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Can gluten trigger mood swings and anxiety?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Zach View Post
    Seriously, again with the addiction? You have a very warped and unhealthy view on food.
    You're a laugh riot, after admitting you eat it because it gives you a major rush.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
      You're a laugh riot, after admitting you eat it because it gives you a major rush.
      I said i didnt eat wheat for a month and a half, ate a bunch and felt great. How do you get from that that i am addicted to wheat?

      So according to you,
      Wheat = heroin
      Sugar = cocaine

      Man i better get to NA.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Derpamix View Post
        Tryptophan excess in tissues is indicative of aging(white hair is rich in tryptophan), it's the precursor to stress hormones melatonin and serotonin. It can be converted to either vitamin b3 or serotonin, during stressful times, aging, and malnutrition it's most likely to be converted to serotonin. Serotonin is inflammatory and causes stress in all organs.

        What they tell you about serotonin is criminally wrong.
        Not saying you are wrong, but how do you know the tryptophan in the white hair is an "excess level" in the tissues?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by StephenHLi View Post
          Not saying you are wrong, but how do you know the tryptophan in the white hair is an "excess level" in the tissues?
          It is a theory in that tryptophan is needed in rapid growth, but with adult tissues it's associated with the process of decline.
          Make America Great Again

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          • #20
            Personally (I'm Celiac), Gluten has a MUCH larger affect on me neurologically than physically. Don't get wrong. If I went and ate Papa Johns tonight I'd be glued to the toilet 15-20 times a day for the next two weeks or so, but the neurological effects are much worse for me personally.

            From Dr. Allesio Fasano, director of the Center for Celiac Research: (Simplified)
            Intestinal permeability is part of the reaction that takes place when someone with celiac disease eats gluten. To put it simply, molecules that should be kept within the intestines are able to “leak” out into the bloodstream. Gluten is one of those molecules. When gluten is carried by the blood to the brain, it causes problems. The gluten molecule is similar to endorphins which, along with other things, give us a sense of well-being. The gluten molecules will dock where endorphins are supposed to dock. In effect, gluten blocks endorphins and the positive feelings they can give us.

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            • #21
              It can definately have the feel good effect and create addiction in some individuals depending on how it binds to the endorphin receptors in the brain, beta caesin peptides are also believed to have similar properties.

              Just because you get a feel good effect does not mean it is not doing any damage elswhere, I think of it like anesthetising you so you don't feel the pain as it tears up your insides, biological warfare.

              Anyone for Milk & Cookies before bed?
              "There are no short cuts to enlightenment, the journey is the destination, you have to walk this path alone"

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Damiana View Post
                Are you sure it's the gluten and not the sodium/MSG making you feel like a brick and affecting your mood?
                Good point - MSG packs a serious punch for many people. That stuff is awful. For me, grains/gluten AND MSG is a recipe for disaster - I go from mentally energized, a little shaky and bouncing off the walls to a bitchy, puffy, wheezy, foggy-brained little ray of sunshine.

                For me, Chinese food is the devil.
                Life is not a matter of having good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.

                - Robert Louis Stevenson

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Omni View Post
                  It can definately have the feel good effect and create addiction in some individuals depending on how it binds to the endorphin receptors in the brain, beta caesin peptides are also believed to have similar properties.

                  Just because you get a feel good effect does not mean it is not doing any damage elswhere, I think of it like anesthetising you so you don't feel the pain as it tears up your insides, biological warfare.

                  Anyone for Milk & Cookies before bed?
                  Couldn't agree more! Great post.
                  Life is not a matter of having good cards, but of playing a poor hand well.

                  - Robert Louis Stevenson

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