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Organic veggies taste better - GMO impact on kid tastes?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Gladmorning View Post
    Man, let me tell you. I live in the corn belt USA. The ANIMALS won't even touch this shit. You're right on the money. Got any space around the house? Plant some things for your own. Afraid to start from seed? Go to any store in the spring and buy some plants ready to put in the ground. Doesn't take a lot of space to grow a tomato bush, couple heads of broccoli and some carrots. Trust me, then you'll REALLY taste the difference. I can't even eat organic things with a crap ton of seasoning.

    ~Grow Gardens, Not Lawns.

    GROW GARDENS, NOT LAWNS is awesome! I've been trying to convert my lot for the past few years. Books on permaculture and homesteading are great for this. Here are a couple resources if anyone cares:

    Amazon.com: Gaia's Garden, Second Edition: A Guide To Home-Scale Permaculture (9781603580298): Toby Hemenway: Books

    The Backyard Homestead: Produce all the food you need on just a quarter acre!: Carleen Madigan: 9781603421386: Amazon.com: Books

    Anyhow, I'm not positive that organic tastes better than non-organic. What I do know for certain is fresh from my garden or a farmers market tastes a helluva lot better than anything off the supermarket shelf.

    So I think organic and non-GMO are great for a variety of reasons, but freshness is paramount for taste.

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    • #17
      Seriously if you are new to gardening the easiest way is to get a blend of lettuce seeds, carrot seeds, radish seeds, parsnips seeds, and dill. Spread those buggers all togeather in a bed.... cover with a quarter inch of compost and water. Thats your spring planting. Happy days!

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      • #18
        Teach-

        I know tree removal is expensive, but after the trees fill out, make a strategic choice and take out one of the trees. You would be amazed at how much one can grow in a small space. Do yourself a favor and google these three things: square foot gardening, urban gardening and container gardening. Oh, also, look into edible landscape.

        The push for organis from the PB irritates me. Organic cert. Started off as a good thing. Now it's taken over by money mongering beaurocrats that are pushing the little farms out and shoving people into out sourcing and becoming the next "big guy." It is a bunch of crap. Of course, if you dont believe me, you can mostly certainly research for yourself.

        And, like neckhammer suggested, if you cant grow it, find a farmer's market. Next best thing, only more expensive. Growing your own is the healthiest and most economical way. Period.
        The process is simple: Free your mind, and your ass will follow.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Gladmorning View Post
          Teach-

          I know tree removal is expensive, but after the trees fill out, make a strategic choice and take out one of the trees. You would be amazed at how much one can grow in a small space. Do yourself a favor and google these three things: square foot gardening, urban gardening and container gardening. Oh, also, look into edible landscape.

          The push for organis from the PB irritates me. Organic cert. Started off as a good thing. Now it's taken over by money mongering beaurocrats that are pushing the little farms out and shoving people into out sourcing and becoming the next "big guy." It is a bunch of crap. Of course, if you dont believe me, you can mostly certainly research for yourself.

          And, like neckhammer suggested, if you cant grow it, find a farmer's market. Next best thing, only more expensive. Growing your own is the healthiest and most economical way. Period.
          I don't think I'll need to remove any trees, and realistically that isn't in the finances any time soon. I think I'll be able to find some sunny spots. I think our front yard will get a good amount of sun, but then worry if I'll be "allowed" to grow there. Although I love the flowers that our plants produced last year. We'll just have to see, once all the snow melts! I also need to do a better job of picking foods we'll actually eat. It'll take us a couple years most likely, but my kids are learning right along with me and they enjoy tending the garden.

          I understand your point about the organic cert. I wish the others had to get their food okayed for consumption since organic is what good used to be. Wouldn't that make more sense? I know of a farmer's market nearby that I plan to hit up when it starts in June.

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          • #20
            I recently started buying organic food and agree with JoanieL, tomatoes are soooo much better! They are actually red and juicy! For a while i wouldn't touch tomatoes in Australia because they are barely edible compared to the ones in Serbia (where my family is from). Actually in Serbia, those tomatoes would be fed to the farm animals, since nobody would buy them!
            Strawberry's are also a lot sweeter. The difference with other food is more subtle but Ive noticed generally the flavours are stronger, for example garlic is more garlicy, capsicum is also stronger.
            Other than that, produce is generally smaller and less pretty looking (which is good!) I think if you can afford it... even just every other week, it's worth it, since nobody really know the long term health effects of GM produce.

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            • #21
              I think it's the likely that organics are fresher by nature than conventional, though heirloom organic veggies definitely taste different. My 13yo son insisted that he hated strawberries his entire life. We went to a pick-your-own farm for fun one afternoon (not organic, but they used more natural practices than a commercial farm) and I made him try one. He ended up eating a pint by himself! (for the record, strawberries are one of the things I ALWAYS buy organic except in that type of circumstance)

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              • #22
                That's excellent news, Teach. I am so glad to see a parents learning right along with their children. Yes, it's going to take a few years to learn, but it is SO worth it. A piece of advice: don't let failure make you quit. Keep trying until you get the results you're looking for! It's a very rewarding experience.

                Side note: If you're in subs of Chicago, you should still be able to grow some veggies, as long as you aren't a member of a Home Owner's Association that forbids it. That should really be the only thing that would stop you.
                The process is simple: Free your mind, and your ass will follow.

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