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Looking for Primal Camping Food

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  • Looking for Primal Camping Food

    I'm going to be in Yosemite in a week for a week (hooyah!), and I'll have to provide myself with some pack food. It'll amount to about 3 days worth of food. What's the best way to go about this? I realize getting true "primal" pack food will be difficult, so my only hard limit is no gluten.

    Ideas?

  • #2
    Well you could do organic canned tuna and salmon, jerky, your oils, seeds and nuts, dried fruits and veggies that can go a couple days without a fridge.
    Last edited by Paleo0731; 06-12-2013, 02:41 AM.

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    • #3
      This could also be a good time to do some intermittent fasting as well.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Paleo0731 View Post
        Well you could do organic canned tuna and salmon, jerky, your oils, seeds and nuts, dried fruits and veggies that can go a couple days without a fridge.
        Of course... I suppose my ultimate question is going to be weight; got to keep the pack light. Canned fish, jerky, nut/fruit mixes, stable butter (ghee?) sound like my best options. Maybe a little chocolate for morale.

        I guess I was thinking there might be something *different* out there. There are brands of food specifically for backpacking, so I thought there must be some out there who also adhere to primal-like nutritional guidelines. However, then I'm asking:
        1. Is the nutrition more compacted than the foods just listed above? Maybe the food itself is no more dense, but the packaging is a couple pounds lighter? (a big difference)
        2. How much will it cost? Anything like this sounds like a premium food that will be like $20 per day for food needs. Correct me if I'm wrong!

        So any ideas down that line of thinking?

        Originally posted by Paleo0731 View Post
        This could also be a good time to do some intermittent fasting as well.
        I don't want to lose any weight though. Nice idea, but not for me. I fast everyday anyways. I'm often a dinner-only kind of person.

        I'm also planning for survival in the wilderness. You don't plan for survival by ignoring bodily needs because it'll make you tougher or fitter.

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        • #5
          Invest in a good dehydrator. Dehydrate frozen veggies put off to the side. Dehydrate lean ground beef put off to the side. Package them separate for the trip. Rehydrate in a cookpot add either a little butter (if for the first day or two) or a little olive oil for later in the trip plus spices of choice.

          Becareful with the olive oil, some containers leak. A metal alcohol flask has worked best for me.

          Most of the pre packaged hiking food is salt and carb laden junk unfortunately.



          Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
          Of course... I suppose my ultimate question is going to be weight; got to keep the pack light. Canned fish, jerky, nut/fruit mixes, stable butter (ghee?) sound like my best options. Maybe a little chocolate for morale.

          I guess I was thinking there might be something *different* out there. There are brands of food specifically for backpacking, so I thought there must be some out there who also adhere to primal-like nutritional guidelines. However, then I'm asking:
          1. Is the nutrition more compacted than the foods just listed above? Maybe the food itself is no more dense, but the packaging is a couple pounds lighter? (a big difference)
          2. How much will it cost? Anything like this sounds like a premium food that will be like $20 per day for food needs. Correct me if I'm wrong!

          So any ideas down that line of thinking?



          I don't want to lose any weight though. Nice idea, but not for me. I fast everyday anyways. I'm often a dinner-only kind of person.

          I'm also planning for survival in the wilderness. You don't plan for survival by ignoring bodily needs because it'll make you tougher or fitter.

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          • #6
            Oh, larabars. No better time to gorge on larabars than while camping. Energy-dense, storeable, and often to be found at very cheap prices if you shop around.
            Crohn's, doing SCD

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            • #7
              We had quinoa noatmeal (found the recipe by googling) for breakfast on our last backpacking trip - quinoa with cinnamon and dried apricots. It was light, packable, and very tasty!

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              • #8
                For the first trail meal I've had good luck cooking, then freezing, a nice fresh cut of meat. Wrap it in foil, then bag it, then pack some other stuff around it (veggies and the like). The steak will keep 'em cold until dinner, then you can reheat the steak over the campfire.

                As previous poster said, quinoa is a good go-to. You can pre-make it too, then double-ziplock it. Put a few drops of water in at mealtime, drop the ziplock into a pan/bowl on the cookstove to heat up.

                Yosemite is awesome if you get away from the crowds. Where in the park are you going?

                Sent from my GT-N8013 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                • #9
                  USWellness meats makes great sugar and additive free jerky, pemmican, beef sticks, various sausages, that all make very good compact trail food.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BZM View Post
                    For the first trail meal I've had good luck cooking, then freezing, a nice fresh cut of meat. Wrap it in foil, then bag it, then pack some other stuff around it (veggies and the like). The steak will keep 'em cold until dinner, then you can reheat the steak over the campfire.

                    As previous poster said, quinoa is a good go-to. You can pre-make it too, then double-ziplock it. Put a few drops of water in at mealtime, drop the ziplock into a pan/bowl on the cookstove to heat up.

                    Yosemite is awesome if you get away from the crowds. Where in the park are you going?

                    Sent from my GT-N8013 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                    I'm doing a week of training in Bridalveil up at around 7000 ft. All I know is that it's not a public campground. Then, we're doing a 2 day search for a downed airplane from last December.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                      USWellness meats makes great sugar and additive free jerky, pemmican, beef sticks, various sausages, that all make very good compact trail food.
                      I could stretch 2 pounds of pemmican out for a couple days. At 17.5 dollars for food per day, that's not atrocious. I love the thought of eating pemmican, and I love the compact lightness it will have in my pack.

                      Looks like I may have to go back to making my own pemmican! Thanks for the inspiration.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
                        I could stretch 2 pounds of pemmican out for a couple days. At 17.5 dollars for food per day, that's not atrocious. I love the thought of eating pemmican, and I love the compact lightness it will have in my pack.

                        Looks like I may have to go back to making my own pemmican! Thanks for the inspiration.
                        You're welcome, Wilton.

                        This: http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

                        is the best make it yourself pemmican manual out there. I did some research into it and all the other ones were quoting this guy.
                        It is kind of a pain to make but, if you are up for the effort it turns out really delicious and more "shelf stable" than the USWM ones which go kinda mushy in warm weather.

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                        • #13
                          *shifty eyes* *sidles over* I gotta mention... have you looked at dog treats? For pure protein, nothing beats freeze dried duck. That was the only ingredient, duck. XD I was curious so I tried them and while they were lacking any kind of spice they weren't bad.

                          ...Yes, I ate dog food. What?!?

                          Edited to add: Pemmican would no doubt be better for a long time... this was more a single day thing. And I had some fattier stuff with me like tinned oysters as well as fresh fruit and veg.
                          Out of context quote for the day:

                          Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                            *shifty eyes* *sidles over* I gotta mention... have you looked at dog treats? For pure protein, nothing beats freeze dried duck. That was the only ingredient, duck. XD I was curious so I tried them and while they were lacking any kind of spice they weren't bad.

                            ...Yes, I ate dog food. What?!?

                            Edited to add: Pemmican would no doubt be better for a long time... this was more a single day thing. And I had some fattier stuff with me like tinned oysters as well as fresh fruit and veg.
                            I've actually eaten my dog's treats before when there's nothing else around. That's another good reminder.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                              You're welcome, Wilton.

                              This: http://www.traditionaltx.us/images/PEMMICAN.pdf

                              is the best make it yourself pemmican manual out there. I did some research into it and all the other ones were quoting this guy.
                              It is kind of a pain to make but, if you are up for the effort it turns out really delicious and more "shelf stable" than the USWM ones which go kinda mushy in warm weather.
                              I'll check it out, thanks.

                              PS- remember when we got into a big argument a couple years ago? Looks like things have changed.

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