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Worst/Best foods if primal choices aren't available?

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  • #16
    It's New Mexico and it's rural and SAD people are telling you there's nothing to eat. Imo it sounds like lingua in fresh tortilla with salsa is a highly possible thing to encounter. xD

    There's tons of authentic and fresh local mexican food here in So California, I don't think you'll be any worse off in rural NM. The more south you go, the more authentic the food becomes. Trust me on this. :P

    Besides, 'm sure there are plenty of places to get fried eggs and meats, or steak. Honestly I just think you're making this out to be harder than it is.

    What is a few meals fried in canola oil compared to the opportunity of a lifetime? *shrug*
    yay!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
      LOL, Choco. New Mexico.
      DAMN IT!

      OK, fine. That being said, you STILL should be able to find fresh tortillas down there!!! If I were living in New Mexico for lunch I'd be eating Mexican food every day. Fresh masa harina tortillas, grilled steak and queso fresco with homemade pico de gallo. EVERY. DAMN. DAY. That is darn good food, and darn good for you.

      I'm on the fence about beans. Even when soaked and rinsed, they still produce a lot of gas. They're just not an easily digestible food. I don't think they're bad like wheat flour, soy and PUFA oils, but I avoid them anyway. I'm not really missing much so I see no reason to eat them.
      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
        DAMN IT!

        OK, fine. That being said, you STILL should be able to find fresh tortillas down there!!! If I were living in New Mexico for lunch I'd be eating Mexican food every day. Fresh masa harina tortillas, grilled steak and queso fresco with homemade pico de gallo. EVERY. DAMN. DAY. That is darn good food, and darn good for you.

        I'm on the fence about beans. Even when soaked and rinsed, they still produce a lot of gas. They're just not an easily digestible food. I don't think they're bad like wheat flour, soy and PUFA oils, but I avoid them anyway. I'm not really missing much so I see no reason to eat them.
        hell yes. im actually jealous. i want to go to rural NM now. :P
        yay!

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        • #19
          I put potatoes, sweet or white, wrapped in paper towels in the microwave. Best way to make them, in my opinion.

          I cut up vegetables such as cauliflower, broccoli, beets, carrots, squash, etc and put them in a ceramic bowl with a small amount of water. I put another ceramic bowl inverted on top and put it in the microwave. This is how I make vegetables daily.

          I will have bed of veggies and/or potatoes in my bowl with a pile of chopped up meat on top and salsa for seasoning, and sometimes butter or olive oil as well. I eat this every day for breakfast and lunch. I suppose you can look for rotisserie chickens since you have no oven for roasting, or perhaps there are other sources of cooked meat that you can purchase and keep in the fridge. Canned seafood and meats, for example. You can cook seafood in the microwave easily, but I think other kinds of meat get a little rubbery. I haven't tried ground beef. That might be okay in the microwave.

          I used to have an electric one-burner "hot plate." It was basically a one-burner electric stove. It was great. Just that and a mini-fridge, which served as my stove-top and counter, in a tiny garage apartment was plenty to cook up all kinds of stuff.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #20
            I agree. Mexican food is about the most primal you can get---if it's authentic. Stear clear of Taco Bell and Chipotle, they fry their "food" in soybean oil. But if you're lucky enough to be in a town rural and remote enough to not have fast food chains, you'll highly likely get the real, authentic Mexican food.
            Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

            Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
            Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
            Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
            F/23/5'9"

            26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

            Comment


            • #21
              Like Katherine said make sure you have a knife and a small cutting board. I wouldn't bother with extra cooking equipment, hot plate or rice cooker; it's too much to haul.

              I would make sure I had butter or cream and lemons or limes in the fridge at all times. I stayed with my son in the hospital for 3 weeks and I kept those things on hand; pretty much anything can be improved with those additions. Like someone mentioned you can buy frozen veggies locally, I would add sweet potatoes, eggs, canned fish. At the market you should be able to get jicama, radishes and various fruits, fruit keep well and requires no cooking. At the Mexican restaurants you can always order carne asada, pollo asada, carnitas, all the these are made w/o flour, some of the sauce dishes (like chili colorado) are thickened with flour. You can order these meats to go (with fresh salsa of course) and take them back to your room to have with your cooked sweet potato or quinoa and fruit.

              I just remembered 2 other things I kept on hand: dark chocolate and almond butter.
              Last edited by Urban Forager; 06-06-2013, 10:59 AM.
              Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by kathleen View Post
                I agree. Mexican food is about the most primal you can get---if it's authentic. Stear clear of Taco Bell and Chipotle, they fry their "food" in soybean oil. But if you're lucky enough to be in a town rural and remote enough to not have fast food chains, you'll highly likely get the real, authentic Mexican food.
                Fun Fact: Chipotle's Carnitas are not fried in soybean oil! (They aren't fried at all, braised only: Pork, Lard, Bay Leaf, Salt, Black Pepper, Thyme, Juniper Berries) And they are pretty good, though not crispy as I prefer. Chipotle was a fave fast food stop for me while I had classes and didn't have a good way to grab dinner.

                lettuce, double helping carnitas, huge helping of their "mild salsa" (tomato heavy pico de gallo basically) and omfg so good. :x
                yay!

                Comment


                • #23
                  Make friends with the concierge at the hotel - they are an invaluable resource.

                  If you're driving there, make an exception and go to Malwart for a cooler on wheels. That sucker saved my ass on the road two years ago, and now I store stuff in it when I'm not using it. I got the largest one I could fit into my small car. I filled it with lox, goat cheese, well-made cold cuts, hard cheeses, olives, pickles, jerky (from Whole Foods), etc. - I can live on stuff like that forever. I also brought along my own coffee, coffee grinder, and travel coffee maker, even though I rarely needed the last on the road as even Motel 8s now have drip coffee makers in the rooms. You can find ice at almost any gas station along the way.

                  NM, AZ, TX and the like have a lot of great Mexican food, so don't shy away from it. You won't die from the occasional serving of refried beans (especially if they do them in lard as they should), and the occasional tortilla (though I'd avoid tortillas just on principal because I'm a big anti-corn nut).

                  If the hotel won't kick you out for cooking in your room, or they offer suites with kitchens, you're set, and the worst that can happen is that you have to live CAFO meats and conventionally grown produce for awhile. Here are some electric burners you can bring with you if there are no kitchen suites: Amazon.com: electric burner: Home & Kitchen Put a few dozen pastured eggs and some pastured butter in that big ass cooler and you're set for emergencies. Don't forget a frying pan. Oops, I see that NATLES already mentioned an electic skillet, and that would be even better since it's only one item rather than two.

                  SPAM - the traditional/original one has almost nothing that isn't primal. It's CAFO to be sure, but it travels well and needs no refigeration.

                  One month of CAFO won't kill you. McD's might. heh. If the hotel has a restaurant, go to the concierge and tell them what you're looking for in a meal and see if s/he can help you.
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by qqemokitty View Post
                    Fun Fact: Chipotle's Carnitas are not fried in soybean oil! (They aren't fried at all, braised only: Pork, Lard, Bay Leaf, Salt, Black Pepper, Thyme, Juniper Berries) And they are pretty good, though not crispy as I prefer. Chipotle was a fave fast food stop for me while I had classes and didn't have a good way to grab dinner.

                    lettuce, double helping carnitas, huge helping of their "mild salsa" (tomato heavy pico de gallo basically) and omfg so good. :x
                    According to their website, *all* of their meats contain soy:
                    Chipotle: Special Diet Information


                    I learned this the hard way. I got very sick the next day after eating Chipotle. Turns out the only thing I ate that *didn't* have soy was the cheese and lettuce in my salad.
                    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

                    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
                    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
                    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
                    F/23/5'9"

                    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by kathleen View Post
                      According to their website, *all* of their meats contain soy:
                      Chipotle: Special Diet Information


                      I learned this the hard way. I got very sick the next day after eating Chipotle. Turns out the only thing I ate that *didn't* have soy was the cheese and lettuce in my salad.
                      Also according to their website, their carnitas do not. :P I also asked them to make sure, when I first heard about it. Thats where I pulled the ingredients list from, and I can confirm from frequent eating that their carnitas are not fried. YMMV.

                      Chipotle: Ingredients Statement
                      yay!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by kathleen View Post
                        According to their website, *all* of their meats contain soy:
                        Chipotle: Special Diet Information


                        I learned this the hard way. I got very sick the next day after eating Chipotle. Turns out the only thing I ate that *didn't* have soy was the cheese and lettuce in my salad.
                        Their grill is coated in soybean oil to prevent sticking, so anything grilled will contain soy.

                        The pork carnitas are not grilled. They are soy free as stated.

                        You can go there and eat a rice bowl with carnitas, cheese, sour cream, lettuce and their fresh and hot salsas and remain in compliance if rice is okay. I'd get the rice for sure. Everything else is pretty much contaminated with soy, though.
                        Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          When I was in Aruba, every morning I made eggs in the microwave and some bacon in the microwave. I bought the stuff at a corner store along with some local cheese. Super easy. Just scramble the eggs and cook them for a minute or two. Crumble in bacon and some cheese. Done.

                          Then eat at the mexican joint. Guac, meat, salsa. Splurge, have a margarita.

                          http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                          Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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                          • #28
                            By the way, some of the BEST restaurants are in the middle of nowhere. The biggest suck is when the only option is fast food. But the local diner can feed you real bacon and eggs cooked in butter. Or you might find yourself in tiny Boulder Utah where you can get a grass fed steak from the ranch next door with organic veggies. Yeah, you might do a lot of "20%". But it beats eating nuts and beef jerky for a week.

                            http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                            Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                              Their grill is coated in soybean oil to prevent sticking, so anything grilled will contain soy.

                              The pork carnitas are not grilled. They are soy free as stated.

                              You can go there and eat a rice bowl with carnitas, cheese, sour cream, lettuce and their fresh and hot salsas and remain in compliance if rice is okay. I'd get the rice for sure. Everything else is pretty much contaminated with soy, though.
                              It says their rice contains soy.

                              I'm not disagreeing with you guys, but as someone with a bad soy allergy, I will not risk patronizing there.
                              Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

                              Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
                              Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
                              Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
                              F/23/5'9"

                              26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Oh wow they put soybean oil in their rice? Ughh. Why? That's just an unnecessary expense!
                                Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

                                Comment

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