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Determining Calories to Loose Weight

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  • Determining Calories to Loose Weight

    When googling around to find a calorie calculator, I come up with lots of different numbers. Can anyone recommend a reliable calorie calculator?
    Last edited by FireFinder; 03-21-2013, 08:27 AM.

  • #2
    Lose, not loose.

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    • #3
      What Finnegans wake said.

      I like this:
      Calorie Calculator - Scooby's Home Workouts

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      • #4
        oops. right. sorry.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
          When googling around to find a calorie calculator, I come up with lots of different numbers. Can anyone recommend a reliable calorie calculator?
          They all vary depending on the formula they use. I always liked this one because you have some different options you can choose and it's not overbearing with options.

          My Basal needs
          Maintenance 1700

          here is a sample of me if I did 3 run of the mill workouts per week: just stay away from extreme fat loss numbers. a 500 calorie/day shortage is roughly 1 pound of fat/muscle loss per week.

          Maintenance 2338
          CALORIES/DAY
          Fat Loss 1870
          CALORIES/DAY
          Extreme Fat Loss 1424
          CALORIES/DAY

          advice on zig zagging

          Maintenance Fat Loss Extreme Fat Loss
          Monday 2338 1871 1424
          Tuesday 1871 1497 1424
          Wednesday 2806 2245 1709
          Thursday 2338 1871 1424
          Friday 2105 1684 1424
          Saturday 2572 2058 1567
          Sunday 2338 1871 1424


          or if you are fond of intermittent fasting then work the calories out around your fasts. I tend to get one 24hr fast in a week and an 18hr (lunch to breakfast)

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          • #6
            No matter what calculator you use, ultimately you will have to make a decision down the line on whether its estimate was accurate, close, or far off. Your own body is unique, and online calculators are based on large numbers of people, not you specifically.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
              No matter what calculator you use, ultimately you will have to make a decision down the line on whether its estimate was accurate, close, or far off. Your own body is unique, and online calculators are based on large numbers of people, not you specifically.
              This.

              Calorie counting was helpful for me to get a rough idea of what was going on but I never found it sustainable, e.g., I used it for about a month as I noted macros and total calories and determined portion sizes. But now my eating is intuitive: eat good foods until full; snack less, and incorporate occasional intermittent fasting, as desired.

              Part of the problem of calorie counting is the issue of absorbtion. Nuts are high-fat, highly caloric, but much of that fat simply passes through and is excreted. So trusting the calorie count based on heat released from burning nuts in a lab is inaccurate. This actually may be the case with many fatty foods, as noted by the folks who eat a lot of coconut oil and suffer from loose stools, if you'll pardon the observation: not all of it is taken up by the body.

              I think obsessive calorie counting runs counter to the ultimate goals of Primal. Knowledge is good; obsession and orthorexia, not so much.

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              • #8
                Not myfitnesspal. Since I started PB two and a half weeks ago it's been yelling at me how I need 500 calories less, twice as much carbs, half the fat, and much less protein. It tells me that if I continue eating like this, I'll stop fitting through the door soon. My scale and measuring tape tell me a different story. It has a good food database, though.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Yana View Post
                  Not myfitnesspal. Since I started PB two and a half weeks ago it's been yelling at me how I need 500 calories less, twice as much carbs, half the fat, and much less protein. It tells me that if I continue eating like this, I'll stop fitting through the door soon. My scale and measuring tape tell me a different story. It has a good food database, though.
                  MFP is ridiculous. I don't find its calorie targets realistic, either. But you can set your own custom calorie goals and macro ratios. I also never click on the "complete today's entry" where it tells you how much you will weigh.
                  Last edited by unchatenfrance; 03-21-2013, 10:28 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I've always used Fat Secret. It doesn't have all those warnings I'm reading about here.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                      No matter what calculator you use, ultimately you will have to make a decision down the line on whether its estimate was accurate, close, or far off. Your own body is unique, and online calculators are based on large numbers of people, not you specifically.
                      Yep, once you dial things in you can even put away those kitchen scales and measuring devices. Many ways to go about calories.

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                      • #12
                        yeah, honestly counting calories is a huge pain in the ass for me- it seems so not exact because i tend to make food and eat it and i guess i'm too lazy to measure my olive oil before pouring it on my salad, or put my butter in a measuring spoon before it goes in the pan or determine if my apple is big, medium or small. but, i gotta drop a few lb's so something needs to get tightened up!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by FireFinder View Post
                          yeah, honestly counting calories is a huge pain in the ass for me- it seems so not exact because i tend to make food and eat it and i guess i'm too lazy to measure my olive oil before pouring it on my salad, or put my butter in a measuring spoon before it goes in the pan or determine if my apple is big, medium or small. but, i gotta drop a few lb's so something needs to get tightened up!
                          I'm trying to lose some vanity pounds and for that counting is key for me. Once you measure for a few days you'll be able to tell what's a tbsp of butter, a medium apple, etc, so you won't have to physically measure every single thing before logging it in, especially for things like vegetables (ie. 2 cups vs 3 cups of greens is something like 10 calories' difference, big whoop).

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                          • #14
                            I also wrote a guide on how to calculate your calories, it's pretty simple: How Many Calories Per Day Should I Eat To Lose Weight?
                            I am not a bodybuilding/fat loss/strength training "guru" BUT I achieved a lean state with ease after learning the correct way to train and eat and I want to HELP YOU achieve the same.

                            Getting fit is also about managing your mindset:
                            http://getfitmindset.com

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                            • #15
                              You'd better read this: There Is No Such Thing As A “Calorie” (To Your Body) - GNOLLS.ORG

                              The sooner you get the notion of 'calories' out of your head and start thinking about eating good food that doesn't make you fat, the sooner you'll have the body of your dreams (or as close as you can get!).

                              Takeaways
                              There is no biochemical system in our bodies whose input is a “calorie”.
                              The food we eat has many possible fates, only one of which approximates the definition of a dietary “calorie”.
                              The fate of a “calorie” of food depends completely on its specific molecular composition, the composition of the foods accompanying it, and how those molecules interact with our current metabolic and nutritional state—our satiety.
                              Therefore, the concept of the “calorie”, as applied to nutrition, is an oversimplification so extreme as to be untrue in practice.
                              Therefore, the concept of “calories in, calories out”, or CICO, is also unhelpful in practice.


                              The health-supporting fates of food involve being used as raw materials to build and repair tissues; to build enzymes, cofactors, and hormones; to build bile, mucus, and other necessary secretions; to support “good” gut bacteria, while discouraging “bad” bacteria; and, once all those needs are taken care of, providing energy sufficient to perform those tasks (but no more).
                              Therefore, we should eat foods which are made of the raw materials we need to perform and support the above functions.
                              Biochemical individuality means that the optimum diet for different people will differ—as will their tolerance for suboptimal diets.
                              However, eating like a predator—a diet based on meat, fish, shellfish, vegetables and fruit in season, and just enough starch to support your level of physical activity—is an excellent starting point.
                              Live in freedom, live in beauty.

                              JS


                              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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