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people who eat wheat seem to be doing fine!

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  • It was in relation to the symptomatic response, there was no mention in the post of a specific/active reduction in calories.
    "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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    • So, according to Kresser (and he cites Dr. Kenneth Fine of Entero Lab), a lot of people are gluten intolerant--up to 30% of the population. Most of these people are unaware that they're gluten intolerant because their intolerance does not present as gastrointestinal symptoms. So they could eat gluten and feel "fine." It's just that, after years and decades of consuming gluten, they eventually develop an autoimmune disorder when they're older. The effect of things like HFCS, gluten, and PUFAs are cumulative and chronic so most people are not going to have a sudden, acute reaction to consuming these things. But years and decades of consumption eventually produces problems.

      The Gluten-Thyroid Connection

      My journal

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      • Originally posted by diene View Post
        So, according to Kresser (and he cites Dr. Kenneth Fine of Entero Lab), a lot of people are gluten intolerant--up to 30% of the population. Most of these people are unaware that they're gluten intolerant because their intolerance does not present as gastrointestinal symptoms. So they could eat gluten and feel "fine." It's just that, after years and decades of consuming gluten, they eventually develop an autoimmune disorder when they're older. The effect of things like HFCS, gluten, and PUFAs are cumulative and chronic so most people are not going to have a sudden, acute reaction to consuming these things. But years and decades of consumption eventually produces problems.

        The Gluten-Thyroid Connection
        I recall reading another study by Entero Lab which suggested that of people who gave up gluten with no symptoms (I believe subjects gave up gluten because their entire household went gluten-free because of celiac members), 60% found health benefits.

        This cheap calorie discussion brings to mind growing up in a household whose diet was determined by a crazy health food fanatic who fed us homemade whole grain bread, loads of vegetables, and tons of fatty meat in an era when cooking meals was beginning to be considered a waste of time. We ate lots of desserts, too. Desserts were okay if they were homemade. My mother was opposed to chocolate and fed us lots of carob stuff that tasted like dirt. My father sneaked us chocolate. Lots of my friends and neighbors ate TV dinners every night.

        The composition of our diet was based on the idea that if 1/2 an orange was said to be sufficient daily vitamin C intake to cover all our needs, then all recommendations were nonsense. My mother was scared to death that we might be malnourished because we weren't eating enough healthy food. She was afraid that our food chain was utterly devoid of nutrition due to soil depletion. We were all pretty plump. We took handfuls of vitamins daily. We ate snacks that were the equivalent of food bars, full of supplements like yeast that made them taste like medicine, rather than food. In response I only take supplements that there is a reason to believe I need. And I don't eat food that tastes gross but has some magical or medicinal value.

        At the time (as now) nutrition research done by Harvard was funded by agribusiness, and studies supported eating processed foods and more of them. In particular, the one that zeroed out their credibility was the recommendation that Americans should not limit their intake of sugar, because sugar has calories, and Americans need calories.

        So when I read that Americans should not limit their intake of cereal grains, because cereal grains have calories, and Americans need calories.... Okay. Blast from the past.
        Last edited by eKatherine; 06-26-2013, 07:51 AM.

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        • Originally posted by Omni View Post
          It was in relation to the symptomatic response, there was no mention in the post of a specific/active reduction in calories.
          Then how am I "clutching for straws"? I'm saying that the excess calories had to have played a huge part in the excess weight gain, as they almost always do.
          My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

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          • I know for a fact eating the combo of wheat/sugar/seed oils causes my chronic seborrhea dermatitis to come roaring back within about 2 weeks after eating them for a few days in a row. I haven't figured out which one of those 3 is the more direct cause but I also notice I just feel a hell lot better generally without those things in my diet. I still eat those 3 now and then with family and friends while out dining but never at home...those very few times do not cause issues and I can get away with it.

            I do believe wheat is harming everyone all the time regardless how you feel its just a matter of how much you eat and over a duration of time and your age...

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            • Some people notice a huge difference when they give up wheat, others don't. Personally, I think there's a spectrum of ability to digest wheat. On one end are people like me, who have celiac disease and are sick for days or weeks from the smallest bit of contamination. On the other end are people who can eat pasta and bread every day and never have a problem. I think most people fall somewhere in the middle, where they'd probably be better off without wheat, but it doesn't cause enough symptoms to make them want to give it up. Even if you can digest wheat just fine, it still doesn't mean that it's particularly good for you. Vegetables, fish, meat, fruit, etc. all have more nutrition than wheat. It still best to make it an occasional treat rather than a daily staple.

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              • As long as we're talking about skin rashes...

                Dermatitis herpetiformis, a common symptom that many who have celiac experience.

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                • Originally posted by KT79 View Post
                  Some people notice a huge difference when they give up wheat, others don't. Personally, I think there's a spectrum of ability to digest wheat. On one end are people like me, who have celiac disease and are sick for days or weeks from the smallest bit of contamination. On the other end are people who can eat pasta and bread every day and never have a problem. I think most people fall somewhere in the middle, where they'd probably be better off without wheat, but it doesn't cause enough symptoms to make them want to give it up. Even if you can digest wheat just fine, it still doesn't mean that it's particularly good for you. Vegetables, fish, meat, fruit, etc. all have more nutrition than wheat. It still best to make it an occasional treat rather than a daily staple.
                  I always tolerated wheat just fine. Then I gave it up and realized that I didn't get heartburn anymore, or bloating, or gas. I bet most or maybe even all people who "eat wheat [and] seem to be doing fine" would learn some things if they tried eliminating it for 45 days.
                  The Champagne of Beards

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                  • The Continuum of Gluten Experience
                    1. People who can eat wheat and tolerate it just fine
                    2. People who can eat wheat and think they are tolerating it just fine
                      1. People who eat wheat and have minor symptoms but don't realize they are being caused by wheat
                      2. People who eat wheat and have major symptoms but don't realize they are being caused by wheat
                      3. People who eat wheat and are developing major and possibly irreversible symptoms but don't realize it yet
                    3. People who know eating wheat makes them sick

                    Only some of the people in the last item have a diagnosis. No studies have been done to my knowledge to quantify people in these different groups.

                    This also leaves out many different considerations, such as this one:
                    1. People who are malnourished because they eat too much low-nourishment cereal grain products, displacing healthier foods
                      1. This includes people who are overweight because their malnourished bodies crave the healthy food they ate cereal grain products instead of


                    Etc.

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                    • Originally posted by jakejoh10 View Post
                      Excess calories should undoubtedly shoulder a lot of the blame, no?
                      Wouldn't wheat BE excess calories? And it also stimulates the appetite.
                      Out of context quote for the day:

                      Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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                      • Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                        Wouldn't wheat BE excess calories?
                        Not necessarily, depending on the context.

                        And it also stimulates the appetite.
                        In some people, yes.
                        My nutrition/fitness/critical thinking blog:

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