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The diet of my people.

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  • #16
    A way of explaining it:
    I am British, raised by British parents and grandparents.
    I am mostly Germanic, with quite a lot of Slavic (from both parents) and some Celtic (from one parent) in me.
    I was raised in Spain, in a Spanish environment, on a Spanish diet.
    But I am phenotypically a Slav.

    Regardless of where most of my genes came from, what my parents ate and what I was raised on, I naturally returned to a Slavic-esque diet when I got in tune with my body. Because, regardless of blood, culture or upbringing, my body is Slavic.
    --
    Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

    --
    I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
    I'd apologize, but...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Kochin View Post
      What European areas?
      Also, in what ways is your diet different from/similar to the traditional foods of either bloodline?
      Mother's side Belgian, French Speaking, so potatoes, mussels, bread (Belgian Waffles), stewed meats. Father's side Mexican: rice, beans, corn tortillas, Apache who knows. I think the combination of the diet and and our genetics has been particularly problematic for the members of my family. Most of my brothers and sisters love baked goods especially bread and are overweight and have difficulty with blood sugar, not to mention wine, Mom's side is used to having it with meals, Dad's side it's
      like a time bomb.
      Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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      • #18
        I'm 85% German, apparently my traditional diet focuses on potatoes, meat, bread and beer. Could be worse, I guess.
        Make America Great Again

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        • #19
          [QUOTE=Kochin;1224511]A way of explaining it:
          I am British, raised by British parents and grandparents.
          I am mostly Germanic, with quite a lot of Slavic (from both parents) and some Celtic (from one parent) in me.
          I was raised in Spain, in a Spanish environment, on a Spanish diet.
          But I am phenotypically a Slav.

          I am Finnish-Canadian, raised by Finnish-Canadian parents on both sides, with a huge emphasis on traditional Finnish foods as we were raised:a lot of fish (fresh and pickled or smoked), wild game, farm foods, garden vegetables, home baking, with processed foods not even considered, other than perhaps dairy, coffee, tea and some herbs and spices. I was in the sauna first at the age of two weeks and at least weekly thereafter until I left for university. The Finnish language was constant in our lives. My Dad's father left Finland for political reasons, and his mother a few years later to be a Finnish nanny; my mother's people came to the Americas to escape poverty. My siblings and I lived a Finnish culture as young children; we ere fluently bilingual. Still today, decades later I see myself connected to the roots of language and struggle from which my family emerged. On the outside I am a middle-aged professional woman, and yet I am also from a different reality.

          It is interesting to note the health of my immediate family, as the 60s and 70s brought more processed foods coupled with more sedentary 'recreation' into our lives...a downhill slide in terms of health overall in my entire family. Luckily, my siblings and I have created good changes, as have many in our extended families.

          All this is so interesting to me because soon I have the good fortune of doing a writer's workshop soon with only 3 other 'writers', and with one of the 5 finalists in "Canada Reads, 2012", Richard Wagamese, at his home. My interest is in the history of my paternal grandmother whom I never knew, and about whom little is known. That interest is coupled with the Kalevala, the epic poem of mythical figures fused with history, and the Rune singers that have kept and added to the now 12,000 lines and sung them over the centuries.

          As a primal and often paleo eater for 2 + year now, I find it real interesting that people are considering this area. ethnicity, and how that connects with what we ingest. It reminded me of what a Cree Elder William Ermine once told us, that our bodies change all the time, cells replacing cells, affected by what we do to those cells. He went on to say that we come from the ground. And that if we eat only local, unprocessed food, after a while, our bodies could be said to come from that local ground, or be Indigenous to it. It rather makes sense to me, yet it is so much more complex, especially when human values enter the picture.
          Last edited by Aili; 06-16-2013, 01:25 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by loafingcactus View Post
            This Finnish example is what I mean- I have Swedish ancestors via my royal lines and "my people" are not Swedish. It is almost statistically impossible that you are not a descendant of Charlemagne, so you have North Africa and Asia Minor in your ancestry. the Swedish Royal family tended to look east, so you likely also have Russian ancestry though I don't know the percentage likelihood of that.
            When they say everyone is a descendant of Charlemagne. They are including marriages. I'm related to my Mother in-law via marriage, not DNA. It's like playing 6 degrees of separation with Kevin Bacon. It doesn't mean that anyone of us share genetic material with someone else, its just that there is a connection on some level.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by workinprogress View Post
              When they say everyone is a descendant of Charlemagne. They are including marriages. I'm related to my Mother in-law via marriage, not DNA. It's like playing 6 degrees of separation with Kevin Bacon. It doesn't mean that anyone of us share genetic material with someone else, its just that there is a connection on some level.
              That only works for one generation- your wife would be a descendant, and if you had children your children would be a descendant. The people who set up these models kinda know what they are doing. ;-)
              “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
              Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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              • #22
                Don't mind me! Posted in the wrong thread - too many tabs open!
                Last edited by upupandaway; 06-16-2013, 01:26 PM.

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                • #23
                  I'm half Slavic. My mother is mostly British. It isn't clear who I inherited my food intolerances from, but they are not known to be common in either place.

                  My boyfriend, on the other hand, is half-Korean and looks totally Asian. He has issues with soy and crucifers, including kimchi.

                  Every time I read the title of this thread I think of the sad cat diary where the cat feels compelled to sing the song of his people.
                  Last edited by eKatherine; 06-16-2013, 03:13 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by loafingcactus View Post
                    That only works for one generation- your wife would be a descendant, and if you had children your children would be a descendant. The people who set up these models kinda know what they are doing. ;-)
                    My wife is the Aunt to my sisters children, and they don't share a genetic relationship. That's what I'm getting at. A good portion of these "relations" are in marriage only. You can only go back 2000 years until everyone is related somehow. Whether that is genetic or marriage.

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                    • #25
                      Well I didn't write "related" I wrote "descended." That is an odd turn. An-y-way...

                      EKatherine brings up another fundamental weakness of the "how you look is what you should eat" theory which is that it assumes that the genes that assigned your face shape are the same genes that assign your immune system and all of the other variables that go into how you process food. That assumption does not seem to be warranted.
                      “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
                      Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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                      • #26
                        My ancestry is from northern European nations close to bodies of water. I could eat fish all day every day forever and ever.
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                        • #27
                          By appearance I think I must have mainly southern European genes. This may explain my affinity for parma ham, and Barcelona FC.
                          Healthy is the new wealthy.

                          http://www.facebook.com/groups/ances...handnutrition/

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                          • #28
                            Southern and Eastern Europe, so I can tolerate lactose with no problem.
                            5'0" female, 45 years old. Started Primal October 31, 2011, at a skinny fat 111.5 lbs. Low weight: 99.5 lb on a fast. Gained back to 115(!) on SAD chocolate, potato chips, and stress. Currently 111.

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                            • #29
                              Each parent is 1/2 Norweigen, one is 1/2 English the other 1/2 Northern Germany. The English line is direct tail-male and can be easily traced back to an English knight in the 1050's. It amazes me that such a long line can be known.

                              Both parent ancestors migrated here early in U.S. history and were fishers, trappers, furriers, and farmers; later they were merchants. For many generation they were in Minn., where many scandinavians were. So I'd guess we have about 2-300 years of Minn. / Scandinavian diet.

                              I look Norweigen and love oily fish, meat of any kind, lots of cheese and milk (although I can't drink it now) and most pickled foods. I've never been fond of veggies, potatoes or bread until I visited Eastern Europe. Even though I'd lived in France for some years, the absolute best bread is in Eastern Europe. Never have I had bread like that. It's so good that if I could have it here I'd be back to eating bread in a heartbeat.

                              My fondest dream would be to have a Master Butcher and a Master Baker in town. Let's throw in a Master CheeseMaker.
                              "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                                Well, I'm part Native American and I like pemmican. Does that count?

                                Most of us are such mixed mutts genetically that the only diet that makes sense is the one that works for you, the individual.

                                If you can trace yourself to "A People" and choose to eat that way, great. Most of us have multiple peoples.
                                Woah! Just now saw your profile pic change. Love your new haircut!
                                My chocolatey Primal journey

                                Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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