going on there!). Anyway, the high fat dairy was advised in sparing amounts after a three month rest for the gut. I've only finished one month, so I can't tell you how it will go reintroducing those, though my sister, who probably has the same issue, was successful with that.

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        • #5
          Completely off topic, I couldn't help noticing the double = in the title. Are you a fan of the Java language?
          or C#/C++? :*
          ad astra per aspera

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          • #6
            Much to my chagrin, I think cow dairy might be the cause of my inflammation. I'm starting an n=1 experiment in May to check it out (no cow except grass-fed butter).

            Now if I could only figure out what to put in my coffee (coconut oil and milk are out; tried that)??
            Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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            • #7
              Have you ever tried just goat's or sheep's milk products instead of cow's milk? They have another form of casein that is less problematic.
              Even different breeds of cows produce 2 kinds of casein proteins with different effects on our body, so that might be part of the issue, too: http://naturalbias.com/a1-beta-casei...-in-your-milk/
              http://www.prettyinprimal.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                Don't know about others, but I'll be keeping goat milk in the mix. I am unsure of it in coffee, though, as I've become a raving fan of heavy cream. I will be giving it a whirl.
                Started PB late 2008, lost 50 lbs by late 2009. Have been plateaued, but that thing may just be biting the dust: more on that later.

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                • #9
                  all my dairy, save the shot of cream/butter is goat. still, i use it sparingly. strained yogurt maybe twice a week, cheese rarely, and kefir a couple times a week
                  Get on my Level
                  http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TheFastCat View Post
                    Originally posted by maba
                    Completely off topic, I couldn't help noticing the double = in the title. Are you a fan of the Java language?
                    or C#/C++? :*
                    Or C, Perl, Python, Ruby...etc. '==' for equality has been around at least as long as C I believe.

                    Anyway, I've done some work with Java, but it's been a few years since I last used it for anything significant. It's probably come a long way since then. I wasn't a huge fan at the time (Java 1.5).

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                    • #11
                      I found out recently that, at least in my case, Dairy does tend cause inflammation. I have narrowed the possible culprits down to heavy cream, some young cheeses and parmigiano. All natural whole dairy, mind you, except maybe for the heavy cream. This sucks becasue I really love cheese.
                      “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                      "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                      "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the replies everyone. I guess the obvious way to see whether dairy is the main contributing factor to my sore joints is to cut it out of my diet for a while and see what happens. Then reintroduce it and see what happens. This isn't fool proof, but it could be enough to convince me that dairy is (or is not) contributing to my symptoms of inflammation.

                        Stabby, I don't know much about naturopathy, but I'll look into that as well.

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                        • #13
                          I have been toying with this topic. i guess I have a decent attatchment to certain dairy products. The opiate effect can be a strong lure. However I do believe I can tolerate certain things but the question is what's happening internally while perhaps symptom free. It also appears to "add up" for me. If everyone blue moon I wanted to have a coffee with copious amounts of cream I could enjoy it and get away with it but multiple uses in a row coupled with other dairy is a sure perscription for inflammation. I get skin breakouts, water retention, and the cleaner my diet; gastric upset. The more I have these experiences the more I realize it's so not worth it. I definitely do not get the same reaction with goat product but I feel the need to omit things altogether for awhile. I don't really like butter (weird I know, coconut oil fills my soul with delight), heavy cream is the kicker. In the future I can always enjoy a goat cheese rather than cow's, they're delicious as well. And cream will be my treat if I want it bad enough. If you want motivation to kick a yummy habit read The China Study. LOL

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                          • #14
                            i feel the same way AM roots, i still pt cream in my coffe an use buter but dairy anywhereese in my diet the same day is prescription for achy joints(ONLY 24 YRS OLD HERE!) ad breakouts, bloat
                            Get on my Level
                            http://malpaz.wordpress.com/

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                            • #15
                              27 yrs. old

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