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kid loves bread. alternatives?

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  • #16
    There's a gluten free bread made with rice flour Called Ener-G it's pretty good and I don't remember there being any scary ingredients.

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    • #17
      I like to make sandwiches this way. You take a bell pepper and slice it in half and fill it with meat, veggies and cheese.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TCates190 View Post
        There's a gluten free bread made with rice flour Called Ener-G it's pretty good and I don't remember there being any scary ingredients.
        OMG, that's nasty stuff. The first time I tried a slice I was like, this would be okay toasted with butter. The next time I tried it I toasted it and buttered it and said, this would be okay toasted and buttered, with cream cheese and raspberry jam. The next time I tried it I toasted it, buttered it, spread on cream cheese and raspberry jam. I threw away the loaf.

        On the rare occasions we want bread we use Udi's bread.

        I think the issue is that the child is not eating a variety of healthy foods. Rather she is eating mostly bread.

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        • #19
          Potato loaf.
          Make mashed potato. Season. Add 1 heaped tsp baking soda, 1 heaped tsp bicarb and 1.5tsp lemon juice (lemon near the end!) for every 1-2.5kg of bread. Stir in very well, until you see bubbles. Butter-up a tin. Pour the mix in. (It has to be pour-able, not solid! Otherwise it may not rise much.) Leave to rest. Bake at 180-220 degrees until you can insert a knife that comes out clean (or, if you have a temperature-probe, until it hits 90 degrees). I'd say 35min on average for a 1kg loaf, but different tins and different ovens will produce different results, so keep an eye on it!

          Makes a lovely loaf. Unsure whether it's very toast-able, mind...

          PS: The best part is, you can blend in other veggies, to add vitamins and stuff!
          Last edited by Kochin; 03-31-2013, 09:21 AM.
          --
          Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

          --
          I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
          I'd apologize, but...

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          • #20
            Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
            The child eats little but bread. When she is hungry, she demands bread and refuses anything else.

            Constipation can be a symptom of celiac, though it is unlikely that this is the case. However, an intolerance hasn't been ruled out by anything in the original post.



            Again, the child eats little or nothing but bread. You are recommending that hkgirl sacrifice her child's health because the family prefers to feed her nothing but bread. I don't think keeping peace with the family is worth abandoning the idea of sane nutrition.



            It doesn't sound like anybody's being difficult at all about the fact that she wants to eat nothing but bread. It sounds like she is being permitted to choose to eat only bread. In fact, she's learned that if she demands a certain food, adults will provide it for her as much whenever and as much as she wants. This will, if anything, be harder to unlearn later.
            You must know this child personally to make such assumptions. Otherwise you sound rather ridiculous.

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            • #21
              I gotta recommend Ezekiel bread as a "transitioning away from bread" bread. It's organic, the grains are sprouted, no weird ingredients. There's a few different kinds. But I'm thinking of some things that are tastier than bread--stir fried broccoli with garlic and salt, for example--that, if your family is willing to prepare them (I would guess that part of giving in to the request for bread is that it's damn easy to prepare, either toast it or eat straight out of the bag, what's easier than that) might satisfy your daughter's salt-and-starch tooth.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Zach View Post
                Ugh to the max! How about because bread tastes good? If you want to be a neurotic parent who starts their child off with a great big food complex then go ahead and eliminate all grains. Or you can except that bread is a part of our culture and your kid is going to eat it whether you have a food phobia or not.
                Actually she is very reasonable. Parents are better capable of making food choices than are children. Being a responsible parent and looking at bread as less than desirable when alternatives are available is not an example of neurosis.

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                • #23
                  Maybe try these once in awhile when she asks for bread?

                  Easy Brazilian Cheese Bread (Po de Queijo) Recipe | Simply Recipes
                  Quick Brazilian Cheese Rolls {Pao de Queijo} | Our Best Bites

                  They're really easy to make - more of a quick bread than a bread, and they're delicious. If she likes them, you might be able to transition her away from wheat without a lot of arguing.
                  "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                  B*tch-lite

                  Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                    Again, the child eats little or nothing but bread. You are recommending that hkgirl sacrifice her child's health because the family prefers to feed her nothing but bread. I don't think keeping peace with the family is worth abandoning the idea of sane nutrition.
                    We clearly come from very different viewpoints about kids and food and I have no illusions about being able to convince you otherwise : )

                    However, I just want to point out that the OP also stated: "She does eat other foods, mostly white rice, veggies, eat (sic), fish whenever we eat them."

                    And with respect to keeping peace with the family--this child is being cared for on a regular basis by other family members. Given that they are not primal, it barely seems reasonable for a child to be expected to happily wrap her turkey around a carrot while other people are eating much-coveted sandwiches on bread. It is not the same situation as having her at home surrounded by only primal food and her primal family. I am not talking so much about "keeping peace" as in avoiding arguments as I am about keeping people--caregivers and children--in a situation where they can have happy interactions as much as possible, because I think happiness is a good thing.

                    Even if the child *did* eat little or nothing but bread, it wouldn't concern me that much. Many toddlers have done the same or worse and they grow out of it and become perfectly normal eaters--especially if they have *not* also learned that food is a battleground issue. My son's diet at about age four centered around ice cream sandwiches, but he eats a perfectly reasonable diet these days, at 11, including turning down cakes and candies because he knows he feels better when he eats healthier foods.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by SuBee View Post
                      Even if the child *did* eat little or nothing but bread, it wouldn't concern me that much. Many toddlers have done the same or worse and they grow out of it and become perfectly normal eaters--especially if they have *not* also learned that food is a battleground issue.
                      It's not so much that toddlers grow out of being picky later if you indulge them long enough. They never get picky in the first place if you don't cater to them by providing a special diet, because they're kids, and kids need this. That's a very modern American way of viewing children's eating, that kids will grow up to enjoy a variety of food, but while they are kids it's natural for them to survive on, oh, sugar water and fried fake chicken fingers.

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                      • #26
                        if it's actually the krap bread (margarine? blech) that causes the child to be constipated, i should think that's a no-brainer of a conversation to have with care-givers, whether or not you share dna. "please don't feed my daughter "x", it makes her sick."

                        if she broke out in hives from nuts would they keep feeding them to her? or would that be ok for the sake of family harmony? what kind of weird lesson is this for a kid? eat this, even though it makes you sick?
                        Last edited by noodletoy; 03-31-2013, 06:56 PM.
                        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                        Ernest Hemingway

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by 2ndChance View Post
                          I gotta recommend Ezekiel bread as a "transitioning away from bread" bread. It's organic, the grains are sprouted, no weird ingredients. There's a few different kinds. But I'm thinking of some things that are tastier than bread--stir fried broccoli with garlic and salt, for example--that, if your family is willing to prepare them (I would guess that part of giving in to the request for bread is that it's damn easy to prepare, either toast it or eat straight out of the bag, what's easier than that) might satisfy your daughter's salt-and-starch tooth.
                          Yes, bread is just easy because it's always on the countertop. My daughter knows where it is. She likes chicken and carrots these days, but she doesn't ask for those, as they're only prepared around mealtimes.

                          I wondered previously whether 'bread' was just her way of saying 'i'm hungry'. It isn't-- she wants bread. She says 'rice' when she's hungry.

                          We don't live in the US, and sprouted or sourdough is a bit difficult to find.

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                          • #28
                            French fries. French fries are a great bread substitute. Bake them or fry them crispy. Good french fries should have kids totally forgetting about bread. And they're the cheapest, easiest things to make!
                            Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by tresa
                              For the OP.

                              If you and your daughter are staying with family, the priority is really harmony with the people whose house you are sharing.

                              When you are home, say no to bread. If you feel the family would be receptive, ask them to at least stop giving slices as a snack food, but sandwiches are ok. It will seem like a more reasonable request to your non-paleo family than saying no bread at all.

                              In the future when you are back on your own, you can simply not stock your pantry with bread. She'll adjust
                              I am grateful for my family's help in taking care of my daughter, and don't want to annoy them. They consider bread healthy, so think I'm a bit unreasonable when I ask them to replace it with rice or fruits (bread is just easier...)

                              I don't want my daughter to develop any food complexes. I have enough of that and do not wish that for her.

                              I am also in the process of cutting down her breastfeeding frequency, so I want her to get nutritious food. She used to eat more nutrient-dense foods, but these days, bread seems to be taking over.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                                if it's actually the krap bread (margarine? blech) that causes the child to be constipated, i should think that's a no-brainer of a conversation to have with care-givers, whether or not you share dna. "please don't feed my daughter "x", it makes her sick."

                                if she broke out in hives from nuts would they keep feeding them to her? or would that be ok for the sake of family harmony? what kind of weird lesson is this for a kid? eat this, even though it makes you sick?
                                I agree with you. I was at a gathering a few months ago and a mother asked me whether it was okay to feed my daughter pizza. It's the first time anyone ever asked me whether it's okay to feed my kid X, and I thought it was so considerate.

                                My family doesn't take food intolerances seriously, as they have never dealt with any cases. Or at least, they don't connect the symptoms to food. My mother believes grains are absolutely necessary to health, more so than meat.

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