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How does my thyroid play into weight loss stall, cholesterol, etc?

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  • #16
    Anyone?

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    • #17
      I have Hashi's but am well controlled, taking both T4 (Levoxyl) and T3 (Cytomel). My CRP is typically 0.1 or 0.2 when tested--despite the fact that I have rather severe osteoarthritis. So I think you should look into that very high CRP.

      Also, you mention that your goiter is growing. My nodules all stopped growing when I was optimally medicated. My endo does a sonogram annually to check because if they grow, it can be a serious problem. Isn't your doctor concerned?

      If your very low T3 indicates that you're having conversion problems, you need to get Rx'd T3 because that's the hormone that's critical--it controls metabolism and how we feel. When my T3 'tanked,' I was so fatigued that I couldn't get through a day without a 3-hour nap!

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      • #18
        I'm just not sure how to get diagnosed. I talked to my GP yesterday (just b/c I had a physical and was there) and she said "that the most important value out of the thyroid numbers was the TSH." And that the T4 to T3 conversion doesn't really matter. I'm sitting there thinking to myself "WTF?"

        I'm going to give my endo, who I see next week, one more chance. I've seen him for years and I thought he knew what he was doing, but now I'm not so sure. Last year I complained about being cold all the time and my hair falling out, and he looked at my thyroid values and said it wasn't my thyroid. Now I have to wonder if he should have been digging a little further to see about conversion rates. This is stuff I Had no idea about when I saw him last. And he doesn't seem inclined to do more than he has to...

        My goiter...I have multi-nodular goiter. It has grown significantly over the past few years, and the endo has treated it with Levoxyl. I've gone up and down over the years, but currently I'm taking 200 mcg M-S and 2 pills on Sunday. The meds have made the goiter stop growing and maybe even shrink a little, but it's been years since I've been able to run my hand over my neck and not feel a big lump. I started supplementing with iodine in Dec '12 and my thyroid shrunk to smaller than anytime since I've been on Levoxyl. I started at 300mcg/day and went up to 600mcg/day when I had to get a different supplement (because they didn't sell the one I was using anymore). At that time, my endo had done a test and said that I did not have Hashi's, so supplementing with iodine was "fine, and wouldn't matter."

        I've had numerous ultrasounds on my thyroid, none of which have shown anything new or significant. So, no, I guess he isn't concerned.

        How does one get dx'd with T3 issues? I'm going to have to ask direct questions, so the more info I have with me, the better, I guess.

        I don't find that I'm all that tired...just cold and hair falling out.

        I feel like fixing my thyroid is key to getting the rest of me fixed...just have to get the endo on board!

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        • #19
          You'd probably have to find another doctor to get diagnosed with "T3 issues" because any doctor who tells you that you 'don't have Hashi's' based on lab tests is suspect.

          My story--I was diagnosed simply as hypothyroid and tested regularly for about 5 years. No one mentioned Hashi's. But when I had a biopsy of one of my nodules, the report came back with the diagnosis of Hashi's (based on analysis of the tissue and fluid extracted). My endo said that he was glad to see that because he'd long suspected that I had Hashi's, but on my labs, the antibody level was never high enough for a diagnosis.

          I since learned that false negatives for Hashi's are common on blood tests because unless the thryoid is being actively attacked at the time the blood is drawn, the antibody level will be too low. My endo never told me I didn't have Hashi's because he knew that the lab tests are not reliable.

          Most doctors don't worry about this because the treatment is not for Hashi's but for hypothyroid. However, from the patient's perspective, this is important to know because many Hashi's people are either celiac or gluten intolerant (I am the latter).

          In addition, according to my endo, conversion problems are common with Hashi's, and it's important to track the T3 level--although my conversion problems happened practically overnight and very dramatically. Fortunately, I was scheduled for a regular check up within 2 weeks, so the problems was identified fairly quickly.

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          • #20
            My understanding-- good conversion is indicated when both FT4 and FT3 are in approximately the same place in their respective ranges.. Meaning if both frees are at midpoint of their ranges then conversion is good. Midpoint of your FT4 is 129.5(130). Midpoint of your FT3 is 3.2.

            You are above midpoint for FT4 and barely in range for FT3. This suggests conversion problems.

            I would suggest first trying to help conversion without meds. I think I listed some things earlier. If I didn't, let me know and I will. If conversion is still subpar after doing things on the list then approaching your doctor about T3 meds is the next step.

            To approach your doctor, research T4 to T3 conversion so that you understand it and then go in prepared to get him/her to allow you to try something with both T4 and T3 in it like Armour or Naturethroid or to add a T3 med (Cytomel) to your Levoxyl.

            You might want to also research the meds too--Armour, Naturethyroid, cytomel. Combo meds tend to have a higher T4 to T3 ratio than the human thyroid does.

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            • #21
              Conversion issues and the like are not usually diagnosed by your standard doctor of medicine. It's the sort of thing that holistic and functional medicine practitioners look at. Reason being the medical solution is more T4....for everything. So if the diagnosis doesn't change the prescription why do further testing or be more specific about your diagnosis?

              Here is one good book on it if your interested Why Do I Still Have Thyroid Symptoms? When My Lab Tests Are Normal: Datis Kharrazian: 9780985690403: Amazon.com: Books

              Various types of health practitioners practice in this fashion. It really depends what doctor you are comfortable with. There is a nurse practitioner, one medical doctor, and two chiropractors in my area that do functional medicine. You may have to pay out of pocket for some of the services though. Good luck.

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              • #22
                I take 250mcg of selenium /day. I've been taking it since right t after my blood work in December. I know I used to be anemic, but I'm not anymore. I take iron daily and more during my period bc it is very heavy, tho since going primal it has normalized some. It's regular now. I've never had ferritin levels checked, but I will ask endo if he'll do it.

                Do you think the inflammation could be my thyroid because of the iodine? I've stopped taking it and will have crp tested again in a couple weeks.

                I'm not sure what to do about carbs. I feel good at the level I'm at, but weight loss is currently a problem.

                So knowing that, what are opinions of adding t3?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by jodeyh View Post
                  I take 250mcg of selenium /day. I've been taking it since right t after my blood work in December. I know I used to be anemic, but I'm not anymore. I take iron daily and more during my period bc it is very heavy, tho since going primal it has normalized some. It's regular now. I've never had ferritin levels checked, but I will ask endo if he'll do it.

                  Do you think the inflammation could be my thyroid because of the iodine? I've stopped taking it and will have crp tested again in a couple weeks.

                  I'm not sure what to do about carbs. I feel good at the level I'm at, but weight loss is currently a problem.

                  So knowing that, what are opinions of adding t3?
                  Is this the first time you had C-Reactive Protein tested? I ask because you have a goiter and they can involve inflammation. Many other things can cause inflammation, so it would be hard to know if the goiter, the iodine or something else is causing the high CRP.

                  Mine was high (5) and my endo dismissed it as a genetic anomaly. Turns out I had bone on bone arthritis in my knee, which was very inflamed. The endo dismissed the knee pain because of my weight.

                  How many grams of carbs are you eating on a daily basis?

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                  • #24
                    I really thought I'd had one done prior, but I can't find the results. I'm going to keep looking, though.

                    Right now I'm eating at least 75g of carbs a day.

                    And I just realized something...my sleep, since I stopped the iodine, sucks. I'm FREEZING at night (more than usual) and it's making my sleep suffer. I already sleep in long sleeve nightgown with flannel sheets, a comforter and an additional blanket.

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                    • #25
                      I also just noticed another test result back from 5/21/12 that shows my TPO Ab at 42. High end of range is 34. So that indicates my thyroid is under attack, right?

                      Another result back from 6/14/11 shows that I did have a serum ferritin done and it was 178 (13-150), so high. I also had a test for Sedimentation Rate-Westergen and my result was 49 (0-39). I remember my GP thought there was a chance I had lupus. Isn't that another autoimmune? Turns out I didn't; she did a retest a few months later and the results were well within normal.

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