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Bacon will kill you!!!

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  • #31
    From here: Roasted Pig Snout - Houston - Restaurants and Dining - Eating Our Words

    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
      Interesting photo's there choco. Actually I'd like to see how they look from consuming a 6hr slow smoked rack of ribs.
      Please provide a link where I can volunteer for that study. In the meantime, I'd be happy to meet bacon in the thunderdome and see who is the one to leave.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by richnash33 View Post
        Some money quotes:

        "It showed people who ate a lot of processed meat were also more likely to smoke,
        be obese and have other behaviours known to damage health."
        --Yep which also played a part in death.."
        This is just a general comment, as if you look to the next part...

        "But after adjusting for smoking, obesity and other confounders
        we THINK there is a risk of eating processed meat."--they THINK oh well that settles it..real scientific"
        They confirm that they adjusted for confounding variables. As for "think", learn a little about science please. You can almost never claim 100% proof.

        "But wait there's more....

        Tracy Parker, a heart health dietitian with the British Heart Foundation, said the research suggested processed meat MIGHT be linked to an increased risk of early death, but those who ate more of it in the study also made "other unhealthy lifestyle choices".

        "They were found to eat less fruit and vegetables and were more likely to smoke, which may have had an impact on results.

        ---Gee you think ?!? Seriously so this what constitutes a scientific study these days

        Of course the media will take the big scary headline and run with it"

        More or less what I said before. "Might" is how science works, unless a hell of a lot of research is done. Gravity is still a theory. And they have adjusted for confounding variables, which means that they did find a link between processed food consumption and death.
        http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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        • #34
          Is the debate about a study that claims processed food is problematic?

          Isn't Primal all about getting away from processed food because it's problematic?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by vtphoenix View Post
            Is the debate about a study that claims processed food is problematic?

            Isn't Primal all about getting away from processed food because it's problematic?
            Do you consider bacon, sausage and ham to be processed food?

            "Processed" casts a wide net. Cheerios, Hot Pockets and Doritos are processed foods. So is coconut oil, butter, bacon and cheese. Where do you draw the line? If you eat no processed food, you can't even buy steaks at the store. After all, it's processed by a butcher. Unless you're picking your own fruits and vegetables and slaughtering your own cow, you're eating some degree of processed food.
            Last edited by ChocoTaco369; 03-08-2013, 07:33 AM.
            Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by vtphoenix View Post
              Is the debate about a study that claims processed food is problematic?

              Isn't Primal all about getting away from processed food because it's problematic?
              Mark doesn't seem to have a problem with bacon.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by ChocoTaco369 View Post
                Do you consider bacon, sausage and ham to be processed food?

                "Processed" casts a wide net. Cheerios, Hot Pockets and Doritos are processed foods. So is coconut oil, butter, bacon and cheese. Where do you draw the line? If you eat no processed food, you can't even buy steaks at the store. After all, it's processed by a butcher. Unless you're picking your own fruits and vegetables and slaughtering your own cow, you're eating some degree of processed food.
                I think we have to consider degrees and quality of processing. Could I make bacon from a few simple ingredients? Yes. Could I control for ingredients of lesser quality (e.g., sugar)? Yes. But could I make Cheerios, Hot Pockets, or Doritos? No. I could make knock-offs, but looking at the ingredient lists of those products, it's obvious that they've crossed the line of acceptability WRT processing. I could make olive oil - build a press, extract the oil. I could extract coconut oil. These are processed foods that are not made of mysterious ingredients, and we can make choices as to the quality of how they are processed (cold-pressed EVOO, virgin coconut oil).

                When I cook a meal, I am in a sense "processing" it, but not in the way that we consider processed foods unhealthful. There is a difference between the hamburger I grill and the one prepared by McDonald's with its flavor enhancers.

                So much like other things in Primal, the notion of processing must be considered a spectrum, where the center of the supermarket is generally composed of processed food that are not acceptable, with a few exceptions (coffee, spices, etc.). The notion of processing foods by cooking from ingredients like meat, fish, vegetables, and spices is at the opposite end of the spectrum from Doritos, and there are definite separations not only of degrees but of order. Most of this becomes intuitive when eating Primally, but the question of processing boils down to: Could I make that exactly? Or would I need to alter it to prepare it myself? And of course quality of ingredients is always a factor. Yes, I could make a doughnut, but should I do so? No.

                This is all rather timely as I would like to try making my own sausage and charcuterie this year.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
                  I think we have to consider degrees and quality of processing. Could I make bacon from a few simple ingredients? Yes. Could I control for ingredients of lesser quality (e.g., sugar)? Yes. But could I make Cheerios, Hot Pockets, or Doritos? No. I could make knock-offs, but looking at the ingredient lists of those products, it's obvious that they've crossed the line of acceptability WRT processing. I could make olive oil - build a press, extract the oil. I could extract coconut oil. These are processed foods that are not made of mysterious ingredients, and we can make choices as to the quality of how they are processed (cold-pressed EVOO, virgin coconut oil).
                  I agree with you. Some people call this the "fail-eo" movement. I disagree. A good example are "paleo pancakes." Some people sneer at them simply because they're in the shape of a pancake and therefore evil. I look at them as...a banana, an egg and a teaspoon of tapioca starch or coconut flour fried in a drop of Kerrygold. Seems pretty good to me. Some processed foods can be healthier than unprocessed foods - I'll take my paleo pancake above over a skinless chicken breast and raw kale even though the latter is less processed. And those raw diets...they're often as unprocessed as they come, but cooking fibrous vegetables and denaturing animal protein with heat actually makes it more available to the body! Context is important.

                  Originally posted by Finnegans Wake View Post
                  When I cook a meal, I am in a sense "processing" it, but not in the way that we consider processed foods unhealthful. There is a difference between the hamburger I grill and the one prepared by McDonald's with its flavor enhancers.
                  Yep. If McDonald's french fries were simply white potatoes fried in beef tallow with salt and pepper, I'd say that would be a pretty guiltless occasional treat. But times have changed.

                  FYI - making your own sausage is super easy. This is all you need:

                  Amazon.com: Deni 3500 800-Watt Professional Grade Meat Grinder: Kitchen & Dining

                  Amazon.com: Eastman Outdoors 38672 Natural Hog Casings, for 25-Pounds of Sausage: Patio, Lawn & Garden

                  I have both and it works pretty well.
                  Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                  • #39
                    Just got a manual grinder for Christmas and a local supermarket (Wegmans) actually sells casings. Also going to try grinding my own burger meat out of chuck and short rib.

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                    • #40
                      Try tossing in a small calf liver. It's a good way to get liver into your diet without knowing you're eating liver. I still can't stand it.
                      Don't put your trust in anyone on this forum, including me. You are the key to your own success.

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                      • #41
                        I think I am going to try and make my own bacon. Looks easy, but not sure where to get the pork belly.
                        An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
                        -Somebody funny

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