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  • Greek Yogurt Question

    First post!

    I'm a frequent forum reader but never created a profile, until now. I've had a burning question for a while now and I couldn't find it addressed anywhere on the forum or website so I figured it was time!

    I know that full-fat greek yogurt is the way to go, but if you don't have access to grass-fed greek yogurt is Fage/Chobani/etc still a healthy option? I've seen threads where people recommend Fage, Chobani, etc, but wouldn't these be products from grain-fed cows? I know Mark's whole reason for advocating grass-fed beef as opposed to traditional grain-fed is the superior fatty-acid profile, so shouldn't full-fat greek yogurt be held to the same standard? If its been discussed elsewhere and I missed it, I apologize! Just something that I've been curious about for a while. Thanks!

  • #2
    They feed beef cattle grain to fatten them up for slaughter. They are keeping the dairy cattle for years. Grain wouldn't be healthy for them. Every dairy farmer I know grows as much hay as possible for his cows.

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    • #3
      Well I don't have the monies for everything grass-fed and free as William Wallace, but I have found that finding a Fage or Chobani Greek yogurt that isn't non/low-fat to be very difficult.

      This is the stuff I get as it seems to be full fat. You'll just have to read your labels closely.

      I'm sure someone will chime in on how to make your own from regular yogurt as I've heard it's quite easy, so if you have access to good ol' grass-fed regular yogurt, you could try that. I think it just comes down to straining it overnight.
      "The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love and something to hope for." - Allan K. Chalmers (1759-1834)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
        They feed beef cattle grain to fatten them up for slaughter. They are keeping the dairy cattle for years. Grain wouldn't be healthy for them. Every dairy farmer I know grows as much hay as possible for his cows.
        That's a good point. Never considered that.
        "The grand essentials of happiness are: something to do, something to love and something to hope for." - Allan K. Chalmers (1759-1834)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Britt View Post
          Well I don't have the monies for everything grass-fed and free as William Wallace, but I have found that finding a Fage or Chobani Greek yogurt that isn't non/low-fat to be very difficult.

          This is the stuff I get as it seems to be full fat. You'll just have to read your labels closely.

          I'm sure someone will chime in on how to make your own from regular yogurt as I've heard it's quite easy, so if you have access to good ol' grass-fed regular yogurt, you could try that. I think it just comes down to straining it overnight.
          I like the taste of Greek Gods Yogurt, but note that it is not real Greek Yogurt. Greek Gods is just regular yogurt with pectin or some other thickener added. Real Greek Yogurt is strained to achieve its thickness, and that leads to a higher protein concentration. I'd say all you have to do is check how many grams of protein to figure out whether a product is "real" or not, but some brands use milk protein solids to achieve a higher looking protein profile so you really have to check the protein and the ingredients list. If it has "true Greek" protein numbers and the only ingredients are milk, cream, and cultures than you know it is the real deal.

          BTW- if you like Greek Gods, try Noosa. Like Greek Gods, it is a "faux Greek" style (Noosa refers to themselves as Australian Style though I don't know if that actually means anything) but with higher quality ingredients and a better creamy consistency.
          My Recipes are at: www.southbeachprimal.com

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          • #6
            To make greek yogurt from regular yogurt, place a colander inside of a bowl. Line the colander with a piece of cotton fabric (an old pillowcase with the side seam removed works well). Dump store bought or homemade yogurt into the fabric. Fold the fabric ends over the yogurt to keep refrigerator smells out and put the whole thing in the fridge for a few hours, until desired consistency is reached. The whey that collects in the bottom bowl can either be used to ferment vegetables (cabbage = sauerkraut) or discarded.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by parakeet View Post
              The whey that collects in the bottom bowl can either be used to ferment vegetables (cabbage = sauerkraut) or discarded.
              Or you can feed it to your animals.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                Or you can feed it to your animals.
                That too Forgot about that one. Thanks, eKatherine

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                • #9
                  One reason that full fat foods are recommended is that many lower fat foods end up with additives and more carbs to plump them up to make them taste like the full fat ones they replaced. Fage 0 doesn't do that. I'm not sure about Chobani, but my brain is telling me it's okay also. The best way to check is to go to each website and look at the nutritional info for the full fat vs the lower fat. If the lower fat/zero fat isn't substantially higher in carbs, the worse they've done is to replace whole milk with lower fat and nonfat milk.

                  Nonfat isn't inherently bad. Processed foods that are nonfat are often Franken foods with a lot of chemicals, so they are bad. But hey, water is nonfat and it's primal.
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                    Nonfat isn't inherently bad. Processed foods that are nonfat are often Franken foods with a lot of chemicals, so they are bad. But hey, water is nonfat and it's primal.
                    Agreed. If I'm using yogurt as the main protein in a light meal I'll do Siggi's or Fage nonfat mostly because they're easy to find.

                    If I'm using yogurt to make veggie dip or a dessert I'll pick a pastured whole-milk one like Dreaming Cow or local sheep/goat stuff.
                    37//6'3"/185

                    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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                    • #11
                      I have a hard time finding full fat Greek yogurt too. Even the places that carry it are often out. I really love the flavor of Fage 2% (don't care for the texture of the 0%), so I just buy that most of the time. If I having it with berries, I often add a little sour cream. That combination I think actually tastes better than full fat yogurt.
                      50yo, 5'3"
                      SW-195
                      CW-125, part calorie counting, part transition to primal
                      GW- Goals are no longer weight-related

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                      • #12
                        I keep thinking I am going to culture my own yogurt. It is possible to buy cultures that produce yogurt that isn't as sour as commercial yogurt.

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                        • #13
                          If all else fails, Trader Joe's always carries their own brand of full fat greek yogurt. 18 g of fat per serving.

                          I'm of course assuming that you have a Trader Joe's where you live.
                          "It's true, you are a good woman. Then again, you may be the antichrist."

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by parakeet View Post
                            To make greek yogurt from regular yogurt, place a colander inside of a bowl. Line the colander with a piece of cotton fabric (an old pillowcase with the side seam removed works well). Dump store bought or homemade yogurt into the fabric. Fold the fabric ends over the yogurt to keep refrigerator smells out and put the whole thing in the fridge for a few hours, until desired consistency is reached. The whey that collects in the bottom bowl can either be used to ferment vegetables (cabbage = sauerkraut) or discarded.
                            Thanks a ton, I think this is what I will do when I can only find regular full fat.

                            eKatherine, I think the tartness is a factor of duration at fermenting heat.

                            Around here, the only full fat I've been able to find is the single serving Fage and Dannon's Greek Yogurt.

                            I've not tried the 2% stuff or 10% stuff I've seen around, but I have tried the nonfat. Both regular and greek have a chalky kind of taste to them when the fat's removed.

                            M.

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                            • #15
                              I like this yogurt starter GI ProHealth - GI ProStart and customprobiotics.com yogurt starter. I usually ferment the yogurt for 12-15 hrs using yogourmet yogurt maker and the yogurt come out perfect. The longer you ferment the tarter it gets.

                              Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                              I keep thinking I am going to culture my own yogurt. It is possible to buy cultures that produce yogurt that isn't as sour as commercial yogurt.

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