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full-fat vs fat-free greek yogurt?

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  • #16
    I usually get the 0% or 2% Fage greek yogurt--not because I'm concerned about the fat, but because the taste of the full fat variety is too rich for me.

    I don't understand the comment above about the use of artificial sweetener (particularly in plain yogurt). I don't believe that's the case, at least as far as Fage's products go...

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    • #17
      Originally posted by UTfootball747 View Post
      I usually get the 0% or 2% Fage greek yogurt--not because I'm concerned about the fat, but because the taste of the full fat variety is too rich for me.

      I don't understand the comment above about the use of artificial sweetener (particularly in plain yogurt). I don't believe that's the case, at least as far as Fage's products go...
      You're talking about one brand: Fage. They may be doing things right, but the vast majority don't.

      Grab some of the Yoplait, Dannon, or other popular brands and do a side-by-side. Low-fat/light/fat-free/etc. = increased sugar or artificial sweeteners in most cases. The big NYT article that was linked to all over the forums about General Mills, Coke, and other big food names specifically call out that the fat-free Yoplait yogurts have more sugar in it per serving than Lucky Charms cereal.
      >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
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      • #18
        Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
        Wrong. Fage nonfat has same sugar/carb and more protein, same with Chobani. Can't tell the difference in taste.
        Note the "as far as I'm aware". It is certainly the case for the brands available in the UK.

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        • #19
          If you want fat free yogurt go with Icelandic Skyr. They really have the taste and texture down. It's a lot thicker than the nonfat greek yogurt and was designed to be made from skim milk originally anyway.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Richard Seekins View Post
            ...I don't see the point in low fat versions of anything
            Quoted for truthiness.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MissJecka View Post
              The big NYT article that was linked to all over the forums about General Mills, Coke, and other big food names specifically call out that the fat-free Yoplait yogurts have more sugar in it per serving than Lucky Charms cereal.
              THAT made my eyes bug out for realz! i gave up all those yogurts years ago becuase i was starving an hour after i ate a big bowl. hmmph. go figure, lol.

              op and everybody else: for whatever reason, yogurt labels contain the carb content of the cream/milk before fermentation. it should more correctly be labeled like cheese, so figure about 1/2 the amount carbs actually listed on the container. this applies only to plain yogurt -- not any of the garbagey commercial brands with industrial ingredients. fwiw, many of the big players, like dannon, add cultures back after processing the yogurt and they're dead, so useless for any health benefits, only good for marketing.
              As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

              Ernest Hemingway

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              • #22
                I wouldn't add dairy to your diet if you aren't eating it already. If you must eat yogurt, get pasture-raised full-fat plain (not Greek); it's the closest to nature.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Artbuc View Post
                  Wrong. Fage nonfat has same sugar/carb and more protein, same with Chobani. Can't tell the difference in taste.
                  I checked the label, and it doesn't have more carbs or sugars, and the ingredients list didn't have anything that looked bad (although I can't figure out how it's fat-free without adding other stuff).

                  I can tell the difference in taste though.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                    Fage is one of the few brands that doesn't add carbs to the 0 fat product (or maybe it's one gram of carb more per serving). Since the main reason to avoid fat free is the weird crap they usually put in to compensate for the missing fat, Fage is one of the few brands where the zero fat is okay imo. But if you have access to both, might as well eat the full fat one.
                    I bought both to compare. A month ago, I would've just went with the full fat one since I generally am suspicious of low-fat and fat-free versions of food products (most have added sugars, etc), but I saw more than a few threads on here saying fat-free greek yogurt is fine.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by 2ndChance View Post
                      I wouldn't add dairy to your diet if you aren't eating it already. If you must eat yogurt, get pasture-raised full-fat plain (not Greek); it's the closest to nature.
                      What is the difference between pasture-raised full-fat plain and Greek?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by MikeAtTaree View Post
                        The fat is the same as found in butter. And the Pure full fat yogurt has had the lactose fermented out by the microorganisms. Whereabouts are you? In Australia every supermarket has at least 4 different brands of Greek Style yogurt.

                        It also makes a great drink "Ayran" which Turks drink by the gallon, just whisk a couple of heaped tablespoons of full fat Greek Style Yogurt into a cup of water in a bowl and drink as a smoothie. Turks are mostly lactose intolerant so this is their drinking "milk". Sheeps yogurt is the best if you can get it.
                        Is there any difference between 'greek yogurt' and 'greek-style yogurt'? Fage is the only brand in our supermarket that's 'greek yogurt'.

                        I went to a gourmet supermarket yesterday and found sheep's yogurt!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by girlhk View Post
                          What is the difference between pasture-raised full-fat plain and Greek?
                          Greek yogurt is strained; it alters the ratio between the proteins somehow... removes the whey, leaves more casein, I think. (Human milk is 60:40 whey to casein, cow's milk is 20:80, so if I'm right that Greek stuff has less whey, it's even more foreign to our bodies than unaltered cow's milk). You'd have to Google it for more details.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by 2ndChance View Post
                            I wouldn't add dairy to your diet if you aren't eating it already. If you must eat yogurt, get pasture-raised full-fat plain (not Greek); it's the closest to nature.
                            Although this statement might have been valid several hundred years ago today I find (possibly) two issues with it:
                            1. The only difference between old-fashioned Greek-style yogurt and plain yogurt is the fact that Greek-style has its water (whey) drained and thus has been thickened - at least that should be it if it's made at home they way old people from that part of the world make it. I don't see how this makes Greek-style yogurt more "processed" and less healthy than plain (if that's what you mean by "not close to nature"). I grew up in Bulgaria which is the Northern neighbor of Greece and Turkey and that's how my grandmother made Greek yogurt - by dumping the plain yogurt in cloth and letting it drain overnight. So, that's with the "closest to nature" statement.
                            2. In old times (before the western world became heavily industrialized) the pasture-derived dairy was certainly the best that you could have (and it was the only one that you could have). The problem with pasture dairy today is that if the pastures were in closer proximity to manufacturing plants - especially plastics and all types of waste and medical waste incinerators - the pastures are contaminated with dioxins.

                              Dioxins are chlorine-based "man-made" environmental pollutants that have carcinogenic properties (for all we know). They accumulate in animal fat (in the milk fat as well) and from their in human fat. They take up to 13 years to metabolize by the body. Here is a USDA report on dioxins if you want to read more. I was interested in the difference between grass-fed and purely organic dairy (not grass-fed) and that is one of the big differences I discovered - dioxins and other environmental toxins in grass-fed dairy (I wrote an article about that on my website).

                              Of course, not all dairy from pastured cows is contaminated with dangerous doses of dioxins and other environmental pollutants. The problems that as far as I know there isn't a reliable way to check and see where the grass-fed dairy is coming from and whether the lands there are contaminated. The problem becomes even bigger from the fact that large organic dairy plants buy grass-fed milk from multiple smaller farms and all that milk is mixed into one making potentially non-contaminated with environmental toxins grass-fed milk possibly become contaminated.


                            Sorry. This was kinda lengthy but I felt like adding the details for clarity.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by 2ndChance View Post
                              Greek yogurt is strained; it alters the ratio between the proteins somehow... removes the whey, leaves more casein, I think. (Human milk is 60:40 whey to casein, cow's milk is 20:80, so if I'm right that Greek stuff has less whey, it's even more foreign to our bodies than unaltered cow's milk). You'd have to Google it for more details.
                              I posted before I saw your second post, explaining why you find Greek yogurt foreign..

                              To comment on this post: I think you are correct about the altered whey:casein ratios in strained yogurt vs plain, but I don't think this is unnatural in any way. If we say it's unnatural then all cheeses (that have been around for thousands of years) are unnatural too since they are almost entirely missing the whey fraction (apart from ricotta-style cheeses).

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                              • #30
                                And to be honest, it is mostly the whey that promotes growth while casein is much more slowly digested (otherwise, the poor cow would have some issues feeding its calves ...). So while the ratios aren't "natural", the natural protein ratios in milk are "meant" for the specific goal to have the calves grow! I am no calf so Greek yogurt is OK with me

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