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Results of 1/2 Year Strict Experiment

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  • #31
    Ha ha the little tiny pieces on their plates. For all I know, they've still got meat in their pants. But I wouldn't know.
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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    • #32
      I thoroughly enjoyed this thread and your updates, Kimchi. I know that brain fog all too well and am making a serious effort to eat cleaner and simpler this year. Your concrete results really make it hit home that this way of eating is the right one for me.
      5'4/125

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      • #33
        Originally posted by TheyCallMeLazarus View Post
        I almost never see a non-diabetic, so often we are dealing with VERY sick people. I have to give the "there is no maybe. It's change or die." speech a few times a week.
        I find these speeches don't' always work for people. It's so frustrating/heart breaking.

        In our last conversation, you spoke of this work; I see now, with the context of being a physician, that people are asking you things and you are making very educated assessments of what their situation is. In my case, I just teach a yoga class -- and I cannot make any more assessment than what I see in their bodies in terms of the movement modality. That's a *wide gap*.

        Apollogies if any were/are needed, and otherwise, keep doing the good work.

        All you need to know about your blood panel, it's ONLY worth when concerning LP's, trigly, or blood glucose is to answer one question: Do you have metabolic syndrome, and how advanced is it?

        That's all. The rest is window dressing and cool to track, but I don't count it otherwise....in my case, I am dealing with SEVERE metabolic syndrome, and that is what kills you. Blood sugar, high LDL, low HDL, obesity, that isn't what kills you. Metabolic syndrome kills you, surefire as they come.
        I wish more doctors paid attention to this. Or, maybe people aren't listening to their doctors.

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        • #34
          I think doctors don't even notice until it gets to a severe stage. I mean, I figured I've been in the pre-metabolic syndrome stage for most of my adult life. The only warning I've gotten is "hmm, your triglycerides and total cholesterol are a little high, you should avoid red meat and eat low fat. Your ratios is okay so we'll just keep an eye out for when that changes and start you on meds at that time." Perhaps things could have been stopped in their tracks without the red meat/low fat speech and instead a diet and exercise plan like Lazarus suggested, perhaps without all the scary "you're gonna die" stuff, since I clearly wasn't on death's door. I normally only ever go to the doctor to ask for travel meds for my wild adventures or to have him freeze off pre-cancerous lesions.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #35
            Kimchi I'm impressed that you're living in Korea and managing to not eat rice. Do you actually eat Kimchi? If so what do you eat it with? My best friend growing up was half Korean, her mom made delicious kimchi and we ate it with a lot of rice.
            Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
              I think doctors don't even notice until it gets to a severe stage. I mean, I figured I've been in the pre-metabolic syndrome stage for most of my adult life. The only warning I've gotten is "hmm, your triglycerides and total cholesterol are a little high, you should avoid red meat and eat low fat. Your ratios is okay so we'll just keep an eye out for when that changes and start you on meds at that time." Perhaps things could have been stopped in their tracks without the red meat/low fat speech and instead a diet and exercise plan like Lazarus suggested, perhaps without all the scary "you're gonna die" stuff, since I clearly wasn't on death's door. I normally only ever go to the doctor to ask for travel meds for my wild adventures or to have him freeze off pre-cancerous lesions.
              You might have something there. It's not so much that they are cold hearted or ignorant or what have you, but that they may be seeing severe cases, and you don't seem like a big deal really, and so on.

              I know that, for myself, I pretty much only go to doctors for physicals. We don't get sick often, so there's no real need, and when we do get sick, I start with the "rest, fluids, good nutrition" path first, and if things don't improve when/how I want them to, then we go to the doctor.

              My last doctor was amazing. I absolutely loved him. He would usually look to lifestyle first, then herbalism, and then go allopathy. He was very awesome. He basically felt like we should only come in for physicals, and even then, only when we wanted to. We are very healthy.

              So, we go every-other year. We went in 2012 -- blood work came back awesome. DS didn't have blood work, of course, but he's extremely healthy. He's getting a physical for the new school on Monday, and I'm sure that'll come back fine. We'll probably go in November of this year, assuming we find a doctor that we like. Otherwise, we'll skip it until we do.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                Kimchi I'm impressed that you're living in Korea and managing to not eat rice. Do you actually eat Kimchi? If so what do you eat it with?
                Amazing right? I actually ate zero rice in 2013, not a single grain.

                My ignorant theory when arriving in Asia two years ago was similar to what many Westerners think "Asians are thin cause they eat a lot of rice, grains are healthy". However after a year of increased rice consumption (and lots of "heathy" whole grain rice) my body fat, blood sugar and triglycerides increased. The Korean doctor told me "heading into metabolic syndrome territory, you might have it in 10 years, so eat less meat (meaning more carbs), more fiber, and do cardio". Seriously, these doctors are pushing people who trust them down the metabolic syndrome path, they are directly responsible for the epidemic, in part.

                However talking with other expats I found a lot of people saying the same thing "don't think you can eat the rice like the locals do, you'll fatten up quick". That's when I faced the fact that my understanding of nutrition was wrong, and the doctors were wrong, and decided to do more research, and encountered paleo!! A year later my health is fantastically better, and the doctor told me a week ago "but now your LDL is high, eat a low-fat diet with daily cardio". No joke.

                Kimchi! There's many different varieties, I eat it a few times a week. It's usually served as a small side dish with almost every meal here, the locals swear it is a miracle food, especially for obesity. They have a high rate of stomach cancer here though so I don't do it every day. Coating all their food in spice instead of sugar is my guess why their obesity / MetS rates are so much lower (lowest obesity in the developed world). But too much spice might not be so great...

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