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  • #16
    Yes, it is all about priorities. I happen to prioritize sleep and workouts over cooking. If I decided to sleep less or skip half my workouts every week, I'd be able to cook more. But guess what, not worth it, especially since I have pretty good alternatives and still do manage to cook from time to time.

    I'd like to have more time to cook, but I don't. I suppose I could work less, but then I wouldn't be able to afford the expensive grass-fed meet, free-range eggs, organic fruits & veggies, organic coconut oil (which I go through jars and jars of--no idea how, but it seems like I got through one jar a month), and other expensive primal foods. This lifestyle is NOT cheap. It's way cheaper to fill up on grains. When I ate oatmeal, I could survive on very little money--oatmeal, eggs (CAFO eggs), bags of (conventional) spinach, and $1.29 cans of sardines. When I subsisted on top ramen and eggs, that was cheaper yet. So in order to afford the healthy food, I have to work more. Thus, less time to cook. There are only 24 hours a day. Something's gotta give.

    My journal

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Damiana View Post
      Yeah. What you said is rather patronizing. I'm lucky enough to be as to have time to prepare and cook for myself and my family, but others aren't so lucky. Kids, work, after-school activities, errands, particularly living in a busy metropolitan area, can all significantly cut down on your time.
      Busy is not an excuse. There is a modern misconception that 'good' food takes hours of time and sweat and professional training. There's also a misconception that 'fast food' is actually fast.

      My parents and my grandparents were no less busy, and far fewer of life's conveniences. And they had no choice but to grow, source, preserve, cook and serve food for the same amount of meals while working full time, raising kids and balancing the family budget. Food was simpler, meals were repetitive, and convenience foods were an expensive luxury. (plus they didn't taste as good as the real thing)

      My mom would get up 15 min early and brown some meat before dumping it in the crock pot before heading to work. Dad would season some chicken pieces and throw them on a pan in the oven on the nights he got home first. Sides were baked potatoes or rice and frozen or canned veggies. We kids learned to cook around age 11-12 and we were each assigned a night to cook. Leftovers were frequent. Casseroles were stacked up in the freezer ready to reheat and serve. Nobody LOVED cooking. Planning what we were going to eat and how it was going to get to the table was simply part of managing the household. Often we were eating early or late or in shifts while we worked around sports and activities, but we ate as a family, at a table, almost every night. Drive thru dinners were simply not in our budget. Plus WE KNEW that was crap food for an occasional treat.
      Sandra
      *My obligatory intro

      There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

      DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

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      • #18
        Eat one meal a day. It saves time.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Sandra in BC View Post
          Busy is not an excuse. There is a modern misconception that 'good' food takes hours of time and sweat and professional training. There's also a misconception that 'fast food' is actually fast.

          My parents and my grandparents were no less busy, and far fewer of life's conveniences. And they had no choice but to grow, source, preserve, cook and serve food for the same amount of meals while working full time, raising kids and balancing the family budget. Food was simpler, meals were repetitive, and convenience foods were an expensive luxury. (plus they didn't taste as good as the real thing)

          My mom would get up 15 min early and brown some meat before dumping it in the crock pot before heading to work. Dad would season some chicken pieces and throw them on a pan in the oven on the nights he got home first. Sides were baked potatoes or rice and frozen or canned veggies. We kids learned to cook around age 11-12 and we were each assigned a night to cook. Leftovers were frequent. Casseroles were stacked up in the freezer ready to reheat and serve. Nobody LOVED cooking. Planning what we were going to eat and how it was going to get to the table was simply part of managing the household. Often we were eating early or late or in shifts while we worked around sports and activities, but we ate as a family, at a table, almost every night. Drive thru dinners were simply not in our budget. Plus WE KNEW that was crap food for an occasional treat.
          Originally posted by smartuko View Post
          Eat one meal a day. It saves time.
          +1 to both. Before McD and Subway, everybody still ate. There are people who change what needs to be changed and people who make excuses about why they can't.
          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

          B*tch-lite

          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Annieh View Post
            I think it's a mindset. In conversation with friends yesterday twice the phrase "life's too short" was issued. Once in relation to housework, and again in relation to baking. As in, Life's too short to spend time to cream the butter and sugar, and to sift the flour. It's quicker to melt the butter throw everything together and hope for the best.

            I was a little shocked, and then again when I realised that once I would have agreed that these things were not worth my time. Now I am beginning to look at things differently, more along the lines of "if a job's worth doing, then it's worth doing properly". (Not that I cream butter and sugar, or sift flour any more, but I whip up omelettes, grill bacon, make soup from scratch, pack lunches etc).
            Ah, but it's not about the difference between creaming the butter and sugar together and sifting the flour. It's between making something from basic ingredients vs making a dessert recipe that calls for as many ingredients if not more, one being a cake mix and another a pudding mix. In the end there is no time saved.

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