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High Cholesterol strikes!

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  • #16
    Hi Stephen-
    I was told by a very knowledgeable nutritionist (who is very familiar with a low carb approach to weight loss), that when a person starts melting off pounds, their total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol values frequently go up. This is b/c the cholesterol that was part of the fat being taken "out of storage" now finds its way into the bloodstream b/f being removed by normal body processes. She recommends waiting 6 months to get a clearer picture of blood lipids.

    I think if you follow the advice you've gotten here to toe the line on Primal, you will likely see great improvement. Sometimes TC and LDL do not budge ---- but reduction in triglycerides and a rise in HDL which is typical for those following a Primal plan, will improve your ratios considerably.

    And I'd get another BP reading as yours was troubling high. It could have been a fluke. Mine is usually 120/80 (usually lower) but in one docs office it is always high. I think he has an equipment (or staff) problem.
    Starting Weight: 197.5
    Current Weight: 123
    Far healthier!

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    • #17
      Check your thyroid.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by StephenUSA View Post
        The prescription was the first treatment option.

        I have been working on losing weight. On Primal, I've gone from 220 to about 174. I'm not sure if weight loss can affect my blood test, but I've read it can have some impact.
        You are getting lots of good advice on here, pretty much all of it is right.

        About the only thing I will add is what you can to to make your numbers better (without taking a statin).

        What's really important is your cholesterol ratios, and the ones that matter are these:
        TotalChol/HDL (ideally < 5)
        Trigs/HDL (ideally < 2)
        LDL/HDL (ideally <4.5)

        Now I'm not going to sugarcoat it, your cholesterol is bad. But you know what will make ALL of your ratios better? HDL is the denominator in all three, so when it goes up, all three ratios will decrease. And you increase HDL by increasing your consumption of quality animal fats.

        You can also make your Trigs go down by lowering carbs slightly.

        And you can improve thyroid function (which will indirectly lower your LDL levels by increasing the number of LDL receptors in your body) by supplementing with Iodine and Selenium.
        Last edited by magicmerl; 06-27-2013, 03:15 PM.
        Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

        Griff's cholesterol primer
        5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
        Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
        TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
        bloodorchid is always right

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        • #19
          Originally posted by janie View Post
          Hi Stephen-
          I was told by a very knowledgeable nutritionist (who is very familiar with a low carb approach to weight loss), that when a person starts melting off pounds, their total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol values frequently go up. This is b/c the cholesterol that was part of the fat being taken "out of storage" now finds its way into the bloodstream b/f being removed by normal body processes. She recommends waiting 6 months to get a clearer picture of blood lipids.
          This seems to be pretty common advice, though I'm not entirely confident of the explanation behind it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by workinprogress View Post
            Your B/P is borderline high also. You don't have to ask your Doctor to wait 6 months, it's your body do as you want. Like you said, you need more info. The VAP profile is a good suggestion. Commit to the primal/paleo lifestyle. I call it a lifestyle because a "Diet" is temporary. Also commit to an exercise regimen. Starting Strength, Westside Barbell, You are your own gym, and Convict Conditioning are all good. There is a good program on this site also. After 6 months to a year, have yourself tested again.
            I don't know what your age and risk factors are, so take those into consideration before following mine or anyone elses advice. Ultimately you know your own condition best.
            FBG was 80, BP 180/78.

            Normal BP is 120/80.....that isn't 'borderline high', that systolic is a stroke waiting to happen....is that a typo?
            The life I have today is far better than I deserve.......

            M, 58, 6'0
            SW - 192
            CW - 180
            GW - 165-170

            Current addiction: ice cream (and sugar in general).....doing battle with it!

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            • #21
              Sorry all, it was a typo.

              My BP was 120/78.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by StephenUSA View Post
                Sorry all, it was a typo.

                My BP was 120/78.
                Thank Heavens. Forget my 'restrict salt' comment.
                "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by martinau
                  Listen man.. What you eat plays a significant role in your cholesterol levels. Eating foods with trans fat or high levels of saturated fat can increase “bad” LDL cholesterol. Foods high in saturated fat include red meat, dairy products, chocolate, and processed foods made with cocoa butter, palm oil, or coconut oil. High levels of dietary cholesterol, found only in foods made from animal sources such as meat and dairy, can also raise your bad cholesterol level. Eating too many calories, in general, can elevate triglycerides.
                  Originally posted by martinau
                  Listen ... What you eat plays a significant role in your cholesterol levels. Eating foods with trans fat or high levels of saturated fat can increase “bad” LDL cholesterol. Foods high in saturated fat include red meat, dairy products, chocolate, and processed foods made with cocoa butter, palm oil, or coconut oil. High levels of dietary cholesterol, found only in foods made from animal sources such as meat and dairy, can also raise your bad cholesterol level. Eating too many calories, in general, can elevate triglycerides.
                  You need a better source of information. Everything you say here is incorrect.

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