Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Im lactose intolerant, is eating lacto fermented food ok?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Im lactose intolerant, is eating lacto fermented food ok?

    My boyfriend makes the best kimchi I've ever had. Its like any old kimchi recipe +1/4 cup or so of whey which he drains off of yogurt (he puts it in a cheese cloth over night). Usually I can't eat even a little dairy without issues, and I ate some of this and was fine but I'm worried about over doing it. I also wonder if it is it not as beneficial to my gut the way regular kimchi would be because of the whole milk issues thing. Anyone have any insight on this? Thank you!
    "...You sort of start thinking anything's possible if you've got enough nerve.” -Ginny

    My story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/i-now...#axzz2MzPtxo00

  • #2
    Well, lactic acid is not lactose. If I understand the process, anything resembling a sugar disappears as bug food. Eating mountains of kimchi will probably cause gut strangeness for anyone but if you can handle 1-2 oz. as an appetizer go for it.
    37//6'3"/185

    My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

    Comment


    • #3
      Not only is it ok, but an imbalance of intestinal bacteria might be causing your issues with dairy, so it might even help a little bit!

      But tread lightly if you test it.
      "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

      Comment


      • #4
        No this should not be a problem.

        The amount of lactose present in 1/4 cup of whey drained off some yogurt is already pretty darned scant... just traces.
        And that, once diluted in a big batch of fermented veg and their accompanying juices. No issue at all.
        “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
        ~Friedrich Nietzsche
        And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
          No this should not be a problem.

          The amount of lactose present in 1/4 cup of whey drained off some yogurt is already pretty darned scant... just traces.
          And that, once diluted in a big batch of fermented veg and their accompanying juices. No issue at all.
          You don't even need whey to lacto-ferment veggies. Most contain enough lactic acid on their own to start fermenting without it.
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

          Comment


          • #6
            If you're lactose intolerant, your biggest problem would be milk. I understand the lactase contained in fermented dairy like hard aged cheeses and yogurt are much more tolerable to your stomach. Your kimchi should be fine to eat.
            F 28/5'4/100 lbs

            "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

            Comment


            • #7
              Well what you guys all mean to say is vegetables have enough of the bacteria lactobacillus present to start the fermentation process from a brine. The only thing the whey does is jumpstart this with an extra shot of that bacterium. As the process goes on there are different stages at which different bacteria are selected for and hence allowed to continue the process . The stage of consumption is that which has lactobacillus acidophilus (meh, not a spelling expert) is dominant and produces lactic acid as a byproduct. Other types of bacterium cannot stand the high acid enviroment and whala ... you have preservation. I've geeked out on this for a while. "Wild Fermentation" was the first book I read on it and I still use those "recipes" mainly, but "The Art of Fermentation" takes a bit of a deeper look.

              But I realize this is more about the whey and agree that it should be a non-issue.
              Last edited by Neckhammer; 06-08-2013, 11:15 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                Well what you guys all mean to say is vegetables have enough of the bacteria lactobacillus present to start the fermentation process from a brine. The only thing the whey does is jumpstart this with an extra shot of that bacterium. As the process goes on there are different stages at which different bacteria are selected for and hence allowed to continue the process . The stage of consumption is that which has lactobacillus acidophilus (meh, not a spelling expert) is dominant and produces lactic acid as a byproduct. Other types of bacterium cannot stand the high acid enviroment and whala ... you have preservation. I've geeked out on this for a while. "Wild Fermentation" was the first book I read on it and I still use those "recipes" mainly, but "The Art of Fermentation" takes a bit of a deeper look.

                But I realize this is more about the whey and agree that it should be a non-issue.
                You tell me. I'm staring at my copy of "The Art of Fermentation" on my desk right now. I love how he kind of chides Sally Fallon Morell for gushing over whey starters in her recipes. Heh. He's all like "you can, I guess, but really... Why?"
                "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Wow, thanks for the info everyone! Im so glad I can keep enjoying this kimchi
                  "...You sort of start thinking anything's possible if you've got enough nerve.” -Ginny

                  My story: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/i-now...#axzz2MzPtxo00

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X