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Difference between White rice and potatoes?

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  • Difference between White rice and potatoes?

    Why would someone be ok with peeled white or sweet potato, but not with boiled white rice? There must be some difference in the composition of the starch that can cause irritation because i would have thought most of their antinutrients are inconsequential. Perhaps something in the rice protein but im guessing its the starch. Perhaps just the quantity of starch? Any ideas

  • #2
    Primal is theoretically anti-grain, and rice is a grain. Whole grains have more anti-nutrients than refined grains, but they also have more nutrients, so the other argument is that potatoes are more nutrient dense (which they are). I think another argument is they're too high glycemic, if you're into that sort of thing. I eat white rice.

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    • #3
      Hi, thanks, but that doesnt really explain why someone would be ok with potato and not rice?

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      • #4
        It doesn't? Those are the common arguments I see. A lot of people consider it a "safe starch".

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        • #5
          Tubers can have high potassium, carotene, and a little protein which makes them "first choice" carbs. White rice lacks these but contains nothing offensive either (after cooking). The only reason to avoid rice would be if one is doing VLC but otherwise I view potato and rice as interchangeable depending on the cuisine, e.g. roast beef and cabbage = potato; stir fry or curry = rice.

          Quantity is not really different. H2O fraction of baked potato is about 65%, boiled potato 80%, cooked rice 70%. I consider a serving to be 1 medium tuber or 4 tablespoons raw rice (+1/2c water).
          37//6'3"/185

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          • #6
            It depends on how much of a perfectionist you are, too.

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            • #7
              From what I've read from folks on the subject of "safe starches" the main thing you should be concerned about is does the starch have any toxins. From that standpoint, rice should be just as good a choice as peeled potatoes. Folks will argue that potatoes are a better choice because they have other nutrients compared to the nutrients in rice so while it may not be a "bad" choice if you are wanting to get some carbs in your diet something with more nutrient density might be more betterer.

              My take on the matter is that sushi doesn't usually come wrapped in mashed potatoes and sushi is ducking delicious.

              I don't see why one should be overly worried about rice or potatoes, why not enjoy both in reasonable quantities?
              Apathy is tyranny's greatest ally.

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              • #8
                Thanks again for all the answers. I cant see there being any major difference either, but for some reason i react to rice FAR more than i do potatoes. Thats the reason i asked. It must just be a sensitivity to starch and rice often has more per gram of weight so perhaps that is the reason.

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                • #9
                  Donnie, can you tell us what sort of reaction you have? I'm always interested to hear other people's experiences with their n=1 experimenting. (I think that's the best part about these forums, cause lord knows we can all argue about stuff ad naseum)
                  Apathy is tyranny's greatest ally.

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                  • #10
                    I have heard of rice intolerance. People who are intolerant to gluten are often intolerant to other grains, too. I'm okay with rice, but my intolerance to corn, oats, and buckwheat means I don't bother with most grains.

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                    • #11
                      Maybe it is a specific intolerance to grains. Im not sure what component of the white rice it would be if that were the case.

                      Im fine with meats and veges but they have to cooked properly otherwise i struggle to digest well. Im also fine with fruit but im afraid if i eat too much that will also cause me other problems. Dairy makes me SO sick! I react immediately to grains and nuts also. As mentioned, I even reacted to white rice although nowhere near as bad as whole grains or nuts. Potatoes i react less too if at all. I normally only eat potatoes post workout so sometimes the exercise pump and fatigue can cover the symptoms/discomfort if that makes sense. I might try a big potatoe tommorrow during the day just to see how i go. Perhaps it is just all starch's fault...

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                      • #12
                        Do both! In my post workout main meal for the day, I usually eat two white potatoes, half cup of rice and a green banana. Very good for recuperation after training...
                        Last edited by Gorbag; 05-04-2013, 01:26 PM.
                        "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident."

                        - Schopenhauer

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                        • #13
                          I don't eat American white potatoes because they are a nightshade and not of the potato family. If I want a non-primal starch I have some white rice, but not often.
                          "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                          • #14
                            All common potato's are from the nightshade family, as ar tomatos, peppers & eggplant.
                            Sweet potato's are the tuber of a rambling vine and are from a different family.

                            It may be the different types of lectins present which cause your differing symptoms or the other factor may be the difference between cellular (potato) & acellular (grains) carbs.
                            The cellular carbs are absorbed slower because the body still needs to break down cell walls before starch is fully released.
                            "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Omni View Post
                              All common potato's are from the nightshade family, as ar tomatos, peppers & eggplant.
                              Sweet potato's are the tuber of a rambling vine and are from a different family.

                              It may be the different types of lectins present which cause your differing symptoms or the other factor may be the difference between cellular (potato) & acellular (grains) carbs.
                              The cellular carbs are absorbed slower because the body still needs to break down cell walls before starch is fully released.
                              Im pretty sure its something to do with the composition of the starch, the rate and ease in which its digested, and the amount. It cant really be about anti-nutrients because they are pretty much cooked out; and it cant really be about the proteins because there is so little protein.

                              I read that cooking sweet potatoes alters the starch so in that perhaps lies the answer to my question. Id be really interested in more information about creating more accessible starch and minimizing the stress the body goes through to digest it. Perhaps i just need more healthy bacteria and amylase, but perhaps the CHOICE of starch and its preparation is more important. Perhaps sprouted and fermented grains like oats would actually be even more beneficial to me if it alters the starch (and addresses the proteins/antinutrients etc)

                              I just found this interesting article. Basically the same idea: ferment the starchy grains so they are more easily absorbed.
                              http://www.domesticsoul.com/2012/07/...ment-rice.html
                              Last edited by donnie86; 05-05-2013, 02:12 AM.

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