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how to cure a huge appetite?

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  • how to cure a huge appetite?

    even though i just ate a huge meal(and its full of fats) i still seem to want food , its very destressing bec im trying to lose weight

  • #2
    Add more veggies, protein and/or starch. Does wonders.
    Dark chocolate and coffee, running through my veins...

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    • #3
      I would eat a lot of fish / organs / meats first. If you are still hungry after that, then fill up with veggies and fruits.

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      • #4
        try Shangri-La diet - google it, or Seth Roberts, the creator.

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        • #5
          But you're very young and an athelete so that appetite is probably there for a reason.

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          • #6
            Some people do not satiate on fat.

            If your primarily mechanism of satiation is proteins, go with leaner meats, egg whites, turkey breast etc, upping your proteins to at leas 1 g per lb of lean body mass.
            If you satiate on starches, add boiled white potatoes
            If you need a combination of starch and fat, try adding up to 1/2 cup of potatoes or sweet potatoes to your meats with every meal
            If your primary satiation is fibre, add avocado or two a day eat copious green veggies, and reduce meats

            Try eating all your meals warm, avoid cold meals

            Restrict fruit to 2 cups a day and give preference to grapefruits, sour apples and berries

            Drink warm bone broth and/or hot lemon-chili peppers and salt master cleanse drink (sans sweetener)

            Supplement fish oil, glucomannan

            Chose cinnamon, chili & fenugreek seeds as your spices...
            My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
            When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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            • #7
              What's "huge"? You could be exercising a lot and restricting too much, in which case your hunger is the need for fuel.

              Excessive hunger is probably a hormonal imbalance.
              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

              - Ray Peat

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              • #8
                You need to give post-prandial satiety some time.

                Dietary fats are not absorbed into the blood stream as other nutrients are. This is principally due to the fact that fats are hydrophobic ( i.e. not soluble in water). Instead, fats are taken up by the lymphatic system and packaged into chylomicrons, which sequester the fats inside of a lipoprotein shell which is itself soluble in water, whereupon the chylomicron fat delivery vehicles are set loose for distribution via the bloodstream.

                If all of this sounds to you like it is complicated and might take some time, then, you're absolutely correct. As a net result of the somewhat tortuous route that dietary lipids take to enter the blood stream, you won't see elevated plasma triacylglycerides for about an hour after ingestion, and even then, the peak plasma values are not seen until 3-5 hours after ingestion. As an aside, this goes a long way towards explaining the satiety effects of ketogenic diets that are heavily fat based ... you're still "eating" your meal 5 hours after you've had it!

                In terms of rates of nutrient absorption, carbohydrates are fastest, followed by amino acids which take a "detour" through the liver, and finally fats, which, as I mentioned, are processed via the lymphatic system.

                So, if I were in your shoes, I'd give it some time to determine whether I was still truly hungry, or rather exhibiting some temporal satiety lag due to the absorption kinetics of my meal. In plain speak, give it an hour or so before you decide that you are still hungry.

                -PK
                My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

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                • #9
                  excessive hunger can also be habitual, that is, brain based. The brain's reward center can become accustomed to a very full feeling and somewhat habituated to it.

                  It can easily be modified over 4 to 6 weeks where it won't be a problem anymore. The solution is to eat less and remain "hungry" for a bit until the brain receives satiation signals for real which are often 15 to 45 minutes after eating. Then the brain will adjust to this afte r awhile.

                  Ketogenic diets help because the body really isn't hungry in the same way anymore. That is, blood sugar doesn't drop causing strong hunger and it's easier to eat small meals.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pklopp View Post
                    You need to give post-prandial satiety some time.

                    Dietary fats are not absorbed into the blood stream as other nutrients are. This is principally due to the fact that fats are hydrophobic ( i.e. not soluble in water). Instead, fats are taken up by the lymphatic system and packaged into chylomicrons, which sequester the fats inside of a lipoprotein shell which is itself soluble in water, whereupon the chylomicron fat delivery vehicles are set loose for distribution via the bloodstream.

                    If all of this sounds to you like it is complicated and might take some time, then, you're absolutely correct. As a net result of the somewhat tortuous route that dietary lipids take to enter the blood stream, you won't see elevated plasma triacylglycerides for about an hour after ingestion, and even then, the peak plasma values are not seen until 3-5 hours after ingestion. As an aside, this goes a long way towards explaining the satiety effects of ketogenic diets that are heavily fat based ... you're still "eating" your meal 5 hours after you've had it!

                    In terms of rates of nutrient absorption, carbohydrates are fastest, followed by amino acids which take a "detour" through the liver, and finally fats, which, as I mentioned, are processed via the lymphatic system.

                    So, if I were in your shoes, I'd give it some time to determine whether I was still truly hungry, or rather exhibiting some temporal satiety lag due to the absorption kinetics of my meal. In plain speak, give it an hour or so before you decide that you are still hungry.

                    -PK
                    This is very useful, thank you for taking the time to post this.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dacec View Post
                      This is very useful, thank you for taking the time to post this.
                      You're welcome. Information wants to be free!

                      -PK
                      My blog : cogitoergoedo.com

                      Interested in Intermittent Fasting? This might help: part 1, part 2, part 3.

                      Comment

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