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100% Cacao -- quality fat?

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  • 100% Cacao -- quality fat?

    I'm eating one big meal per day which is packed with quality meat and veggies, so nutrition is not an issue. That big meal comes around 6:00pm. During the rest of the day, I've just been nibbling on a 100% cacao bar (Ghiradelli, no sugar... the entire bar is 4oz) and I find it keeps me really satiated.

    Although I rarely get through all 4oz, is there any problem with doing this? On average I'm doing 3/4ths of a bar, which comes to 412 calories, 43g fat, 26g carbs (half of which is fiber, so only 13g net), and 9.5g protein (although obviously I don't count this towards my daily protein total). It wards off any temptation for the bread and sugar which is around me all day, so I can get home safely to my primal dinner

  • #2
    (I should note, I'm doing no dairy, no fruit, no nuts... just the cacao, meat, greens, and an avocado here and there)

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    • #3
      by itself it's not a bad food, but it's basically just squares of non-nutrition. if you feel compelled to nibble and snack, you either need a bigger meal, or another smallish one during the day. bring some hard-boiled eggs or something.
      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

      – Ernest Hemingway

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      • #4
        Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
        by itself it's not a bad food, but it's basically just squares of non-nutrition. if you feel compelled to nibble and snack, you either need a bigger meal, or another smallish one during the day. bring some hard-boiled eggs or something.
        chocolate has a very sizable amount of minerals and has bounds of health benefits. The only problem is the high phosphorus content.
        Make America Great Again

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        • #5
          many of which are destroyed by roasting which is needed to turn them into bars. the same cannot be said for eggs, oysters or liver.
          As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

          – Ernest Hemingway

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
            by itself it's not a bad food, but it's basically just squares of non-nutrition. if you feel compelled to nibble and snack, you either need a bigger meal, or another smallish one during the day. bring some hard-boiled eggs or something.
            I just think of it like my version of coconut oil (I know a lot of people take spoonfuls when they're feeling low-energy... I just hate coconut, haha)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
              many of which are destroyed by roasting which is needed to turn them into bars. the same cannot be said for eggs, oysters or liver.
              No, sorry... roasting does not destroy the minerals, though the process used can change the content some.
              For instance the iron in dutched cocoa is slightly more available than in regular, but regular favors magnesium.

              Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Cocoa, dry powder, unsweetened, processed with alkali [Dutch cocoa]
              Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Cocoa, dry powder, unsweetened

              My package of organic raw cacao powder at home says this:
              One ounce organic raw cacao powder contains:
              Calories: 120, Calories from Fat: 23
              Total Fat: 2.5g, 4% Recommended daily value
              Saturated Fat: 1.5g, 7%
              Sodium: 20mg, 1%
              Total Carbohydrates: 19.0g, 6%
              Dietary Fiber: 7.0g, 28%
              Protein: 5.0g
              Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 0%, Calcium 4%, Iron 16%

              So processing actually increased the iron content per the weight of the product.
              Since my home bag doesn't have an extensive mineral list like Nutritiondata I can't make a full comparison to how it affected the other minerals.
              “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
              ~Friedrich Nietzsche
              And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
                No, sorry... roasting does not destroy the minerals, though the process used can change the content some.
                For instance the iron in dutched cocoa is slightly more available than in regular, but regular favors magnesium.

                Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Cocoa, dry powder, unsweetened, processed with alkali [Dutch cocoa]
                Nutrition Facts and Analysis for Cocoa, dry powder, unsweetened

                My package of organic raw cacao powder at home says this:
                One ounce organic raw cacao powder contains:
                Calories: 120, Calories from Fat: 23
                Total Fat: 2.5g, 4% Recommended daily value
                Saturated Fat: 1.5g, 7%
                Sodium: 20mg, 1%
                Total Carbohydrates: 19.0g, 6%
                Dietary Fiber: 7.0g, 28%
                Protein: 5.0g
                Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 0%, Calcium 4%, Iron 16%

                So processing actually increased the iron content per the weight of the product.
                Since my home bag doesn't have an extensive mineral list like Nutritiondata I can't make a full comparison to how it affected the other minerals.
                Thanks for your input! saved me having to do that extra research

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                • #9
                  isn't there a difference between a bar and powder? the latter of which is simply pulverized bits?

                  am not trying to be cantankerous.
                  As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                  – Ernest Hemingway

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
                    So processing actually increased the iron content per the weight of the product.
                    The extra iron is coming off of the machines doing the processing ("Dutch" cocoa is very highly processed at not "natural" or paleo in any meaningful sense of the word). That's not a joke - companies have been working on "iron-free" processing equipment to reduce this effect - it comes from tiny filings off of the equipment.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DeeDub View Post
                      The extra iron is coming off of the machines doing the processing ("Dutch" cocoa is very highly processed at not "natural" or paleo in any meaningful sense of the word). That's not a joke - companies have been working on "iron-free" processing equipment to reduce this effect - it comes from tiny filings off of the equipment.
                      wow that's a bit frightening... I thought Dutch processing was only done to powder though, and not to bars? I could be wrong.

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                      • #12
                        Related: Take any breakfast cereal with "Reduced Iron" in the ingredients list into a glass bowl, soak in water and mash into a watery goo. Put a neodymium magnet at the bottom outside of the bowl and you can see the iron attract.

                        Might be able to do that with the Dutch process stuff...

                        M.

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                        • #13
                          Correct, minerals cannot be destroyed by cooking or processing, they are inorganic. Inorganic means they have no carbon-based structures that can be degraded by heat and pressure; minerals are found as themselves on the periodic table, although there are various ionization states that may affect bioavailablity. However, the organics that can be degraded or altered by cooking or processing include vitamins and flavanoids or any other phytochemicals.

                          on topic I think the cocoa fat is fine.
                          Natural products super cheap @ iherb: Use discount code SEN850 at http://www.iherb.com/?rcode=sen850 for $10 off first order; free shipping $20+ order in USA

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                          • #14
                            /head desk.

                            No.

                            This is not about iron from machinery.
                            It's about roasting.

                            It's like the fact that the way you cook liver can either raise or lower the iron content per weight of the food.
                            Mild gentle heat can = more available iron, while high intense heat like frying reduces it.
                            (At least that's how it reads on every Nutritiondata analysis chart I've look at, which is many.)

                            Cacao beans are gently slow roasted... it makes the iron slightly more available.
                            Dutched cacao has simply been slightly alkalized(this is not "evil", baking soda is alkaline you know), which just means the acidity has been reduced!
                            This can be very good for some people who are sensitive to other chocolates.


                            The difference in cacao powder and bars is fat content. Bars have more cacao butter (or other fats if they don't use all cacao butter) in it which glues it all together.

                            But it was still roasted as beans, and ground smooth just like the powder.
                            Last edited by cori93437; 02-18-2013, 02:52 PM.
                            “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                            ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                            And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                            Comment

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