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  • Best steaming method

    Everyone on here has such creative ways of doing things and it is so helpful. I want to know what is the cheapest/easiest/best way to steam vegetables and/or seafood/fish. Broccoli has to taste better steamed. I bought some fish from the north (55th parallel) and they said to steam it and make poor man's lobster. I can google but I think the forum is my best choice. Throw in your favorite steamed recipe/meal if you want, I appreciate it.

  • #2
    I think it just depends on what type of equipment you are using. I have several pots that have steamer baskets that nest on top of the boiler section. These are what I use for steaming vegetables, though I would probably use some sort of rack that fit inside the pot if I didn't have such a basket.

    For steaming fish I would probably put the fish on a plate in the steamer basket or on a rack over the water.

    If you do a lot of steaming you might want to buy one of those big steamer pots like they use in Chinese restaurants. That way you can steam even large objects, and you can steam everything at once.

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    • #3
      the easiest easiest method is to put a little butter or oil in, and a bit of water, and the broccoli or whatever, and cover and boil. At the end, when the broc is tender, the water will mostly / entirely be gone. It's very simple and works for almost everything vegetable.

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      • #4
        Basic steamers are really cheap, I think mine is from a grocery store or Target. The tripod part sits in a saucepan and the ventilated dish slides up and down to fit.

        For vegetables the frozen microwave bags are usually just as good to me but I'm an uncivilized clod.
        37//6'3"/185

        My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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        • #5
          Originally posted by richard View Post
          the easiest easiest method is to put a little butter or oil in, and a bit of water, and the broccoli or whatever, and cover and boil. At the end, when the broc is tender, the water will mostly / entirely be gone. It's very simple and works for almost everything vegetable.
          But that's not "steaming" it's boiling. And a lot of the vegetable's nutrients are lost in water when boiled which is why steaming is very often a better option. And if you need your butter with your veggies then just drop a pat and smear it around with a knife just after you take the veggies out of the steamer.
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
            But that's not "steaming" it's boiling. And a lot of the vegetable's nutrients are lost in water when boiled which is why steaming is very often a better option. And if you need your butter with your veggies then just drop a pat and smear it around with a knife just after you take the veggies out of the steamer.
            No its not boiling because you only use a small amount of liquid

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            • #7
              Originally posted by richard View Post
              No its not boiling because you only use a small amount of liquid
              Any time food touches the liquid directly you still have nutrients that get lost into the water. This is why methods of steaming without having the food touch the water were traditionally (and quite frankly still most often) used today.

              Normally you can drink the liquid afterwards if you are intent on getting those lost nutrients, but with your method, the liquid completely boils away so that's not an option. Also, it seems to me that if you accidentally forgot about your food you'd have ruined it AND your pan.

              And trust me, people DO forget sometimes.
              "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                it seems to me that if you accidentally forgot about your food you'd have ruined it AND your pan.

                And trust me, people DO forget sometimes.
                I assure you, it is quite possible to walk away from a steamer until the pot is ruined and the vegetables thoroughly permeated with smoke.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                  Any time food touches the liquid directly you still have nutrients that get lost into the water. This is why methods of steaming without having the food touch the water were traditionally (and quite frankly still most often) used today.

                  Normally you can drink the liquid afterwards if you are intent on getting those lost nutrients, but with your method, the liquid completely boils away so that's not an option. Also, it seems to me that if you accidentally forgot about your food you'd have ruined it AND your pan.

                  And trust me, people DO forget sometimes.
                  I'll try one more time.

                  You put a little oil or butter in, and a small amount of water. Throw the food in. Yes, a little is in the water and gets boiled. But 99.9% of it is steamed. The water evaporates as steam and when you get good at this, the food will be done when the water is gone or pretty close. It is STEAMING not boiling. It is just a lot simpler than using a steamer, one less thing to wash and mess up. It works with just 1) food and 2) saucepan with lid or even skillet with lid.

                  It is NOT boiling other than a SMALL amount of food that contacts the water directly.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by richard View Post
                    I'll try one more time.

                    You put a little oil or butter in, and a small amount of water. Throw the food in. Yes, a little is in the water and gets boiled. But 99.9% of it is steamed. The water evaporates as steam and when you get good at this, the food will be done when the water is gone or pretty close. It is STEAMING not boiling. It is just a lot simpler than using a steamer, one less thing to wash and mess up. It works with just 1) food and 2) saucepan with lid or even skillet with lid.

                    It is NOT boiling other than a SMALL amount of food that contacts the water directly.
                    You'll note I didn't even call it "boiling" in my second post to you. I merely referred to other steaming methods (such as using a basket) which, while they may involve an extra step or dish to was, I think produces better results from my personal experience.

                    Just my opinion though.
                    "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Those old fashioned bamboo "hippie" steamers work great and are really versatile.
                      "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                      B*tch-lite

                      Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                        You'll note I didn't even call it "boiling" in my second post to you. I merely referred to other steaming methods (such as using a basket) which, while they may involve an extra step or dish to was, I think produces better results from my personal experience.

                        Just my opinion though.
                        yeah a basket produces better results but my method is faster and produces good results for very little effort. I find the tradeoff quite worth it Cooking is like that to me, I value speed and efficiency and am willing to trade off. In this case you really can't tell the difference with most vegetables steamed this way and using a basket.

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                        • #13
                          I use a rice cooker that has a steam setting and a steaming basket. this may not be the best method but it's super easy and requires no monitoring. my rice cooker is also how I make hardboiled eggs. although I suppose they are technically hard-steamed eggs!

                          Sent from my SCH-I535 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                          • #14
                            For vegetables, I stick them in a bowl or on a plate, cover it with a wet paper towel, and microwave it for 3 or 4 minutes. It's way easier than using a steamer, and with much less to clean up afterward.

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