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Flour alternatives primal or not...?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by j3nn View Post
    I heard gelatin can be used in baking but I'm not sure if it always works.
    I used gelatin once. It gave a good texture to the bread, but it melts when you try to toast it. Best eaten cold.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
      I used gelatin once. It gave a good texture to the bread, but it melts when you try to toast it. Best eaten cold.
      Noted!!
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      “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

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      • #18
        Maize - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

        Maize (pron.: /ˈmeɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays L, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), known in some English-speaking countries as corn, is a large grain plant domesticated by indigenous peoples in Mesoamerica in prehistoric times. The leafy stalk produces ears which contain the grain, which are seeds called kernels. Maize kernels are used in cooking as a starch. The Olmec and Mayans cultivated it in numerous varieties throughout Mesoamerica, cooked, ground or processed through nixtamalization. Beginning about 2500 BC, the crop spread through much of the Americas.[1] The region developed a trade network based on surplus and varieties of maize crops. After European contact with the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries, explorers and traders carried maize back to Europe and introduced it to other countries. Maize spread to the rest of the world because of its ability to grow in diverse climates. Sugar-rich varieties called sweet corn are usually grown for human consumption, while field corn varieties are used for animal feed and as chemical feedstocks.

        Maize is the most widely grown grain crop throughout the Americas,[2] with 332 million metric tons grown annually in the United States alone. Approximately 40% of the crop — 130 million tons — is used for corn ethanol.[3] Transgenic maize (genetically modified corn) made up 85% of the maize planted in the United States in 2009.[4]
        "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

        B*tch-lite

        Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
          I don't think you consume as much corn as we do here. But isn't it true that the word "corn" can be a general term that includes any cereal grains?
          We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CavemanJoe View Post
            We call them by their specific names. Corn is corn, wheat is wheat etc.
            For instance, "corned beef" is called that because it traditionally was made by packing meat in grains of salt the size of cereal grains.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
              For instance, "corned beef" is called that because it traditionally was made by packing meat in grains of salt the size of cereal grains.
              Aye that's true, but we don't really use the word corn as a blanket term for grains. The term "grain" includes corn. Corn to us is corn on the cob, sweet corn, corn tortillas...

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              • #22
                Originally posted by j3nn View Post
                I have made gluten-free yeast bread with GF all-purpose flour and it rises just the same. The recipe was on the back of the AP GF flour blend. The brand is Better Batter; made with rice, potato and tapioca. I dislike the xanthan gum, though and prefer to make my own blends. I heard gelatin can be used in baking but I'm not sure if it always works. Perhaps egg white would be a better binder.
                I actually can't eat potato (they block me up bad) so I usually make my own blend... but you know I hear soaked over night chia seeds are the best binder!! I can't wait to use them in recipes. I wont fullly exnay eggs for chia seeds but i'd add it in!!





                So, what I'm hearing is tapico flour will not hurt my gut* Yay!

                Maze (spelling?) is a no no...

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