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Kerrygold (grass-fed) cheese?

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  • Kerrygold (grass-fed) cheese?

    I have been trying to limit our dairy to only raw and/or grass-fed. Dairy is like crack to me, and I tend to over-indulge and snack on it. We do have a local source for raw milk/kefir and raw milk cheeses, but they are very expensive so we only order once or twice a month.

    Thanks to St. Patty's Day, Kerrygold cheese is on sale all over the place this week, Aldi has Dubliner and Blarneycastle for $2.99!! (for comparison, the sale price at Bi-Lo is still $5.29) How bad is Kerrygold cheese in the grand scheme of dairy? It's made from grass-fed milk, but it's also pasteurized. I'm debating on stocking up, as the "use by" dates are well in the future. I wish I'd stocked up more on the raw milk, organic sharp cheddar they had a couple of months ago--I did buy a lot, but we also ate it all. I wish cheese were easier to freeze, making it easier to avoid just snacking on.

    I've already stocked up on Kerrygold butter--it's buy one, get one free at Bi-Lo, making it $1.60!! In fact, I'm going back for more this afternoon now that I know it freezes (though that doesn't really matter, as the use by dates are in 2014), and I'm also going to throw a bunch in the grokpot for ghee.

  • #2
    If you're going to eat mass-produced cheese, Kerrygold is the way to go.

    Nomnomnom.
    Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

    If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

    Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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    • #3
      Love the stuff. Easy availability, good quality and it tastes good.
      Durp.

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      • #4
        For what it's worth, kerrygold cheese was on the approved cheese list in Rich Food Poor Food. Most others they highlight are raw

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        • #5
          it's very hard to get raw cheese in the u.s.

          Some types of harder cheeses that are unpasteurized are actually available legally in most areas as long as they've been kept under certain conditions. They must have been aged at least 60 days in an environment held at not below 35F (1C) this process makes the cheese more acidic, killing most potential sources of bacterial infection.
          from: Is Raw Milk Cheese Really Illegal in the United States?

          once i gave up krap supermarket cheese and switched to all grass-fed, i am no longer a cheese junkie. i eat a little here and there, but used to want it everyday and had trouble controlling portions. that to me speaks volumes to the differing nutritional profiles.
          As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

          Ernest Hemingway

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          • #6
            Well, it's not raw dairy, but if you don't have access to the raw stuff then it is a pretty good second choice if dairy makes it into your version of primal.
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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