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  • #16
    Vitacost has their name brand items which are good quality at a reasonable price, with free shipping if you spend a modest amount and are buying their brand.

    That's where I've been getting mine--both fish oil and cod liver oil liquid (lemon flavor). I've gotten used to it and
    just take swallow out of the bottle every day or two. It is my personal bottle, of course. . .

    I get their coconut oil too--both through subscription to save cash.
    Last edited by missblue; 03-20-2013, 06:53 PM.

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    • #17
      I'm using orange flavored Coromega. They say it's purified to get rid of contaminants and it tastes good.

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      • #18
        Fish oil is a drying oil, similar to flax/linseed and other highly polyunsaturated fats. That means they dry into a glasslike film at room temperature in the presence of air and light. This is because they are extremely unstable. Fish oil is the most unstable - more unstable than the ALA-based vegetarian omega-3 counterparts because it is a longer chain fat.

        I would never, ever, ever take fish oil. You are taking a highly refined drying oil (almost certainly from farmed fish) that has been transported likely hundreds of miles in the back of a hot truck, then sat under fluorescent lighting for weeks and months. If your fish oil isn't rancid when you buy it, it'll oxidize inside you.

        All research I've done on fish oil points that it is extremely unstable and extremely toxic when isolated from the fish due to its incredible instability. It is essentially a precursor to varnish or stain - they were traditionally made out of seed and fish oils because they turn into a shiny, glass-like surface upon application due to rapid oxidation. Now that the paint market is dominated by chemicals and not natural seed and fish-based oils, they simply shifted to the food market. They're selling their toxic seed and fish oils as health food, now. Soy, anyone? Just wait until you see the damage fish oil will be linked to 30 years from now, just like seed oils are starting to become linked to.

        Fish oil appears to be anti-inflammatory because its effect is similar to an NSAID - it simply shuts off the immune system response. Its rapid oxidation inside the body is so extreme, you basically shut off your immune system. Lovely.

        The Great Fish Oil Experiment

        The consequences of taking fish oil can be severe. If you want to eat fish, eat fish, but there is no reason to purposely supplement omega 3. Instead, focus on reducing omega 6 intake. There is plenty of omega 3 naturally in red meats, eggs and dairy. You don't need much at all.
        Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-20-2013, 09:21 PM.
        Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by springnr View Post
          Rancid fish oil is not good for you...
          So break open a capsule every now and then to check.
          All fish oil is rancid. Just like all canola and soybean oils are rancid before you even bring them home from the store. They are highly purified, refined oils. They are deodorized so you can't tell they're rancid.

          The Truth About Fish Oil

          How Fish Oil Is Processed

          Getting the omega–3 rich oil out of these bits of fish can be accomplished in several ways.

          First, the proteins in the fish are denatured, which means that heating the fish to 200 degrees for 30 minutes changes the proteins’ chemical structure. The fish are then put into presses to extract the oil.

          Once the oil has been pulled out of the fish, it can be bleached, deodorized, or purified to make it more palatable. To bleach fish oil the manufacturers use bleaching clays. Removing the fishy smell requires deodorizing the fish by injecting extremely hot steam into the oil.

          Finally the fish oil is poured through activated charcoal to get rid of contaminants like mercury, PCBs, and dioxins.
          Fish oil is heated - and since fish oil is so unstable even at room temperature, it's likely a good portion trans fat. Possibly more than seed oils because it's even less stable. It's bleached and deodorized just like rancid seed oils as well. It is awful, acute poison.

          Extrapolate - we don't like consuming refined seed oils because they are high in omega 6, which oxidizes rapidly during not only the cooking process at home, but in the refining process itself and on the store shelf. Well, fish oil is even more unstable than omega 6 seed oils. It is a health nightmare.
          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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          • #20
            This one is good, too.

            What Do Margarine And Fish Oil Have In Common? | Delia Health

            Fish oil is also sensitive to damage from the elements

            Fish oil falls into the category of an Omega 3 polyunsaturated fat. It is therefore also very sensitive to damage caused through exposure to light, heat and oxygen. In fact, fish oil is 25 times more sensitive to this kind of damage than the plant forms of Omega 3 are. This is simply due to the differences between the molecular structure of fish oil and the plant forms of Omega 3.
            Uh oh.

            Claims of purified fish oil makes consumers feel safe

            This is where the story gets really interesting. To remove most of the heavy metals, PCBs and dioxins, known cancer-causing compounds, from the fish oil, manufacturers have to heat the oil. When they heat the oil they can evaporate most of the toxins out of the oil. But, in the process of heating the fish oil, they are creating toxic fat molecules.

            Knowing that the fish oil they are using is purified, comforts consumers, and this is a selling point used by fish oil manufacturers. They are telling the consumer that their products contain very little toxins, but they are excluding the explanation of how they got rid of the toxins! And what the result of this purifying process is. That haven’t told the consumer that heating the fish oil is creating damaged fat molecules, like trans fats, which lead to toxicity and aging.

            Unfortunately, the presence of trans fats in fish oil is not the only piece of bad news. Other damaged fats, like polymerized, cyclised and cross-linked fats are present too. The only damaged fats we know a lot about are trans fats. These other damaged fats have not been researched in any depth yet, although there is some evidence to suggest that they are much more damaging than trans fats are.
            Mmm! Trans fats! Yum.

            Margarine and fish oil – the similarities

            The general public is now aware of the fact that polyunsaturated fats, also called Essential Fatty Acids or EFA’s, are essential for optimal physical and mental health. Although most people have focused on Omega 3, in the form of flax or fish oil, the knowledge of the importance of the Essential Fatty Acids has become much more wide-spread.

            Unfortunately, people have not been told the whole story about these critical fats. Advising people about their benefits, and leaving out the part about how sensitive to damage they are, is leaving out a very important part of the story. The average consumer has been unaware of the damaging effects that inexpensive and careless manufacturing processes cause to these delicate nutrients.

            It has taken decades for the truth about margarine to reach the general public. Many people are appalled when they realize that they have unwittingly been consuming a product which they were led to believe was healthy, but in fact contains damaging trans fats. In the same way, people are consuming fish oil, believing that they are only consuming beneficial ingredients. They are not aware of what else may be hiding in their supplement.
            Fresh fish is a fine, healthy food. It is also completely and totally unnecessary to be healthy. As for fish oil, the only thing it's good for is seasoning cast iron and making homemade paint. DO NOT CONSUME.
            Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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            • #21
              Green pasture is the only one I could find which is not heated. Plus it is full of vitamins and more omega 3 than many other brands.
              You defenitely want green pasture, take their butter oil to if you can afford it. Take the cod liver oil/butter oil blend gel, not capsules, the gel is much cheaper per gram.
              well then

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              • #22
                Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                This one is good, too.

                What Do Margarine And Fish Oil Have In Common? | Delia Health



                Uh oh.



                Mmm! Trans fats! Yum.



                Fresh fish is a fine, healthy food. It is also completely and totally unnecessary to be healthy. As for fish oil, the only thing it's good for is seasoning cast iron and making homemade paint. DO NOT CONSUME.
                Green Pasture Fermented cod liver oil
                well then

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Gadsie View Post
                  Green Pasture Fermented cod liver oil
                  That would be like taking cold pressed canola oil, except much worse. Let's assume it's not heated to several hundred degrees. Fish oil oxidizes in the refrigerator. It's still been exposed to 70-80+ degree room temperatures, air and light. If you wouldn't want to use cold pressed canola oil that's been sitting out on the counter for weeks or months, you wouldn't want to take that fish oil since canola oil is much more stable and prone to oxidation.

                  Admittedly, cold liver oil has massive quantities of Vitamin A and D, and it's much more proven and "old world" than refined fish oil from menhaden and sardines, so there may be legit reasons to take it. My mother has some skin issues and one cod liver oil a day seems to rid her of them, and they come back if she stops taking them. My guess is the Vitamin A is the cause. But if you can get a better source of Vitamin A and D - like butteroil and sunlight - it may be a better choice.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                    That would be like taking cold pressed canola oil, except much worse. Let's assume it's not heated to several hundred degrees. Fish oil oxidizes in the refrigerator. It's still been exposed to 70-80+ degree room temperatures, air and light. If you wouldn't want to use cold pressed canola oil that's been sitting out on the counter for weeks or months, you wouldn't want to take that fish oil since canola oil is much more stable and prone to oxidation.

                    Admittedly, cold liver oil has massive quantities of Vitamin A and D, and it's much more proven and "old world" than refined fish oil from menhaden and sardines, so there may be legit reasons to take it. My mother has some skin issues and one cod liver oil a day seems to rid her of them, and they come back if she stops taking them. My guess is the Vitamin A is the cause. But if you can get a better source of Vitamin A and D - like butteroil and sunlight - it may be a better choice.
                    Unless you have some substantial evidence I don't buy this first paragraph one little bit. You would have to show that this stuff is highly oxidized in its fermented state. Fermentation preserves, and there are plenty of studies that show certain vitamins in conjunction with PUFA mitigate/eliminate issues associated with PUFA oxidation anyhow. Vitamin E comes to mind.

                    So you have a high vitamin substance that has been fermented in a traditional manner that you would like to claim is as bad as canola oil left out on a shelf for months? Nah, I don't think so.

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                    • #25
                      First off, I am also a big believer in eating actual fish over supplementation.

                      I personally wouldn't consider fermented cod liver oil to be in the same category as fish oil. FCLO seems more like actual food because of its co-factors and the fact it is minimally processed than your typical fish oil supplements which could be rancid and oxidized by the time it hits the shelves.

                      For people who want to compare fish oil brands. The international fish oil standards program goes through a process of rating most popular fish oils on the market.
                      The International Fish Oil Standards Program
                      "If man made it, don't eat it" - Jack Lallane

                      People say I am on a "crazy" diet. What is so crazy about eating veggies, fruits, seafood and organ meats? Just because I don't eat whole wheat and processed food doesn't make my diet "crazy". Maybe everyone else with a SAD are the "crazy" ones for putting that junk in their system.

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                      • #26
                        I take Super Concentrate Omega-3 from Stronger Faster Healthier. (Formerly Omega Maine). Their formula is very potent. It may seem expensive, but at 1 tsp per day these bottles last 6 months. I bought 2 bottles at the end of 2011 and still finishing the last bottle. Not sure about heating or processing. They mention 'molecular distillation.'

                        10 oz SO3 Super Concentrate Omega-3 - Stronger Faster Healthier

                        Each teaspoon delivers over 3100mg of EPA and DHA
                        Soy free, gluten free and sugar free
                        Five delicious flavors: tangerine, mint, lemon, vanilla and chocolate
                        All natural concentrated omega 3 oil
                        Liquid form to optimize absorption efficiently
                        Third party tested: our SO3 oil meets or exceeds CRN, GOED, IFOS, WHO and Prop 65 Standards.
                        Our product is prepared from sardines, herring and anchovies using molecular distillation making it possible to concentrate EPA and DHA.
                        Mercury free, no heavy metals, no toxins

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                          Unless you have some substantial evidence I don't buy this first paragraph one little bit. You would have to show that this stuff is highly oxidized in its fermented state. Fermentation preserves, and there are plenty of studies that show certain vitamins in conjunction with PUFA mitigate/eliminate issues associated with PUFA oxidation anyhow. Vitamin E comes to mind.

                          So you have a high vitamin substance that has been fermented in a traditional manner that you would like to claim is as bad as canola oil left out on a shelf for months? Nah, I don't think so.
                          You're assuming studies have been done to specifically analyze the trans fatty acid composition of various brands of fish oil. To my knowledge, none exist. Let's look at the facts:

                          1.) Fish oil is highly refined and typically comes from farmed fish.

                          2.) Fish oil is not fresh - it has been sitting in that bottle for awhile, and it's been exposed to heat, air and light the entire time.

                          3.) All soybean and canola oil on the shelf contains some degree of trans fatty acids due to the instability of the fats and the refinement process itself. It can be as much as 4.2%.

                          http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...244.x/abstract

                          4.) Fish oil is much less stable than canola and soybean oils.


                          This is where critical reasoning comes into play. Fish oils are exposed to similar conditions as canola and soybean oils. Canola and soybean oils all contain significant quantities of trans fats before even leaving the manufacturing plant. Fish oils are much less stable than canola and soybean oils.

                          Do you seriously think fish oils won't contain trans fats given that information?
                          Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                            You're assuming studies have been done to specifically analyze the trans fatty acid composition of various brands of fish oil. To my knowledge, none exist. Let's look at the facts:

                            1.) Fish oil is highly refined and typically comes from farmed fish.

                            2.) Fish oil is not fresh - it has been sitting in that bottle for awhile, and it's been exposed to heat, air and light the entire time.

                            3.) All soybean and canola oil on the shelf contains some degree of trans fatty acids due to the instability of the fats and the refinement process itself. It can be as much as 4.2%.

                            LEVELS OF TRANS GEOMETRICAL ISOMERS OF ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS IN SOME UNHYDROGENATED U. S. VEGETABLE OILS - O'KEEFE - 2007 - Journal of Food Lipids - Wiley Online Library

                            4.) Fish oil is much less stable than canola and soybean oils.


                            This is where critical reasoning comes into play. Fish oils are exposed to similar conditions as canola and soybean oils. Canola and soybean oils all contain significant quantities of trans fats before even leaving the manufacturing plant. Fish oils are much less stable than canola and soybean oils.

                            Do you seriously think fish oils won't contain trans fats given that information?
                            I was responding to the one specific brand in question... which is greenpasture fermented cod liver oil. We all know (or should) that there is a HUGE variance in food and manufacturing quality depending on supplier. So where your concerns are valid when it comes to some supermarket brand junk you can not reasonably extrapolate that to a superior product such as this Purity Statement - Green Pasture .

                            1. From wild caught fish
                            2. Fermented and kept air tight in light resistant bottles
                            3 and 4. FCLO has lower levels of O3 than concentrated fish oil pills with an abundance of stabilizing vitamins and natural cofactors. Most of the problem with PUFA's is endogenous oxidation anyhow rather than the exogenous sort.

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                            • #29
                              I use these along with wild salmon. And cod for pure enjoyment

                              Vitacost Norwegian Salmon Oil 100% Wild Caught -- 2,200 mg per serving - 240 Softgels - Vitacost

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                                I was responding to the one specific brand in question... which is greenpasture fermented cod liver oil. We all know (or should) that there is a HUGE variance in food and manufacturing quality depending on supplier. So where your concerns are valid when it comes to some supermarket brand junk you can not reasonably extrapolate that to a superior product such as this Purity Statement - Green Pasture .

                                1. From wild caught fish
                                2. Fermented and kept air tight in light resistant bottles
                                3 and 4. FCLO has lower levels of O3 than concentrated fish oil pills with an abundance of stabilizing vitamins and natural cofactors. Most of the problem with PUFA's is endogenous oxidation anyhow rather than the exogenous sort.
                                I agree that a fish oil that is fermented and not heated is going to be superior to the highly refined, heated ones on the market. However, it is still an oil prone to rancidity and I strongly doubt it isn't at least partially oxidized. Fish oil has traditionally been used to make paint products because it hardens into a glasslike finish at room temperature with normal exposure to air and light. It's impossible to shield it competely from all air, heat and light.

                                I think fish is the least healthy meat due to the high PUFA content. It may not be blatantly unhealthy like fish oil is, but I think it's one of the reasons why Inuits age so poorly - high levels of cold water fish. Warm water fish, which are usually very lean and contain little fat, seem to be associated with healthy traditional societies. I rank my meats by the ratio of saturatedolyunsaturated fat, which puts most fish dead last. What a shame because salmon is pretty darn good.
                                Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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