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Why is coconut oil more preferred to cook with than Lard?

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  • #16
    I use lard, because it comes with the pig, so it is a freebie. Well, pork fat comes with the pig (officially for feeding the birds). Coconut oil is expensive and I use it for direct fat ingestion or if I do not want porky taste. Or if I am particular paranoid about O6 that day.
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    • #17
      In many areas a jar of coconut oil is a lot more widely available than finding decent lard. The supermarket stuff is often CAFO mystery hog + hydrogenated.
      37//6'3"/185

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      • #18
        Been reading about mct oil, the bulletproof one.
        Anyone have much experience with it?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by sting View Post
          why not buy some lard from the butcher and just melt it?
          Yeah, you can certainly render your own lard. It works best if you get the right kind of fat and not just the stuff you cut off the edge of your chops.

          I rendered some duck fat once. I got a quart of fat out of a single duck and it was very tasty and useful.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #20
            I like cooking shrimp in EVCO. Other than that I'll just eat it right off the measuring spoon.

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            • #21
              What about AGE's when cooking meats they talk about the fat piece especially of the steak having the most AGE's, wouldn't this make lard a high AGE's food?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                Coconut oil is a special kind of saturated fat, a medium chain triglyceride. It supposedly has special properties in the body as well as special cooking properties. There is nothing wrong with lard except that it is really difficult to find pork lard that is not partially hydrogenated.
                My butcher gives me fat from free range, organically reared pigs, which I render into lard myself in a slow cooker. Delicious!

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                • #23
                  Most lard is junk today. CAFO lard resembles vegetable oil due to an extremely high PUFA content. CAFO pigs are literally fed soybean oil. Funny thing is, pastured pigs eating a natural diet of grubs, acorns and grasses are higher in PUFA than pigs fed wheat, corn and barley. It would possibly be superior to use grain fed lard as long as they were fed organic, quality grains in a supplemental fashion and not force-fed vegetable oil to fatten them up like in the CAFO system. This is a pretty awesome breakdown at WAPF:

                  Good Lard, Bad Lard: What Do You Get When You Cross a Pig and a Coconut? | Mother Nature Obeyed - Weston A Price Foundation

                  Man, would I love me some coconut-fed pork.

                  I don't see the point of using lard. Butter and coconut oil are superior in terms of lipid profile and both are much more readily available and cheaper. Paying more for an inferior product isn't my style
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Finnegans Wake
                    Lard is only 6-10% PUFA.

                    It is composed primarily of MUFA oleic acid (cf. olive oil) and SFAs.
                    Modern lard is up to 32% PUFA from CAFO sources. The values they use for lard in nutrition databases are decades old. See the study I posted above. Even 100% pastured lard is around 9% PUFA. Compare that to 7% from grain-fed. The big problem is today's pigs are direct-fed soy oil to fatten them up quickly as PUFA shuts down thyroid function and causes massive weight gain. I suppose if you're going to buy 100% pastured lard from a known source (a small farm you can inspect yourself) it would be of decent quality, but again, why not use coconut oil or pastured butter for a fraction of the price? Both are superior.
                    Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                    • #25
                      Butters on that good for high heat cooking

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by sting View Post
                        Butters on that good for high heat cooking
                        Do you do a lot of high heat cooking that butter wouldn't work for? Like what?

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                        • #27
                          Butter, ghee, tallow, or lard are all fine at high temps, next are palm and coconut, olive oil is pretty delicate (because you want the cold press virgin) and oxidizes easily. Stick with animal fats and fry away.


                          Excuse me for any typos and sarcastic remarks, sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                          • #28
                            I have deep-fried in clarified butter and RDB coconut oil. At different times.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                              Do you do a lot of high heat cooking that butter wouldn't work for? Like what?
                              Newbie to cooking, but was told butter is not really for high temp or long cooking as it burns quickly.

                              I did try butter with some seafood and it was OK but it was prawns only which are quick to cook, not sure how it would suit when cooking a steak or something similar...why do you use it for cooking most foods?


                              Originally posted by Techie View Post
                              Butter, ghee, tallow, or lard are all fine at high temps, next are palm and coconut, olive oil is pretty delicate (because you want the cold press virgin) and oxidizes easily. Stick with animal fats and fry away.
                              Hmm i thought coconut oil was best for high temp cooking?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by sting View Post
                                Newbie to cooking, but was told butter is not really for high temp or long cooking as it burns quickly.

                                I did try butter with some seafood and it was OK but it was prawns only which are quick to cook, not sure how it would suit when cooking a steak or something similar...why do you use it for cooking most foods?


                                Hmm i thought coconut oil was best for high temp cooking?
                                From experience.... butter does burn at lower temps than coconut oil. If I'm broiling something (500+ heat) I use coconut oil. Anything under 400 (eggs for instance) butter does great.

                                And BTW you don't need any fat to cook a steak in. The pat of butter goes on top to finish it .

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