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  • Any hikers/campers here?

    I like to go on 2-3 day backpacking trips in the woods every month. In the past i'd bring alot of dried foods where I can just add water. What do you guys/girls bring if you can't eat wheat?

  • #2
    Pemmican, LaraBars, Free The Animal Fat Bread, dried fruits, nuts, dark chocolate, home made jerky.

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    • #3
      For 2 - 5 days in the backcountry or mountains I like beef/bison jerky, GORP, hard cheese, dried fruit, chocolate, paleo granola, Larabars, etc. The only thing I miss is some kind of dehydrated primal instant soup. I would throw in a bunch of vegs and make a hot, hearty meal in one pot.

      It's a change from non-primal backpacking where I used to eat tons of bagels and noodle soups.

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      • #4
        I always bring fruit (bananas are my favorite and easiest to eat), last time I went hiking I brought leftover kabobs (I took the meat and veggies off the stick and put them in a tupperware) they surprisingly taste great when cold. I'll also bring a block of cheese, bag of sunflower seeds, plenty of water, and sometimes potato chips---you can find ones that aren't fried in nasty shit, great for some easy calories while hiking.
        Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

        Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
        Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
        Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
        F/23/5'9"

        26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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        • #5
          This is the exact thread I was looking for! I'm also going on a backpacking/camping trip and needed helpful advice!

          I'll have a cooler in the car to store meats to cook on the bbq back at camp. I heard one person about prepping meats with coconut oil/butter/ or other thing wrapped in foil and into the ice chest and then just throw them on the fire. BUT if you are not just camping near your car then I guess you have to take whats on you...

          Macaroon recipes Cook them, then wait till the next day (put in fridge) and they harden
          3/4 cup fine ground blanched almond flour (like Honeyville)
          1 1/2 cup “Let’s Do Organic" unsweetened shredded coconut*
          1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon raw honey or vegan alternative
          1/4 cup coconut oil, liquid
          2 teaspoons vanilla extract
          Pinch of unrefined sea salt
          take an ice cream scooper and pack in the "dough" tap them out on the cookie sheet.
          they seem too loose, BUT THEY AREN"T! after you bake them they are so soft you will think u did it wrong
          BUT YOU DIDN"T. wait for 3-4 hours tip firmer put in tupperware and store in fridge they get hard the next day.
          I spray the inside with coconut oil spray (they now carry at my TJ's!!!!)
          bake at 190 for 50 minutes ON PARCHMENT PAPER


          I've never heard of Larabars... Hard cheese stays good??

          anyone else have good camping ideas?

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          • #6
            I do several trips a year ranging btwn 5-10 days, and I have had great success with sausages(cooked or not). They have a pack life of about 4-5 days and can be a welcom treat at the end of a good hike. If you are going above tree line(no fires allowed), then cook them first at your base camp, then just store in a ziplock. Ive also taken pre cooked bacon, burgers, chicken(lasts 2-3 days if kept in the center of your pack), basically any meat. The weight can be a bit much at first, but well worth it in the long run.

            The other ideas given, such as jerky, pemmican, nuts, etc are good too. Hard cheeses work best for longer trips, and cans of sardines, oysters etc, are great for quick lunches. As for the soup part, I have taken a bag of spices/soup base that consists of salt, pepper, garlic powder, cumin, oregono(or whatever you prefer) then add it to hot water. You can buy dehydrated veggies at whole foods, New Seasons, Trader Joes, etc...And just add em in for a tasty soup. Good luck, and enjoy
            Free your mind, and your Grok will follow!

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            • #7
              I have a Ronco (el super cheapo) dehydrator. I dehydrate the following:

              - Kale or other leafy green
              - Raw carrots
              - Cooked, mashed rutabaga, sweet potatoes, yams, kumara
              - Any other veggie that looks like it'll work
              - Kalamata and green olives
              - Slow-cooked pork tenderloin pulled apart
              - Cooked chicken breast cut in chunks (it doesn't rehydrate better than hard and chewy but I like that)

              I also make the following:
              - Beef pemmican (dried beef pulverized in a blender with beef tallow added and sometimes dried fruit)
              - Coconut pemmican (shredded coconut with beef tallow or possibly coconut butter)

              For a meal I fill a plastic peanut butter jar (can use a ziploc or other container) with some of the starchy and non-starchy veggies, olives and meat filled almost to the top. Add water. Soak until the next meal. At breakfast you soak lunch. At lunch you soak dinner. I eat this cold with olive oil added. If I bring a stove, I melt one of the pemmicans in it. Oh man, so good.

              I brought real Japanese miso paste once for seasoning and it was pretty good. Sometimes I season with dehydrated Miso Cup. But even with no seasoning it's pretty good. Sometimes the olives have some nice spices.

              Breakfast is usually pemmican with the fruit in it and chocolate espresso beans.

              I also bring some dried fruit and nuts. Don't need much.
              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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              • #8
                It depends on the season for me. I'll take hard boiled eggs, roast chicken thighs, olives, tomatoes, radishes, nuts, cheese, bananas, dried fruit (Dates, yummy!), dark chocolate and some occasional boil in the bag rations like our UK military Lancashire Hotpot. For a hot drink I take Mango & Lychee green tea bags. When I'm camping I want minimum fuss and washing up so I tend not to take fresh sausages, bacon etc.

                Mind you, there ares ome great ideas from others here that I'm going to use in future too.
                Why use a sledge hammer to crack a nut when a steam roller is even more effective, and, is fun to drive.

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                • #9
                  I usually bring:
                  - kelp noodles with dairy free pesto
                  - macaroons
                  - trail mix
                  - paleo granola (mixed with coconut milk powder yumm)
                  - dehydrated veggie/fruit chips not sweet dried kind
                  - coffee...lots
                  - kale chips
                  - pulled pork/chicken/beef wrapped in nori
                  - Sweet potatos and sweet potato chips

                  So many delicious combos! Enjoy the trail!

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                  • #10
                    I also forgot to include dry salami, pepperoni, and almond butter.

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                    • #11
                      Parmesan and sharp cheddar I have had no problems with, however, I am from a climate where 50 degree F is considered great hiking weather. If you're going somewhere hot, I'd definitely dehydrate the stuff first.

                      I also just thought of bacon: Why not?
                      Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

                      Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
                      Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
                      Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
                      F/23/5'9"

                      26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I like my 50L fridge in the fourby.

                        That way I can take steak, eggs, bacon and veggies. And lots of nuts and red wine.

                        If you dehydrate stuff, how on earth do you carry enough water? 5 litres a day per person gets jolly heavy, especially when you haven't used it all.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bifcus View Post
                          If you dehydrate stuff, how on earth do you carry enough water? 5 litres a day per person gets jolly heavy, especially when you haven't used it all.
                          You don't. That is, in most cases, you find a stream or spring and use some type of purification method to make the water drinkable (free of parasites and other disease-causing bugs).

                          Thanks everyone for the ideas. I am planning to do a 8-9 day section hike this June on the Appalachian trail. Some suggestions for cooler weather will not work for me. I plan to bring pemmican, but I am somewhat worried even about that. It's going to be in the 90s more than likely, so the tallow will probably start melting during the hottest parts of the day. Any tips regarding that?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Bifcus View Post
                            I like my 50L fridge in the fourby.

                            That way I can take steak, eggs, bacon and veggies. And lots of nuts and red wine.

                            If you dehydrate stuff, how on earth do you carry enough water? 5 litres a day per person gets jolly heavy, especially when you haven't used it all.
                            I only ever carry that much water when water is 20 or more miles apart or more than a day apart. Otherwise I get water from springs, creeks, lakes, rivers, and cattle troughs. Pretty much the same sources as that stuff that comes out of your faucet.

                            Getting water from nature is a holy experience. Nobody ever felt love for a faucet.

                            As for the pemmican, it works great. I use it out here in Southern California. I make it myself. That US Wellness stuff melts. I have used the US Wellness stuff and it'll last for a few days. I wrap it in the center of my sleeping bag. I don't stuff my sleeping bag into a stuff sack though, I just stuff it into the bottom of my pack, leave a little bit loose, set my pemmican on the bag, then stuff the loose bit over it. Eat the pemmican in the first couple of days. If I bring my own, that stuff has sat on a shelf in my kitchen for 6 months and it is still good.

                            One of the most tastiest meals you can make is to bring dehydrated starchy stuff (I like yams or sweet potatoes) and vegetables. Cook this up in your pot (with water of course) and melt in some pemmican. Oh man. So delicious and satisfying.
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My experience is more from a car camping(historical re-enactment camping) side of things and having to make food for five hungry people. What we pack depends partly on how hot or cold the weather is. I'm another Washingtonian so 50 degrees and camping is a good day. In cold weather, hot drinks and lots of them. Coffee, tea and for indulgence hot spiced cider. In hot weather, water, sun tea, and shrubs(a lemon, vinegar ginger 'ade'-it's historical. We do the gorp thing, hard cheeses and hard sausage. I have a dehydrator so all manner of fruit, vegie and meat go in. If it is going to get used fast I will dehydrate a thick stew to be rehydrated and simmered. I haven't tried dehydrating mashed garlic sweet potatoes yet, but it is on my list. For things like root vegies I find they rehydrate faster if they have been cooked before dehydrating. We will simmer a dried fruit compote in the morning with a pinch of cinnamon. If it is cooler we will have cream cheese in a cooler along with fresh eggs. Nut butters mixed with dried fruit disappear. Seasonings whether added before you leave to ziplock baggies of food or at camp are a must if you want people to actually eat. I dehydrate fruit leathers and vegetable puree like squash and pumpkin for 'mashed' veggie. Yogurt leather goes over big. I find greens the hardest to do and I'm still experimenting there. Because we have a little one and two teens we have a lot of tidbit munchies. I'm always experimenting to find new and tasty things.

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