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Insulin and hypoglycemia - VLC vs PHD

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  • #16
    insulin is released every single time we eat. it doesn't "just" react to carbohydrates.
    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

    Ernest Hemingway

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Future_PB_Dr View Post
      Okay, I have a question for you science folk to ponder.

      I listened to a podcast today, Jimmy Moore's LLVLC, in which he was speaking of his experience with hypoglycemia after a long stint of a VLC WOE. His postprandial glucose was lower than his fasting blood glucose despite ingesting VLC meals.

      This made me begin to make connections in my head, not answers, but connections. I next thought of another podcast I had listened to a couple weeks back, "The Fat Burning Man" featuring host Abel James and Paul Jaminet, author of The Perfect Health Diet (PHD). Jaminet stated (I am going off memory) something along the lines of it being necessary to stimulate insulin so that your cells remain sensitive and know how to deal with glucose.

      And this brought me to my question, could VLC eating lead to hypoglycemia because the gluconeogenesis derived glucose causes the glucose spike in your blood, but your body, over time, doesn't know how to deal with the glucose? I understand the flaw in this question: protein intake will always lead to gluconeogenesis and raised blood glucose and thus insulin secretion. Yet, I am just curious if the body becomes deficient in its ability to deal with blood sugar spikes from gluconeogenesis due to VLC eating over time?

      What are your thoughts?
      These are very good questions and I think not all the answers are known. There is a fairly well-documented phenomenon in low carb eating that FBG will rise over time. I have seen this explained this occurs because your liver is providing all your glucose and since it gets there unaccompanied by food, the insulin response is not in proportion to the amount of glucose produced during the night. Once you eat in the morning, a normal insulin response ensues and blood glucose levels return to normal.

      Whether or not this scenario describes insulin resistance is anybody's guess. I think the more common insulin resistance occurs when someone overfeeds continually. Eating sugary/starchy food all day long even when not hungry causes all kinds of metabolic problems, including insulin resistance, over time.

      The last part of your question:
      And this brought me to my question, could VLC eating lead to hypoglycemia because the gluconeogenesis derived glucose causes the glucose spike in your blood, but your body, over time, doesn't know how to deal with the glucose? I understand the flaw in this question: protein intake will always lead to gluconeogenesis and raised blood glucose and thus insulin secretion. Yet, I am just curious if the body becomes deficient in its ability to deal with blood sugar spikes from gluconeogenesis due to VLC eating over time?
      I think is highly unlikely and I have never seen this described. Hypoglycemia is very unlikely in LC eating. Even in cases of prolonged starvation, the body will maintain a certain level of glucose, well above a hypoglycemic level, right up until death.

      Here is a good article on insulin you may find useful:
      Insulin Levels and Fat Loss | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald

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