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Eating Indian Food and staying Primal

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  • #16
    If I want to stay primal-ish when eating out (a bunch of my friends love indian food), I choose a marinated, grilled meat - like chicken shashlik.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Balance View Post
      I absolutely love Indian food. And I know this sounds overly picky but a lot of restaurants now will use vegetable oil/soybean oil instead of Ghee (which is traditionally the go to cooking fat for Indian food) because of the fear of saturated fat.
      am quite sure they use soy oil because it's cheaper.
      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

      Ernest Hemingway

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Chanda View Post
        I could learn to make it myself, is it pretty complicated?
        It's easy. Go to an Asian grocery store. They will have all these spice pastes in jars or small plastic packages. They will usually have soybean oil as an ingredient but they are also quite concentrated and you'll be using about a teaspoon of soybean oil for a dinner of 4 servings or more, so don't sweat it. Follow the instructions on the label. It's usually something like cooking some meat and vegetables in a pan, adding ghee and spice paste or coconut milk and spice paste and simmering for a little while. We had butter chicken last night made at home with lots of ghee. Very delicious!

        Originally posted by Hedonist2 View Post
        Four to six times a year - take your best shot, enjoy, don't sweat it.
        ^ This
        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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        • #19
          I really like India food and have been doing a bunch of Thai as well.

          One grey area for me is lentils. I know that they are evil legumes. They are a decent, low cost protein source and with proper soaking and fermentation I think they work fine -- at least with me. I especially love dosas made from a fermented rice and lentil batter.

          What do others think about properly prepared lentils?

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          • #20
            I think there are a lot worse things you can eat than lentils. Soaked overnight, throw out the soak water, cook until mush, is probably pretty safe.
            Natural products super cheap @ iherb: Use discount code SEN850 at http://www.iherb.com/?rcode=sen850 for $10 off first order; free shipping $20+ order in USA

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            • #21
              You might also look for Indian simmering sauces at the local store or health food store. I cook up diced meat and set aside. I then grind up Mixed vegetables to a rice-like consistency(sometimes cauliflower as mentioned above) and simmer them first in the sauce for about 20 minutes and then add the meat back in for about 10 minutes. Easy and delicious. Seeds of Change is one brand that I use. Check closely the ingredients to make sure you agree with the contents. Good luck.
              Last edited by Terry H; 03-28-2013, 05:04 AM.

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              • #22
                Pastes and simmer sauces are processed food and should be last resort. Get authentic recipes and give them a go. Honestly, most curries and not at all hard. The biggest hurdle is getting the collection of spices. Some patience is required as the start of most curries is basically making the paste from scratch (with a healthy fat like ghee or coconut oil), browning the meat, then adding a few other ingredients and cooking slowly for two or three hours (less for chicken, much less for fish). Your patience will be rewarded with something of uncompromised healthfulness and superior flavour. As ye sow, so shall ye reap
                Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

                Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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                • #23
                  Personally, if you treat yourself to a curry, try not to worry about that stuff, but eat slowly and try to detect fullness before you eat too much of it. That way, you'll savour it more, and at the same time eat less if it does have bad stuff like corn starch/wheatflour etc.. But I'd suggest making your own. It's far more satisfying knowing that you made something healthy which is identical in taste to something at a restaurant. I say that having made a chicken Korma last night, with prospect of breaking my fast with leftovers!! oh yes..

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                  • #24
                    I love indian food but I'm also skeptical of the quality of ingredients at the restaurants. Most of the ready to use simmer sauces, such as Seeds of Change mentioned above, have canola oil and similar problematic ingredients.

                    Recently I found the brand Gourmantra. I got the butter chicken and it's a kit with just the spices, tomato sauce and non-gmo rice and you use your own oil so you can do it right with ghee. It's gluten free so no flour thickeners. You can order it from amazon but I found it at a local grocery.

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                    • #25
                      Thanks for all the replies and suggestions. I found a couple of different Primal recipes for butter chicken, and I'm going to try to make it at home (that way I can have it whenever I want, haha!) If I have good results, maybe I'll branch out and try making some curries and chicken korma.

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                      • #26
                        I have to disagree that pre-made curry pastes are "processed food". If you read the label it will be mostly spices and oil. Hardly any different than buying spices and oil separately, only you don't have to figure out what the heck asafatida is, nor do you have to buy a big $10 container of it only to use 1/8 teaspoon.
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by jnicholas View Post
                          I love indian food but I'm also skeptical of the quality of ingredients at the restaurants. Most of the ready to use simmer sauces, such as Seeds of Change mentioned above, have canola oil and similar problematic ingredients.

                          Recently I found the brand Gourmantra. I got the butter chicken and it's a kit with just the spices, tomato sauce and non-gmo rice and you use your own oil so you can do it right with ghee. It's gluten free so no flour thickeners. You can order it from amazon but I found it at a local grocery.
                          Thank you so much for this! I looked for this on Amazon, read reviews and found a really good deal on a pack of three. I'll try it and see how it goes.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            I have to disagree that pre-made curry pastes are "processed food". If you read the label it will be mostly spices and oil. Hardly any different than buying spices and oil separately, only you don't have to figure out what the heck asafatida is, nor do you have to buy a big $10 container of it only to use 1/8 teaspoon.
                            Well you're one of the lucky ones then because in Britain at least, I have yet to find any ready-made curry sauce/spice mix that now doesn't include sugar or other unneccessary ingredients. I have no problems with making my own obviously, but it seems like convenience didn't make it to Britain!

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