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  • Recommendations for new skillet?

    My current skillet (12'' Calphalon) is getting a bit torn up, and I'm looking at possible replacements. One that struck me was this new Ozeri green-earth (ceramic) non-stick skillet. However, at least on Amazon, it's gotten mixed reviews.

    So any suggestions for a good twelve-inch skillet (for a standard electric stove - not gas, not inductive)? Preferably non-stick (although I suppose I could do without that, I've been using a dab of coconut oil recently to prevent burgers from sticking, works well). Not over-priced - I'm not looking for the cheapest, as it's a long-term purchase, but I don't see any reason to pay for a famous chef's picture on the cover, either.

  • #2
    I have been loving my cast iron skillets- use them daily. I have a 6" for eggs and a larger one for just about everything else- I also have stainless steel, but find I rarely use them once I got the cast iron ones.

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    • #3
      A lot of members use cast iron. You can often find them very cheaply at a GoodWill Store. Then season them and do not wash with soap again but wipe them out.
      "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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      • #4
        Third vote for the awesomeness of cast-iron.

        If you want stainless steel, Tramontina seems to be pretty good:
        Equipment: The All-Clad vs. Tramontina Skillet Showdown | Serious Eats
        Amazon.com: Tramontina Prima Tri-Ply Stainless Steel Fry Pan, 12": Home & Kitchen

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        • #5
          Ooo thanks for that link yodiewan. I have a nice cast iron one, but wanted to add a stainless steel one to replace my old chemical-leeching-what-metal-is-this? pan. This looks perfect.

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          • #6
            #4 for cast iron. Makes cooking easier and more fun.
            Some of you may die, but that is a risk I'm willing to take.

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            • #7
              Try nomnompaleo.com for suggestions on excellent cooking ware. The author has an extensive list about high-quality kitchen accessories to purchase.
              Travel, eat well, and learn about life - three things I love to do

              Curious about what YOU should pack next time you're on the road? Check out my Definitive Guide to Backpacking Nutrition

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              • #8
                nomnompaleo did also seem to prefer cast-iron, but I did notice one concern:

                It heats unevenly. Contrary to popular belief, iron is a poor conductor of heat, which means that the heat doesn't travel far from its source. Trying to use a 12-inch cast iron skillet on a 3-inch burner ring is an exercise in futility: the outer edges of the pan will never get hot.
                Fortunately, my electric burners are 7'', but it's still not the same size as the skillet.

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                • #9
                  Something else that occurs to me - is anyone using a cast-iron skillet on an electric stove? Just reading about the skillets and their thermal density, I'm wondering how many hours it will take, to heat up enough to fry a (grass-fed) burger?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cyclops View Post
                    Something else that occurs to me - is anyone using a cast-iron skillet on an electric stove? Just reading about the skillets and their thermal density, I'm wondering how many hours it will take, to heat up enough to fry a (grass-fed) burger?
                    I have a flat top electric stove, and it takes a couple minutes, but not very long. I can walk home from work (10 minutes each way), make an omelet, eat the omelet, and be back at work with about 15 minutes left on my lunch hour. Not sure if I could do that if it was an electric coil-type stove.
                    The Champagne of Beards

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                    • #11
                      I use stainless steel, with ghee or olive oil (low temp cooking only) to keep things from sticking, or enameled cast iron (Le Creuset). I don't use regular cast iron because I'm concerned about leaching iron into the food, especially if I'm cooking something acidic. Maybe that concern is overblown, but the options I mentioned work fine for me anyway.
                      LastBottleWines

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                      • #12
                        I have cast iron and stainless. I use my cast iron pan 365/yr with the stainless coming out only when I need a bigger pan. I use my 8" cast iron daily for cooking eggs and my 12" or 14" for cooking meats like burgers, chops, or reheating meats and vegetables. I even cook tomato based sauces in them to up the iron content of the food, although I believe the increase is quite minimal.

                        I'd love an enameled cast iron one to try out but I actually have more pans than a family of 9 could use and there are only three of us, so I have restrained myself.
                        Last edited by Primal123; 03-26-2013, 03:48 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Cast iron and stainless here also. I still have some nonstick pans just because they aren't damaged. Cast iron thrives on benign neglect, at which I am good (just ask any of my exes). I started with a small dutch oven that came with a lid that doubles as a 10" frying pan, and I purchased a muffin "tin" to make little egg/meat thingies. But I'm definitely going to get a loaf pan and various sized skillets as time goes by. Last night, I made some baked corned beef and eggs, and forgot to add a fat to keep it all from sticking, and it wasn't a problem.

                          I've learned that you can't do acidic things in new cast iron, (tomatoes), but that's easy to deal with. And since I've seen Bobby Flay cook with tomatoes in cast iron, I figure one day mine will be seasoned enough to deal with the acid.

                          It also makes a decent weapon. heh.
                          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                          B*tch-lite

                          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                          • #14
                            Ditto for cast iron. Absent cooking on a flat rock, seems the most primal. I never use non-stick, do not trust them. I read once that CA is also good to provide extra iron though that is seldom an issue if you eat primal. If you have non-primal housemates though it may matter especially for menstruating women.

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                            • #15
                              Scanpan Professional..........awesome but not cheap I have used calphalon, analon, stainless steel and cast iron. Cast iron is nice for some things but for me the Scanpan beats them all for regular stuff. The professional series are way better IMO.
                              CHEFS Catalog - Scanpan Professional Fry Pans customer reviews - product reviews - read top consumer ratings

                              Editing to agree with Springnr, that the Pro IQ are the ones that I have that I love. They come with handle sleeves.
                              Last edited by Silvergirl; 03-26-2013, 10:34 PM.
                              Started Primal June 2012 at 148.5lbs, and 5' 1", reached goal weight in 5 months.
                              Lowest weight 93lbs - too thin. Now stable at around 100lbs much better weight for me at my age.
                              Primal, minus eggs, dairy and a myriad of other allergens.

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