Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ketosis

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    You can be in ketosis as long as you want, as long as you feel fine and aren't suffering from any side effects. Some people say never, some people say all the time, some people say a couple weeks. Gotta figure out what works for you.

    I went into Ketosis when I first started eating Primal because I eliminated so many of my carb sources. I wasn't trying to lose weight, but it was just easy to cut everything out.

    The best part: Ketosis euphoria. Felt like my brain was high for a week straight. Then it disappeared, and as my body was craving more carbs, I started to eat more of them.

    Now I eat around 50-150 per day and feel great.
    Primal since September, 2011
    LeanGains IF
    -----
    Conquer your own world and become the leader of your own life
    Inner Gladiator

    How To Never Get Sick (And Add 72,000 Hours To Your Life)

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
      The read his articles here and here.
      Good stuff there. Also, Lyle McDonald has an excellent Q&A about Ketosis and Athletic Performance (specifically addressing cyclical ketogenic diets (CKD)). I think a CKD would be more effective for athletic performance due to some of the points Lyle McDonald makes about being able to refill muscle glycogen without being kicked out of ketosis.
      My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

      Comment


      • #18
        I might also mention that Stephen D. Phinney, M.D., PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, authors of "The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance" work with and have studied world class athletes who remain in a state of ketosis indefinitely and experience performance enhancement.
        Starting Weight: 197.5
        Current Weight: 123
        Far healthier!

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
          Thanks, that's a great talk.
          "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

          Comment


          • #20
            Wow, forgot to link it: Cyclical Ketogenic Diets and Endurance Performance | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald
            My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by janie View Post
              I might also mention that Stephen D. Phinney, M.D., PhD and Jeff Volek, PhD, RD, authors of "The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance" work with and have studied world class athletes who remain in a state of ketosis indefinitely and experience performance enhancement.
              Competing without carbs or training low carbs is a very different beast. Whom are those "world class athletes" and what sport are they competing in?
              "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

              - Schopenhauer

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                Competing without carbs or training low carbs is a very different beast. Whom are those "world class athletes" and what sport are they competing in?
                I believe that they work primarily with keto-adapted endurance athletes, especially cyclists. Their book also has a section with observations from high-performance coaches, sports nutritionists, university athletic coaches, etc. re: their positive use of keto-adaption in various sports. I'm sure you could find more online. BTW, these 2 researchers were also co-authors of the latest Atkins book and their research has focused on keto-adaption and its health benefits.
                Starting Weight: 197.5
                Current Weight: 123
                Far healthier!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Are you an M.D., Gorbag?
                  Starting Weight: 197.5
                  Current Weight: 123
                  Far healthier!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by janie View Post
                    I believe that they work primarily with keto-adapted endurance athletes, especially cyclists. Their book also has a section with observations from high-performance coaches, sports nutritionists, university athletic coaches, etc. re: their positive use of keto-adaption in various sports. I'm sure you could find more online. BTW, these 2 researchers were also co-authors of the latest Atkins book and their research has focused on keto-adaption and its health benefits.
                    I can definitely see a value of getting adapted to performing in ketosis, and that it can give you an edge in endurance sports, since those events often ending up in lack of enough carbs anyway. But I don't think that any serious endurance athlete will compete without first filling up on hundreds of hundreds of grams of carbs the days before an important event and also get plenty of "refill" of fast acting carbs under the competition. Endurance athletes super-compensate carbs to max out their glycogen levels for a good reason, to avoid "the bonk!" - which is a very serious threat to every competing endurance athlete...

                    And no, I am not a MD either, why?
                    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                    - Schopenhauer

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Apparently that is not the experience of the athletes they have studied. And the conclusion of these researchers is that while a high carb diet may arguably be best for short burst high intensity exercise, they see equal or better performance by ultra-endurance athletes at various levels of carb restriction.

                      I asked about the MD b/c I've wondered about your background. You always speak so authoritatively as though the "answer" is carved in stone. I'm not sure it is; perhaps it is evolving and there may be some value in new research and what these authors call a "tectonic shift in sports nutrition thinking".
                      Starting Weight: 197.5
                      Current Weight: 123
                      Far healthier!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by janie View Post
                        Apparently that is not the experience of the athletes they have studied. And the conclusion of these researchers is that while a high carb diet may arguably be best for short burst high intensity exercise, they see equal or better performance by ultra-endurance athletes at various levels of carb restriction.
                        It would be great if you could link to the studies you are referring to.
                        My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Gorbag View Post
                          I can definitely see a value of getting adapted to performing in ketosis, and that it can give you an edge in endurance sports, since those events often ending up in lack of enough carbs anyway. But I don't think that any serious endurance athlete will compete without first filling up on hundreds of hundreds of grams of carbs the days before an important event and also get plenty of "refill" of fast acting carbs under the competition. Endurance athletes super-compensate carbs to max out their glycogen levels for a good reason, to avoid "the bonk!" - which is a very serious threat to every competing endurance athlete...

                          And no, I am not a MD either, why?
                          Western States 100 – Low Carber Wins Ultramarathon – Steve Phinney and Jeff Volek Study | Me and My Diabetes

                          Very few carbs, running in ketosis, and not only won, but knocked 21 minutes off the course record ... in one of the most grueling 100-milers.

                          See also - Steve Phinney – Low-Carb preserves Glycogen better than High Carb | Me and My Diabetes

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Thanks, Annlee. Sorry Jake -- I don't have links to post (ok, I'm technologically challenged, LOL) but the book I mentioned has pages of references.
                            Starting Weight: 197.5
                            Current Weight: 123
                            Far healthier!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Annlee View Post
                              Western States 100 – Low Carber Wins Ultramarathon – Steve Phinney and Jeff Volek Study | Me and My Diabetes

                              Very few carbs, running in ketosis, and not only won, but knocked 21 minutes off the course record ... in one of the most grueling 100-milers.

                              See also - Steve Phinney – Low-Carb preserves Glycogen better than High Carb | Me and My Diabetes
                              It's clear that low carb works well for some, but in most, I think that performance will suffer. Also, they don't provide any details about the diet of the ultramarathon winner other than that it was low carb, so I don't think we can make too many conclusions here.

                              Also, an interesting overview of the debate between Alan Aragon and Jeff Volek on the topic of low carb performance: 2013 NSCA Personal Trainers Conference: Looking Back at my Debate with Dr. Jeff Volek | Alan Aragon's Blog
                              My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by janie View Post
                                Thanks, Annlee. Sorry Jake -- I don't have links to post (ok, I'm technologically challenged, LOL) but the book I mentioned has pages of references.
                                Darn. It would be nice to see the research, but I'm not going to buy the book
                                My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X