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  • Question about homemade mayo

    I have made homemade mayo many times. I use an immersion blender on the highest speed which allows me to put all ingredients in at once and blend up with no problem. Twice thoughit hasn't blended up. The first time I assumed it was because the eggs were past the date on the carton. I have found that organic eggs are fine well past the date for frying or boiling but assumed that was why it didn't blend up for the mayo. Today it didn't blend up and these eggs are 2 weeks before the date on the carton. Does anyone know why they are not working for mayo? Also, I hate to waste 8 oz of olive oil so is it ok to use the mixture towards a slightly creamy salad dressing? Does the fact that when the egg does emulsify properly make it safer to eat than when it doesn't? I am pretty sure I know the answer to that since people eat raw eggs, but figured I would ask. Thanks in advance for any help.

  • #2
    Originally posted by mvheartscw View Post
    I have made homemade mayo many times. I use an immersion blender on the highest speed which allows me to put all ingredients in at once and blend up with no problem. Twice thoughit hasn't blended up. The first time I assumed it was because the eggs were past the date on the carton. I have found that organic eggs are fine well past the date for frying or boiling but assumed that was why it didn't blend up for the mayo. Today it didn't blend up and these eggs are 2 weeks before the date on the carton. Does anyone know why they are not working for mayo?
    This can be inscrutable.

    Also, I hate to waste 8 oz of olive oil so is it ok to use the mixture towards a slightly creamy salad dressing?
    It's ok.

    Does the fact that when the egg does emulsify properly make it safer to eat than when it doesn't?
    It should make no difference.

    Comment


    • #3
      From here: How to Make Mayonnaise

      The final tip for how to make mayonnaise is that all ingredients should be at room temperature. And it's best if the humidity is low in the room; so no pots boiling away at the same time as you make homemade mayonnaise.
      "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

      B*tch-lite

      Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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      • #4
        I always use mayo that was not to be as a dressing

        I also managed to fix mayo a few times by putting it in the fridge, adding a bit more oil (that is my common problem) and zooping it up again in the Magic bullet. Funnily the first time round it emulsifies better at a room temp.
        My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
        When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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        • #5
          I use an immersion blender and have never had any issues, but I pulse the blender until all ingredients are mixed well, then go full speed. I put all the ingredients in a 2 C glass pyrex measuring cup, start pulsing making sure the blender is touching the bottom of the cup, once the mayo starts coming together I go full speed and slowly raise the blender. Works everytime. I'll see if I can find the video I used for this

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          • #6
            Has anyone had any success using a regular blender or food processor? It's all I've got in my kitchen and man, do I really want to make homemade mayo. Also, recipe?

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            • #7
              I always use a regular blender. You put the eggs in the blender first and drizzle in the oil while blending. Stop and stir occasionally if it gets thick and forms pockets of oil.

              Comment


              • #8
                My way to always succeed mayo:

                0. (I added it last, that's why it's zero) - ALWAYS USE FRESH EGGS!!!
                1. All ingredients must be at room temperature, I found at my expenses that this is fundamental
                2. Use the egg-blender tool (the one that looks a wired light bulb, to be clear)
                3. Add some lemon juice, very little water and salt to the yolks. Also add finely ground nutmeg if you like it.
                4. Mix everything
                5. Start adding oil of olive (or any other vegetable oil of your preference) drop by drop, keep mixing
                6. Keep adding and mixing until thick

                You can use melted butter as well, just not too hot or you will cook the yolks.
                I haven't tried coconut oil, I was planning to do it one of these next weekends, now I said it and don't have excuses anymore, I must try it.

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                • #9
                  I alway blend room temp egg yolk with some lemon juice and mustard powder then slowly added oil until emulsified then pour in rest. Using emersion blender.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is so easy and always perfect with a food processor that has the attachment for oil dispensing (it is also used for pushing food down the chute but also has a tiny hole for dispensing oil). The attachment fits into the chute - just pour the oil in, and it streams through the hole while the processor is running.

                    For small batches, this one works great - fast to make and easy cleanup - Amazon.com: Cuisinart DFP-3 Handy Prep 3-Cup Food Processor: Kitchen & Dining

                    Unless I am out of mayo and in a hurry, I prefer to do large batches with my 11 cup food processor, so do not have to go through the process for a few months, and it is always in the fridge. But, it does require whey for it to keep more than a few weeks. So easy though - to make whey, place high quality plain yogurt in a strainer lined with cheese cloth placed over a bowl. Cover with a plate and leave out at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours while the whey runs out into the bowl. Store the whey in the frig (keeps for several months). The yogurt is now greek yogurt - pour back into the container - yogurt will keep for at least a few weeks.

                    For one batch of mayo, use...
                    1 whole egg, at room temperature
                    1 egg yolk at room temperature
                    1 teaspoon dijon-type mustard
                    1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (original recipe is lemon juice, but I prefer ACV)
                    1 tablespoon whey (optional)
                    3/4 - 1 cup oil (I use a combination of high quality olive oil and MCT oil)
                    generous pinch of sea salt or to taste.

                    Without whey, keeps about 2 weeks. With whey, keeps for several months. If using whey, let the mayo sit at room temperature, covered (I pour into several glass canning jars), for 7 hours before refrigerating.

                    This info is in the book, Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You don't need a blender or food processor. I always make mine with a simple, cheapo handheld mixer from Walmart < $10

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I always make mayo with a handheld whisk in a mixing bowl, mostly because cleanup is really easy.
                        I never let the egg yolk come to room temperature. Your oil should be at room temperature in the first place.
                        The key to emulsification is having enough water, whether that is through vinegar, lemon juice, or just adding water. I recommend reading Michael Ruhlman's "Ratio" for a great explanation of how to make mayo and why everything works the way it does. But basically the key is having enough water and starting slowly with the oil.

                        Also if your mayo "breaks" and turns into an oil soup, you can save it by getting out a fresh bowl, putting a little bit of water in it, and slowly whisking your oily soup into the water as if you were using it to make a new batch of mayo.

                        My favorite oil lately for mayo is macadamia nut oil. Surprisingly inexpensive on Amazon and soooo good.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Egg Carton Dates

                          FYI, the date on the egg carton doesn't necessarily indicate their freshness. It indicates the last date the eggs can be sold as the grade labelled on the carton, before being returned to the processing plant, re-graded, re-packaged, and re-shipped to your supermarket or corporate food processor at a lower grade, with a new "sell by" date. Yes, this is legal, and common practice according to the head of the Poultry Science department at a reputable agricultural university who gave a very enlightening lecture I attended a few months ago.

                          And that is why I raise my own eggs from my own little feathered critters instead of buying them

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by youtacolot View Post
                            Also if your mayo "breaks" and turns into an oil soup, you can save it by getting out a fresh bowl, putting a little bit of water in it, and slowly whisking your oily soup into the water as if you were using it to make a new batch of mayo.
                            I never heard this. I have removed a jar of congealed broken mayo from the fridge and will test it shortly.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by NewfMom View Post
                              It is so easy and always perfect with a food processor that has the attachment for oil dispensing (it is also used for pushing food down the chute but also has a tiny hole for dispensing oil). The attachment fits into the chute - just pour the oil in, and it streams through the hole while the processor is running.

                              For small batches, this one works great - fast to make and easy cleanup - Amazon.com: Cuisinart DFP-3 Handy Prep 3-Cup Food Processor: Kitchen & Dining

                              Unless I am out of mayo and in a hurry, I prefer to do large batches with my 11 cup food processor, so do not have to go through the process for a few months, and it is always in the fridge. But, it does require whey for it to keep more than a few weeks. So easy though - to make whey, place high quality plain yogurt in a strainer lined with cheese cloth placed over a bowl. Cover with a plate and leave out at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours while the whey runs out into the bowl. Store the whey in the frig (keeps for several months). The yogurt is now greek yogurt - pour back into the container - yogurt will keep for at least a few weeks.

                              For one batch of mayo, use...
                              1 whole egg, at room temperature
                              1 egg yolk at room temperature
                              1 teaspoon dijon-type mustard
                              1 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar (original recipe is lemon juice, but I prefer ACV)
                              1 tablespoon whey (optional)
                              3/4 - 1 cup oil (I use a combination of high quality olive oil and MCT oil)
                              generous pinch of sea salt or to taste.

                              Without whey, keeps about 2 weeks. With whey, keeps for several months. If using whey, let the mayo sit at room temperature, covered (I pour into several glass canning jars), for 7 hours before refrigerating.

                              This info is in the book, Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.

                              Ohh, this is helpful! The book is on my shelf Thank you.

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