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I think my 12 year old may be diabetic...

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  • #16
    Originally posted by tomi View Post
    Sugar in general - fruit sugars included can effect kids with ADHD - so I suggest cutting back a bit on the fruit - or try to get him to eat berries instead of the higher sugar fruits.

    Its not terrible to have a blood glucose level of 150 or higher right after eating - but after 2 hours it should normalize back to around 100. If diabetes is a real concern then by all means try to get the endo to see him sooner than July. Call the office and explain the circumstances and ask to be put on a wait list for the first available. Another option is to not wait for pediatric endo - a regular endo can diagnose and treat a child also. Type 1 diabetes can start at anytime during the growing years, and even into the 20's, although that is pretty uncommon. (I work at an endo office). But, before getting yourself all worked up about it at least do some research and find out what you should be watching for.

    Good luck - I hope it turns out to NOT be diabetes, but even if it is, with the right treatment and vigilance it can be an easily managed disease.
    Thank you for the advice abt endos. We should get his results next week, then we'll go from there.

    I am trying to teach him to make better choices about fruit and food in general. It's a process, and something I'll be modeling for him and my other son.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
      Yeah your going to have to get some testing done. You really do have to determine if this is type 1, type 2, or prediabetic tendancies and work with it accordingly.

      Unfortunately I disagree with "diabetes is just a word"....particularly in the case of type 1 instances. Its one medical diagnosis that is quite legit. It is not just a set of symptoms that we slap a word on like so many other disorders.

      So focus on the blood sugar issue and get the proper testing done. Post again when you get those results. I wish you and your son the best.

      And to everyone... I don't know if ADHD meds monkey with blood sugar, but that is something to look into. BUT, you can develop type 1 diabetes as an adolescent and these individuals are frequently quite skinny and do not fit the criteria for "metabolic syndrome" which is a completely different animal. Doesn't necessarily mean that I think OP's son has this issue, but he does need some testing....
      Thanks for your post. We had his blood drawn this past Fri so we should know something this week. I will look into the question of whether ADHD meds mess with blood sugar.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by serenity View Post
        Does he work out or play sports? Physical activity helps reduce ADHD symptoms as well. Incidentally, it also helps with diabetes.

        And I agree with the rebellion thing. I, too, don't believe in overly restrictive parenting styles. My mom was like that (not about food, but she would never let me go out with friends) so I ran away from home when I was in the 7th grade. Yup. 7th grade. Then when I got older, I just ignored her and would stay out all night and not even bother calling her. Had she been more reasonable, I probably wouldn't have felt compelled to take such drastic measures.
        He is very active, and goes outside to ride bikes or play basketball for at least a couple hours a day.

        I would caution those of you who have never experienced or parented a child with severe ADHD to be careful with your judgements about strict parenting. This is a real disability with real life consequences for not only the child, but the family as well. I hear what you are saying, but I have to temper that with part of my role as a parent being to figure out where his deficits are and to educate him appropriately on how to overcome them and be successful in this world. It's a daunting task, but one I take very very seriously.
        Last edited by jodeyh; 04-20-2013, 03:14 PM.

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        • #19
          The symptoms of juvenile diabetes are pretty noticeable. Not by blood tests but by obvious things like unquenchable thirst, weight loss despite being hungry and eating a lot, fatigue and other things. When I was in high school way back when, a girl in my class developed diabetes. Before she knew she had it, she was the skinniest thing and always carried a bottle of water, which back then was a strange thing to do. You should let a doctor diagnose it.

          By the way, stuff like ADHD and diabetes are sometimes related to wheat sensitivities. The diabetes because it's an autoimmune condition and wheat sensitivities can make the body prone to autoimmune problems.
          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by magicmerl rl View Post
            Why is he on ADHD meds?

            I'm pretty sure that my brother would have been diagnosed as ADHD if he'd been a kid today, but he never had the meds and is fine today.

            I'm also pretty sure that he's not a diabetic either from what you have posted (a tiny voice inside me suggests that the ADHD meds might be causing some of the 'symptoms' of other conditions). What other symptoms of metabolic syndrome is he exhibiting?
            He's on meds because he, unfortunately, is a kid who actually needs them. I'm not going to get into our reasons for medicating, but it was not done lightly. It's very possible that there is nothing metabolic wrong, but being tired all the time and his blood sugar is enough for me to at least do some blood work to assess the situation. You bring up an excellent point abt the meds causing other issues or at least giving the appearance of issues and I will definitely look into it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by 2ndChance View Post
              Just be careful... or one day your kid will rebel and eat loads of junk food and tell people how his crazy health-obsessed mom wouldn't stop finger pricking him (I'm not trying to be mean, that's just reality)... I ate much, much worse than your kid is eating for 18 years of my life--if there was diabetes to be had I'm sure I had it--but my parents never tried to restrict my eating and I think that's why I am where I am now, I was allowed to "ride out" my junk food cravings until I decided for myself that my health mattered to me. I understand your worry but I think you need to relax. "Diabetes" is just a word--don't let some doctor start pumping your 12 y.o. with insulin, just focus on setting a good example for your kids and let them find their own way... in the long run that will ensure the healthiest results for them more than you restricting them from eating wheat, which will probably only make them want to eat it to spite you once the teenage years hit... You don't want to turn your kid into a hypochondriac! IMO the culprit here might be the ADHD "medication"...I am very skeptical of things like that, but only you really understand your own situation, but it might be worth looking into alternative remedies, for all you know some side effect of the ADHD meds is high blood glucose and you're telling your kid not to eat fruit for no reason...

              Maybe get him an instrument? Music has helped me improve my attention span a lot, and given me an outlet for my energy..
              I'm very careful abt meds with my family. I don't believe in medicating for the hell of it. I just want to know if there is something I need to be aware of.

              To be clear, I didn't tell him not to eat fruit, I told him to reduce the number of apples he eats. I think 6 apples a day is ridiculous for anyone to eat! Just the amt of money I spend in fruit....

              As far as restricting food, I believe in showing my kids what a healthy diet and lifestyle look like. If that sounds strict, so be it. It's not as though they don't get sugar (in the former of maple sugar, syrup of honey), or even pizza or wheat, it's that they don't get to sit down and eat a bag of mom's or sour patch kids on a daily basis. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. At all. If they load up on junk food when they can buy it themselves or are out of my house, that's on them. My role is to teach them and show them what I believe to be a healthy life style. After that, they make their own decisions.

              Thank you for telling me your opinion. It's good to hear opposing thoughts. :-)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                The symptoms of juvenile diabetes are pretty noticeable. Not by blood tests but by obvious things like unquenchable thirst, weight loss despite being hungry and eating a load , fatigue and other things. When I was in high school way back when, a girl in my class developed diabetes. Before she knew she had it, she was the skinniest thing and always carried a bottle of water, which back then was a strange thing to do. You should let a doctor diagnose it.

                By the way, stuff like ADHD and diabetes are sometimes related to wheat sensitivities. The diabetes because it's an autoimmune condition and wheat sensitivities can make the body prone to autoimmune problems.
                Def going to let doc dx.

                When he was first looking like he had ADHD, which was around age 4,i did an elimination diet with him. It showed us that food has a very definite effect on his behavior, and wheat was one that did have a small effect on it. We pretty much did everything we could behavior wise, diet and exercise wise to keep him off the meds. That being said, knowing what I know now about grains and their detrimental effect on the body, I am definitely going to reexamine that link.
                Last edited by jodeyh; 04-20-2013, 06:38 PM.

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                • #23
                  How about giving him other choices for snacks? Nuts, yogurt or cheese would not require any preparation and would give him some protein and fat. I would believe that eating just fruit would make him hungrier, I see that often with my kids and they are 2 and 5. Anytime they have a snack I require some sort of protein with it so they don't return to me 30-60 minutes later for more food.

                  Also, kiwi is a tropical fruit and so it can have a huge impact on blood sugar.

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                  • #24
                    I did not know that about kiwi. He LOVES them.

                    I haven't bought yogurt for a while because all the kinds he likes have tons of sugar in them. He will eat cheese and turkey roll ups, so cheese is definitely something he'll do.

                    I like the idea of protein/fat with carbs for snacks.

                    His newest thing is celery with almond butter on it.

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                    • #25
                      I am very glad to read you have made an appointment with a pediatric endocrinologist. Were you referred by your primary care physician? Or did you call yourself? I am asking, because if your son's pediatrician was highly concerned about diabetes, they would have called and gotten him seen sooner.

                      I think that a random blood sugar of over 200 is considered probably for diabetes for kids. Fasting blood sugars must be taken twice and must follow a full 8 hour fast.

                      His A1C level suggests "pre-diabetes" in adults, but I think there has been some controversy as to the accuracy of A1C levels in children, so it may not be as bad for him. If you can, ask them to look for diabetes autoantibodies when they draw his blood next.

                      I am sure you know this, but if he becomes symptomatic at all please don't wait for an appointment with a specialist. Just get him to the ER or at least your primary care doc.

                      Best of luck.
                      Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                      http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                      • #26
                        I'm glad you're going to see a pediatric endo, but wasn't your pediatrician concerned about the blood glucose on those earlier tests? If not, did he/she explain why? I can understand if the interaction with your child's meds can cause BS numbers to be off, but surely the doctor discussed these results with you?

                        In any case, the endo should have some answers. One thing I DO know from two friends who have had children diagnosed with Type 1 at an early age (6 and 7 respectively). Both were told that the child has to be immediately educated to take control of his/her own diet--because it's literally a matter of life and death. Parents need to allow the child to completely manage meds and diet (providing needed support, of course)--otherwise the natural rebellion of children, especially in adolescence can cause incredible complications.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jodeyh View Post
                          I did not know that about kiwi. He LOVES them.

                          I haven't bought yogurt for a while because all the kinds he likes have tons of sugar in them. He will eat cheese and turkey roll ups, so cheese is definitely something he'll do.

                          I like the idea of protein/fat with carbs for snacks.

                          His newest thing is celery with almond butter on it.
                          Try buying plain yogurt and letting him mix in fruit or even dip fruit in it. At least it would be adding protein/fat onto the fruit.

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                          • #28
                            My seventeen year old daughter has Type One Diabetes. She was eleven when she was diagnosed and there was very little warning that something was wrong. After the diagnosis I did remember noticing that she was drinking an awful lot of water, but she was every athletic, active and it was summer. If your child is indeed diabetic and it seems like that may be the case, you are lucky to have a warning. We didn't have a catastrophic occurrence and you won't either. One of the most annoying policies that our "modern" endocrinologists employ, is the "you can eat anything" policy and just balance it with more insulin. My daughter is slowly moving more and more towards a lower carb diet with very good success. I don't think that the VLC diets that many employ here is a great idea for a young person, diabetic or not. But something in the "Zone" ratios seems easy, healthy and effective.

                            Hopefully your child is not diabetic and the high A1C is due to some other factor. Good luck and take care.
                            Some of you may die, but that is a risk I'm willing to take.

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                            • #29
                              Blood work is back, and it's weird.

                              This was a fasting test.

                              Glucose 91
                              A1C 5.6 (borderline)
                              Total Cholesterol 213 (<169)
                              HDL 61 (>39)
                              LDL 141 (<109)
                              VLDL 11 (5-40)
                              Trig 54
                              T4, free 1.06 (.93-1.60)
                              TSH 1.520 (.450-4.500)
                              T3, free 3.8 (2.3-5)
                              C peptide 1.8 (1.1-4.4)
                              CRP .3 (0-4.9)

                              EDIT: According to http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread4723.html, his ratios are good. Total/HDL=3.4918 (<5); Trig/HDL=.8852 (<2); LDL/HDL=2.311 (<4.3).

                              I don't know what to make of these results. Do they indicate that he is at the beginning of some metabolic issues? Or no issues? Why are his total-c and LDL elevated but trigs aren't? How does A1C play into it?

                              The doctor suggests we see a nutritionist. I told the nurse no, we wouldn't do that because we eat a specific diet. I'd rather see a pediatric endo. The nutritionist is just going to tell me a whole bunch of bullshit about grains, etc. I don't want to waste my time...unless I can find a nutritionist with a paleo/primal outlook. The nurse is going to put back a note about the endo. It doesn't really matter if he agrees...the only thing they can do for me is move the appt up. I don't need a referral from him.
                              Last edited by jodeyh; 04-23-2013, 06:54 AM.

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                              • #30
                                Did the doctor tell you that an A1C of 5.6 is 'borderline'?

                                I ask because diabetes is in my family (all my siblings have it), and my endo checks me regularly when he does my thyroid levels (I'm hypo). My A1C is typically 5.2-5.6--and my endo says that's 'excellent.' He says that above 6.0 is borderline, and although 5.6 may seem close, my A1C has remained in the 5's for several years. The variations in a non-diabetic are typically small.

                                I agree with you about seeing a nutritionist--waste of time in my experience. I'd opt for the pediatric endo to deal with your concerns.

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