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  • #16
    Hi

    This is a stab in the dark....but I had terrible weight problems all my life and it wasnt until I disocvered I was salycilate intolerant that I was able to turn it around. My diet is Marks rimal diet but not deli meats or bacon(nitrites) and no currys of any sort as curry is very high in salycilate.

    The diet you mention has some foods with preservatives particularly sulphites. If your wife is chemically sensitive all of these foods could be effecting her and she may only be experiencing weight gain as her symptom. Other symptoms include sinus...bloated stomach....gastrointestinal upset and aching joints. Some people only have weight gain and a bit of bloating as their symptoms others have much nastier symptoms which can also include asthma.

    Hope this helps as another way of looking at what might be causing her to have issues with her weight loss.

    Kind Regards

    Elizabeth

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    • #17
      a great site you can go to is

      salycilatesensitivity.com

      there is a food list and forum to get you started

      also gogle sue dengate fed up with food additives

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      • #18
        I dont think wheat is one tenth as bad as most glutenophobes believe. Will it damage your body over time? Maybe but so does almost any food you could think of and people have been eating it to ripe old ages for thousands of years. Gluten free is a fad, plain and simple.

        Bottom line for me, i love it and eat it with no worries. Sucks to be those of you with "intolerances" or just plain scared to eat it but 90% of the time its probably just psychosomatic or you are sick for some other reason (pufa). The other 10% have my condolences.
        Last edited by Zach; 03-23-2013, 06:29 PM.

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        • #19
          His argument that the people with food sensitivities are attracked to paleo could sure be true. It works. But then you have to ask why these people developed food sensitives. By removing all grains and sugar you could also say that we're just against modern food growing and processing, chemical additives, hybredization, and GMO. That would be just as true.
          "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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          • #20
            I allow myself one wheat day (actually one non-primal day) per week. It's not a license to binge on crap, just a day when I can eat a po'boy or a plate of pasta.

            While my symptoms are minimal, I do wake the next morning to a rather loud fart. I thought it was my imagination, but now that I'm aware, the correlation is clear: the morning after eating wheat, I fart. It's not enough to make me give up wheat entirely, but it's enough for me to consider it nothing I want as a major component of my daily diet.
            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

            B*tch-lite

            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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            • #21
              He doesn't specifically mention target wheat. Grains come in over a hundred varieties and types, saying grains are bad is such a broad faulty statement it's no wonder it gets laughed at. Phytates and lectins are way overblown. The dose makes the poison and in moderate amounts both can be actually beneficial for you. Even celiac is more complicated, I have known celiacs who can tolerate certain rye bread if it's prepared in a more traditional way.

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              • #22
                Anyone know if sensitivity to other grains/grasses correlates to a higher sensitivity to gluten? I'm curious because I'm highly, HIGHLY intolerant to buckwheat. Picture the worst, most painful, most body-destroying vomit session you ever had--this is what happens to me ten minutes after ingesting even the smallest amount of buckwheat. Like I drank an entire bottle of Captain Morgan to wash down five-day-old meatloaf from a street vendor, that's the level of barfing we're talking about. Now, I don't get nauseous from wheat or gluten, but I do get other obvious intolerance reactions like a described before. Is it just a coincidence?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by heatseeker View Post
                  Anyone know if sensitivity to other grains/grasses correlates to a higher sensitivity to gluten? I'm curious because I'm highly, HIGHLY intolerant to buckwheat. Picture the worst, most painful, most body-destroying vomit session you ever had--this is what happens to me ten minutes after ingesting even the smallest amount of buckwheat. Like I drank an entire bottle of Captain Morgan to wash down five-day-old meatloaf from a street vendor, that's the level of barfing we're talking about. Now, I don't get nauseous from wheat or gluten, but I do get other obvious intolerance reactions like a described before. Is it just a coincidence?
                  Lots of people who are gluten-intolerant also have problems with dairy and other grains. I'm sensitive to buckwheat and corn.

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                  • #24
                    Grains are just so nutritionally void they bring nothing to the table but calories with a side of probable autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Even assuming you are one of the few lucky ones left on the tolerant end of the bell curve there are just far better choices.

                    Unless your an endurance athlete or trying to put on an extra couple hundred pounds there is no sense in eating them in any first world society.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                      Grains are just so nutritionally void they bring nothing to the table but calories with a side of probable autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Even assuming you are one of the few lucky ones left on the tolerant end of the bell curve there are just far better choices.

                      Unless your an endurance athlete or trying to put on an extra couple hundred pounds there is no sense in eating them in any first world society.
                      There it is isnt it. Arent we so lucky that we get to worry and argue about such nonesense. I eat it because it tastes amazing and there is nothing that even comes close to replacing bread. Im not an endurence athlete and i am as lean as i have ever been. I have been eating wheat since childhood, just like everyone else that had no clue about gluten or the dangers of grains until they stumbled upon paleo.

                      Im not saying people arent sick and that grains (wonderbread) arent making them worse. I just cant stand the elitest, hypocritcal attitude towards all things grains. There are mountains of difference between wonderbread and a non gmo organic wheat flour.

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                      • #26
                        ^ I was reading an interview with one of the head researches in this area and he had indicated a strong correlation between gluten sensitivities and introduction of wheat in the first year of life. If you look at our age brackets and the increasing reports of intolerance you will likely be able to track it back to the introduction of baby foods including cereals as the first recommended foods back about 40 (or more?) years ago or so. That and formula of course. An interesting correlation cause when you consider third world nations and our own society prior to this I'm sure that breast feeding occurred at least into the second year. A possible link. Just would make sense. Anyhow that is just one of the current hypothesis. Wouldn't it be crazy if we could substantially reduce the extent of intolerance just by putting cereal grains off for the first year or two of life?

                        This is about as straight forward scientific Q&A on the current available research in the area as I have seen. Not much in the way of theory, just a straight academic report on the current research by Dr. Fasano.

                        Pioneering Researcher Alessio Fasano M.D. on Gluten, Autoimmunity & Leaky Gut
                        Last edited by Neckhammer; 03-24-2013, 09:39 AM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Zach View Post
                          There are mountains of difference between wonderbread and a non gmo organic wheat flour.
                          Whatever you perceive these "mountains of difference" to be, there is no difference in gluten sensitivity between the two.

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                          • #28
                            Well i wont disagree with that because i dont think a baby should be eating anything besides breastmilk and maybe some fruits, tubers and animal products until their second birthday. I think formula is a crime against humanity. But remember, along with those grains is almost always some form of oils and corn or soy derivatives. So once again it might not be the grain directly but the interaction of the grain with a weakened gut and or immune system from the toxic substances.

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                            • #29
                              Yeah, I found that hypothesis rather interesting. Obviously third world and even traditional societies would not be introducing grains to a babies diet. Only our screwed up mentality would even have conceived such an idea.

                              As such if you throw traditional preparation, non-GMO wheat/other grains, and an upbringing congruent with not predisposing you to these autoimmune intolerance later in life..... hell, may very well be that they are a fine source of calories for ya.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                                Whatever you perceive these "mountains of difference" to be, there is no difference in gluten sensitivity between the two.
                                What i am saying is that 90% of gluten sensitivity is either psychosomatic or from something else that gluten aggravates. If you feel better eliminating grains from your diet and dont feel the need to search further, good right ahead. Just dont get on your soap box and proclaim "grains to be unfit for human consumption".

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