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  • Osteroporosis

    Has anyone successfully cured Osteroporosis? If so, how did you do it? Please include your test numbers and length of time involved.
    Mine is so bad, 2.5 standard deviations, that I'm was walking hip fracture waiting to happen. In fact, being in the lowest 2% of the population, it's something of a miracle it hasn't happened yet. Yes, I'm being very very careful. I take Boneva and a boat-load of calcuim which the doctors told me would cure it, but after 6 years the best reading is that it hasn't gotten worse.
    Today the FDA told us to stop taking Calcium and Vit. D because it does no good. I expect that we didn't take enough Vit. D along with Mg, Vit.s A, D, E, and K2, all of which are necessary to absorb calcium and direct it to the bones. I'm now taking all these, but I'd really like to hear about some success.
    Last edited by Cryptocode; 02-26-2013, 10:06 AM.
    "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

  • #2
    I see an anti-aging physician who warned me years ago to refuse medications (like Boniva) because studies have shown that while it prevents breakdown of bone to some degree, its secondary result is the prevention of bone building. He underlined that the break-down/buildup process is quite a natural process that your body has been doing from the get-go. When the meds interfere with this process, one is left with old, increasingly porous bone which is more likely to break. Sorry for that bad news, but I would think that under the circumstances, you have done well to maintain. My internist, of course, was pushing the meds and the calcium tabs b/c he said I had osteopenia -- however, eating as I do now and w/o their meds, I was told on the last scan (over a year ago) that the osteopenia was gone. I'll have a follow-up this summer and will see how that looks. Wish I had #s to give you, but will ask on the repeat test.
    Starting Weight: 197.5
    Current Weight: 123
    Far healthier!

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    • #3
      I had osteopenia as a side effect of chemo. I cant give you numbers but I know that I have completely reversed it and I am back to normal (confirmed by a bone density scan). Lots of meat, dairy, bone broth, bone marrow, and offal in my diet.

      I agree with Janie about the meds. I also don't take any supplements but I do get a lot of SoCal sunshine.

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      • #4
        Hmmmm. Very Interesting. So you're both sort of recommending that I stop the Boniva and take bone broth. If so I'll proabaly supplement with Ca and it's needed environment.
        Immediately I think - Is it really safe to stop Boniva. I have a mouth full of implants. What if they fall out? I'd rather thought that only the Boniva was holding then in. (I'm a little worried here.)
        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cryptocode View Post
          I take Boneva and a boat-load of calcuim which the doctors told me would cure it, but after 6 years the best reading is that it hasn't gotten worse.
          Hey, Cryptocode. What's the definition of insanity again?

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          • #6
            I had osteopenia. I reversed it by first getting my hormones optimized-- thyroid, estradiol (I'm female and had undetectable levels). I was also very Vitamin D deficient, even while getting plenty of sun in San Diego.

            There is a blood(or urine) test to used to measure the rate of bone turnover. That test is called N-telopeptide. This test let me know I was building more bone than I was breaking down.

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            • #7
              I have mild osteopenia, and I've heard that calcium supplements do no good, so I only take what's in my multi-vit. (500 mg). I can't take more because calcium has to be 4 hours away from my thyroid hormones, and my T3 is split throughout the day.

              However, I've just started adding Strontium, which I've heard good things about. Several women I know have stopped the advance of osteopenia with Strontium.

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              • #8
                I have osteoporosis - I refused all the heavy duty chemicals (I'm only 30) because the side effects and risks (dental wise etc) were horrific. I'm now getting vitamin d injections and taking cholecalciferol - as an experiment. I'm usually on calcichew d3 forte. I'm told it won't be cured but hopefully won't get worse and may improve alittle.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paleobird View Post
                  Hey, Cryptocode. What's the definition of insanity again?
                  LOL, Yeah! Yeah! Fear is a great defense.

                  Does anyone have any references to medications (like Boniva) studies have shown that while it prevents breakdown of bone to some degree, its secondary result is the prevention of bone building?
                  "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                  • #10
                    I had copies of papers from medical journals given me by the doc but I no longer have them. I remember one discussed the higher incidents of fractures of the arm in elderly women who had been on medication. I'm assuming such info can be found on PubMed or by Googling. I do believe there has been a good bit written about this. Sorry I can't be more helpful.
                    Starting Weight: 197.5
                    Current Weight: 123
                    Far healthier!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by janie View Post
                      I had copies of papers from medical journals given me by the doc but I no longer have them. I remember one discussed the higher incidents of fractures of the arm in elderly women who had been on medication. I'm assuming such info can be found on PubMed or by Googling. I do believe there has been a good bit written about this. Sorry I can't be more helpful.
                      My research yields:
                      A drop in estrogen in women at the time of menopause and a drop in testosterone in men is a leading cause of bone loss. Other causes of bone loss include:
                      Being confined to a bed
                      Certain medical conditions
                      Taking certain medications

                      Other risk factors include:
                      Absence of menstrual periods (amenorrhea) for long periods of time
                      A family history of osteoporosis
                      Drinking a large amount of alcohol
                      Low body weight
                      Smoking

                      and as treatment, in addition to the Bisphosphonates, which Boniva is, there are other treatments:

                      1. Estrogen is approved for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and osteoporosis in women after menopause. Because of recent evidence that breast cancer, strokes, blood clots, and heart attacks may be increased in some women who take estrogen, the Food and Drug Administration recommends that women take the lowest effective dose for the shortest period possible. Estrogen should only be considered for women at significant risk for osteoporosis, and nonestrogen medications should be carefully considered first.
                      2. Raloxifene, available as a daily pill, is approved for use in postmenopausal women. From a class of drugs called estrogen agonists/antagonists, also referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), raloxifene is a nonhormonal drug that has estrogen-like effects on the skeleton, but blocks estrogen effects in the breast and uterus. Raloxifene slows bone loss and reduces the risk of fractures in the spine, but no effect on hip fracture has been seen. Side effects may include hot flashes and an increased risk of blood clots in some women.
                      3. Calcitonin, available as a daily nasal spray or injection, is approved for the treatment of osteoporosis in women who are at least 5 years past menopause. It is a hormone produced by the thyroid gland that slows bone loss and reduces the risk of spine fractures. It has no serious side effects.
                      4. Teriparatide, a form of human parathyroid hormone, stimulates new bone formation. Given as a daily injection for up to 24 months, it increases bone tissue and bone strength, and has been shown to reduce the risk of spine and other fractures.Teriparatide is approved for use in postmenopausal women and men who are at high risk of fracture. Some patients experience leg cramps and dizziness from teriparatide.
                      5. Denosumab, a rank ligand (RANKL) inhibitor, is available as an injection every six months for postmenopausal women.

                      It is clear that lack of the hormones estrogen and progestrone are as important as the lack of sufficient calcium and Vit.D., and that there is a signigicant difference between pre-menapausal and post-menapausal bone loss.
                      "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                      • #12
                        Do you have a link for the "no more calcium or vitamin d"? I haven't seen that, yet.

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                        • #13
                          Would doing some light weight lifting be beneficial ???? and perhaps increase the weights as your bones strengthen? or am I way off track ?????
                          "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                          ...small steps....

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                          • #14
                            Are you all on estrogen therapy?
                            "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                            • #15
                              In osteoporosis, FOSAMAX and BONIVA works by slowing down the process of old bone being removed, which allows the bone-forming cells time to rebuild normal bone. FOSAMAX not only helps prevent the loss of bone but actually helps to rebuild bone and makes bone less likely to fracture. Thus, FOSAMAX prevents or reverses the progression of osteoporosis. FOSAMAX starts working on the bone cells immediately, but measurable effects on bone mass may not be seen for several months or more.

                              In Paget's disease, FOSAMAX slows down bone resorption, which allows the bone-forming cells time to rebuild normal bone.

                              FOSAMAX belongs to a group of non-hormonal medicines called bisphosphonates.

                              The above is from the company that produces FOSAMAX.
                              Last edited by Cryptocode; 02-26-2013, 09:15 PM.
                              "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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