Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Adapting non-Primal recipes

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Adapting non-Primal recipes

    I don't have a ton of weight to lose, maybe 5 lbs or so of fat. I'm trying to lose another inch or so from my waist/hips.

    I know that the less you have to lose, sometimes the harder it is. I try to be pretty primal, but I do use heavy cream and butter, and have never had any problems with dairy. I'm not actively trying to stay away from yogurt or cheese, but I just am not really craving it.

    I've noticed some people are very strict regarding turning non-primal meals into primal ones, and say that if you really want to lose fat, it is pretty impossible to substitute foods. I was using SoG's dessert recipes, but have stopped in case that inhibits the loss of the fat I want to get rid of.

    I have a hard time just eating steamed/grilled/baked/sauteed foods all the time without making them "into" something. For example, last night I ate chicken in a tarragon mushroom cream sauce with a little green beans. It doesn't have anything but mushrooms, chicken, heavy cream, butter, seasonings, and a little all-natural chicken broth that I make myself. So it's not strictly primal or made in a primal manner (if that makes sense), but it doesn't have real bad things in it. I also only use organic meat and dairy.

    So far I am making decent progress, but do you think actual dishes instead of strict, just plain meat/eggs/fish/veggies makes a big difference?

    I get kind of bored and like to make french, italian, and indian sauces without flours/sugars obv...

    What are your thoughts? Do primal recipes (that include cream/butter/ghee) makes you lose slower than just plain things?

  • #2
    As far as I know, it's all about the ingredients, not so much the form. I make dishes all the time and have had no problem with weight loss. Of course, I'm not at the point you are and still have a bit of fat to lose... I have heard of people removing dairy to lose the last bit of stubborn fat, so in a dish like the one you mentioned, you could easily use a can of unsweetened coconut milk in place of the heavy cream for a similar effect. Otherwise, I don't think there is anything holding you back from "cooking" instead of just having plain/boring things.

    Comment


    • #3
      Perhaps picking up a copy of the PB Cookbook will help:


      http://www.primalnutrition.com/prima...paign=cookbook
      God is great, beer is good, people are crazy

      Trashy Women
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bz8Yptnh2kg
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYkG3...eature=related

      Beef Cake's Primal Hardcore Porn<strike>Erotica<strike>...er...I mean my journal...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Beef Cake View Post
        Perhaps picking up a copy of the PB Cookbook will help:
        LOL I wish we could "like" posts, that made me smile (and is fantastic advice!)

        Comment


        • #5
          Believe me, I will definitely get a copy - the ads have already ingrained themselves in my brain

          I cant think of the actual posts at the moment, but I get the drift from some people that primal recipes are more for maintenance than fat loss, especially if you are substituting something, like a little coconut flour instead of wheat flour. I don't really make fake CW foods (like primal chocolate cake or something), but I do like to make entrees instead of just plain items.

          Some days I meticulously calculate what I eat just to check, and I'm always under 75 g carbs.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't see anything un primal about sauces as long as they don't have a bunch of sugar or nasty chemicals. I often make mushroom cream sauces, or dijon white wine sauce, or coconut curry... sauces and seasonings keeps this from being a boring diet for me and changes it into a culinary adventure.
            The more I see the less I know for sure.
            -John Lennon

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lil_earthmomma View Post
              I don't see anything un primal about sauces as long as they don't have a bunch of sugar or nasty chemicals. I often make mushroom cream sauces, or dijon white wine sauce, or coconut curry... sauces and seasonings keeps this from being a boring diet for me and changes it into a culinary adventure.
              this. otherwise you end up with the PB version of the 'chicken and steamed vegetables' rut of CW diets.
              sigpic

              HANDS OFF MY BACON :: my primal journal

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Sarahrob2248 View Post
                I don't really make fake CW foods (like primal chocolate cake or something), but I do like to make entrees instead of just plain items.
                I use a menu service that I sometimes have to modify one or two ingredients or skip a side altogether. It breaks down the nutrients, including carbs to let you know immediately what you are getting.

                Relish Relish is the name. http://www.relishrelish.com/

                I like it because it also gives you a shopping list. I have used other services including one run by a chef that made you custom meals, but I find it is pretty easy to pick 5 meals from the weekly list or from their database that fit the Primal Blueprint lifestyle and also give you interesting variety and combination's that I hadn't thought of. Sometimes I just use the recipe as a base and doctor it up PB style. The beautiful thing about Relish is they stress fresh ingredients and making pretty much everything from scratch. By making everything from scratch, you can control what goes in to each sauce, etc. I was surprised at how many wonderful recipes I can eat that are very primal.

                Here is an example (the only thing I would substitute would be almond flour for the all purpose flour and I would leave the skin on the pastured chicken):

                Sauteed Chicken with Mustard Sauce KF
                Prep and cook time: 20 minutes

                1/2 cup all purpose flour
                4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
                coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
                2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
                2 green onions , minced
                3/4 cup chicken broth
                1/2 cup dry white wine
                2 tablespoons butter
                2 tablespoons fresh tarragon, chopped
                1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard

                Calories: 266kcal; Protein 4g, Total Fat 12g ,Sat. 6gChol. 28mg, Carb. 38g Fiber 2g, Sodium 200mg
                [1] Place flour on a shallow dish. Rinse chicken and pat and season with salt and pepper. Dredge chicken in flour, shaking off excess.
                [2] In a large skillet, heat half of oil over medium-high heat. Cook chicken until golden brown, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate and tent with foil.
                [3] Heat remaining oil same skillet. Add green onion and cook over medium heat until softened, about 1 minute. Stir in broth and wine, scraping up any browned bits. Simmer until slightly thickened, about 7 minutes. Remove skillet from heat and whisk in butter, tarragon and mustard and any extra chicken juices. Season with salt. Spoon sauce over the chicken to serve.

                Side dish:
                Roasted Baby Carrots
                Prep and cook time: 30-40 minutes

                1 1/2 pounds baby carrots
                1 yellow onion , cut into large wedges
                1 teaspoon dried rosemary
                1 tablespoon olive oil
                1 garlic clove(s), minced
                coarse salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
                per serving: 266 calories; 4 grams protein; 15 grams total fat; 4 grams fiber; 2 grams saturated fat; 38 grams carbohydrates; 28 mgs cholesterol; 200 mgs sodium Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

                [1] In a large bowl, gently toss together the carrots, onion, rosemary and olive oil. Lay out on a rimmed baking pan. Sprinkle with garlic and salt and pepper.
                [2] Roast for 30 to 40 minutes on middle rack or bottom rack, until well browned.
                Last edited by Beef Cake; 04-23-2010, 01:36 PM.
                God is great, beer is good, people are crazy

                Trashy Women
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bz8Yptnh2kg
                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYkG3...eature=related

                Beef Cake's Primal Hardcore Porn<strike>Erotica<strike>...er...I mean my journal...

                Comment


                • #9
                  I make various curries frequently with cauliflower instead of rice, and every once in a while Thai/Chinese/Italian dishes with spaghetti squash instead of noodles. Totally doable.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I guess I am a little confused, your chicken and tarragon recipe sounds great, lots of people here use heavy cream. Thickening is a topic that comes up here frequently and can be a bit problematic. But butter and cream always help the consistency of any sauce.
                    It's grandma, but you can call me sir.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      When I was a kid, I hated dishes that contained a lot of ingredients. I didn't care if different foods touched each other, but I'd rather eat things separately than all mixed up. This frustrated my dear mother very much, and she would shake her head and say 'but it all ends up in the same place!' So, many years later, with that in mind, as long as you're okay with ingredients separately, combining them should have no effect on weight loss. Unless of course you make something so delicious that you eat more than you intended to!
                      "One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well." -- Virginia Woolf

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X